Author Archives: Heidi Simon

Place-based CPTED for Safe Communities Part 2 (Skills-based CPTED Training)

This workshop will start with a classroom session of the history, background and core learning objectives of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is a proactive technique in which the design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear of and incidents of crime and asocial behavior. This will build on the training held on the first day. On Day 2, participants will break into small groups and travel to a local site to test their knowledge by completing a CPTED assessment in the field. Groups will return to the classroom before the end of the session to give presentations on their findings and have a discussion as a group. Workbook will be provided.

About the Facilitators

  • Faith Kistler is a Police Analyst with the St. Louis County Police Department. As a Police Analyst she identifies and maps crime data, while looking for patterns and trends. She performs analyses, data munging, and data visualization on all forms of police related data. Faith has the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Professional Designation. With this certification Faith has performed several assessments in the St. Louis County region.
  • Brittain (Britt) Storck has established her landscape architectural career around greenway and trail placemaking, natural resource-based recreation projects, and active community design and planning for 15 years. She co-chairs Alta’s National Trail Service Area, leads the firm’s east coast Landscape Architecture practice, and is a national expert on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Britt has worked collaboratively with engineers and planners, urban designers and in a volunteer capacity across the country to develop projects that activate communities and improve the quality of life. She has the CPTED Professional Designation (CPD) credentials obtained through the National Institute of Crime Prevention (NICP) training program. Individuals with this designation are qualified to identify strategies and concepts for projects that effect human behavior and influence a project’s real and perceived safety. CPTED experts perform field assessments and site plan reviews, write CPTED ordinances, author design guidelines, and provide overlay districts for planning and zoning.

 

Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Workshop – Field Visit

This group field visit is a continuation of the Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) workshop from earlier in the morning.  Participants will evaluate a nearby corridor for pedestrian safety and make recommendations for improvement, if needed, based on the knowledge and skilled obtained during the morning session of the workshop.  This workshop will provide an overview of pedestrian crossing safety issues and provide resources for addressing these issues.   Pedestrian treatments that will be discussed include: Rectangular rapid flashing beacons (RRFBs), Leading pedestrian intervals (LPIs), Crosswalk visibility enhancements, Raised crosswalks, Pedestrian crossing/refuge islands, Pedestrian hybrid beacons (PHBs), and Road Diets.

Attendance at the Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) workshop morning session is a pre-requisite for attending this field visit.

Summit attendees interested in also attending the STEP Workshop will need to register for the workshop separately using MoDOT’s Learning Management System, MoDOTU.  Click Here to create a Guest User Account.  If you have already signed up for a MoDOTU account, Click Here to sign in with your username and password.  To find the class in MoDOTU search for “STEP Workshop”.

Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Workshop (8am-12pm)

This Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) workshop is being provided in tandem with the National Walking Summit. This workshop will provide an overview of pedestrian crossing safety issues and provide resources for addressing these issues.   Pedestrian treatments that will be discussed include: Rectangular rapid flashing beacons (RRFBs), Leading pedestrian intervals (LPIs), Crosswalk visibility enhancements, Raised crosswalks, Pedestrian crossing/refuge islands, Pedestrian hybrid beacons (PHBs), and Road Diets.  The workshop includes a group field visit that will take place during the Learning-from-Place Workshops (2:15pm-3:35pm) where participants will evaluate a nearby corridor for pedestrian safety and make recommendations for improvement if needed.

Summit attendees interested in also attending the STEP Workshop will need to register for the workshop separately using MoDOT’s Learning Management System, MoDOTU.  Click Here to create a Guest User Account.  If you have already signed up for a MoDOTU account, Click Here to sign in with your username and password.  To find the class in MoDOTU search for “STEP Workshop”.

Evening Reception “A Taste of St. Louis” (5p-7p)

Join America Walks and local partners for an evening reception welcoming attendees to St. Louis with small bites and tastes from some local eateries.

Featured Guests

In April 2017, Lyda Krewson won a historic election to become the first woman to serve as mayor of St. Louis. Prior to the election, Krewson served as 28th Ward Alderwoman. She is also a CPA and served as the CFO for an international design firm until her election as Mayor in 2017.

As Mayor, Krewson has focused intently on public safety, naming Judge Jimmie Edwards as Director of Public Safety and John Hayden as Chief of Police. She also led the effort to pass Proposition P, a half cent sales tax to provide salary and benefit increases for police and firefighters, and a million each for summer jobs, recreation for kids, mental health, and demolition. Krewson is also focused on reducing vacant buildings, cleaning up St. Louis, increasing economic and workforce development, and providing good service to all St. Louis residents, businesses and visitors.

Krewson is known for her civility, determination and fairness in addressing issues.

During her tenure as 28th Ward Alderwoman, Krewson unapologetically took on tough and controversial issues including passing the comprehensive smoking ban, fighting for common sense gun regulation, leading the effort to reduce the Board of Aldermen from 28 to 14, and passing the city’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.  Krewson worked closely with Forest Park Forever to renovate Forest Park, and with developers to bring responsible development to the Central West End, Skinker DeBaliviere, and the Loop. She is also known for making neighborhoods more accessible for walkers and bike riders, planting over 1,500 trees, sponsoring the “doggie dining” bill, and spearheading the Sunflower + Program.

After graduating with an education degree from Truman State University, Krewson moved to St. Louis where she earned her accounting degree from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Later she worked for Deloitte for 7 years.

In 1995 Lyda’s husband, architect Jeff Krewson, was tragically murdered in an attempted carjacking in front of their home. With the support of family, friends, and many great neighbors, Krewson raised her two kids and continued to live in her home in the Central West End. In 1998, she married Mike Owens. Today, they enjoy neighborhood walks, gardening, and occasional hikes in the mountains.

 

Place-based CPTED for Safe Communities Part 1 (Skills-based CPTED Training)

This workshop will start with a classroom session of the history, background and core learning objectives of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is a proactive technique in which the design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear of and incidents of crime and asocial behavior. Day 1 will be a classroom session to introduce participants to CPTED principles, public education techniques, and programmatic and operational measures for improving public space. Participants will learn how to perform a CPTED assessment.

About the Facilitators

  • Faith Kistler is a Police Analyst with the St. Louis County Police Department. As a Police Analyst she identifies and maps crime data, while looking for patterns and trends. She performs analyses, data munging, and data visualization on all forms of police related data. Faith has the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Professional Designation. With this certification Faith has performed several assessments in the St. Louis County region.
  • Brittain (Britt) Storck has established her landscape architectural career around greenway and trail placemaking, natural resource-based recreation projects, and active community design and planning for 15 years. She co-chairs Alta’s National Trail Service Area, leads the firm’s east coast Landscape Architecture practice, and is a national expert on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Britt has worked collaboratively with engineers and planners, urban designers and in a volunteer capacity across the country to develop projects that activate communities and improve the quality of life. She has the CPTED Professional Designation (CPD) credentials obtained through the National Institute of Crime Prevention (NICP) training program. Individuals with this designation are qualified to identify strategies and concepts for projects that effect human behavior and influence a project’s real and perceived safety. CPTED experts perform field assessments and site plan reviews, write CPTED ordinances, author design guidelines, and provide overlay districts for planning and zoning.

 

ADA Transition Plans: Making Communities Accessible for All

An ADA Transition Plan is a legally-binding commitment by a local or state government entity to make specific accessibility improvements in the public space within a specific time frame. This panel discussion will start with the history of Missouri’s Statewide ADA Transition Plan, present up-to-date information on the implementation of that plan and others, and provide you with the knowledge to initiate or advance this effective legal strategy in your own community.

Learning Objectives:

After this panel discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Explain, in general terms, what is meant by an “ADA Transition Plan”
  • Describe typical processes through which ADA Transition Plans are developed and implemented by state and local government entities
  • Give specific examples of accessibility improvements that have been completed or are planned by MoDOT and the City of St. Louis as part of their ADA Transition Plans
  • Discuss ways for advocates to engage with state and local government entities to assist with the development or implementation of ADA Transition Plans

About the Panel

  • Kim Lackey (Paraquad): Kim Lackey is the Senior Director of Public Policy and Independent Living at Paraquad Inc., a Center for Independent Living in St. Louis. At Paraquad, Kim is part of the leadership team that helps drive Paraquad’s mission. She guides and directs a team of individuals working to influence public policy, empower individuals with disabilities to live independently, and create change that improves the lives of individuals with disabilities. She attended the University of Missouri-Columbia and received a B.S. in History and Political Science. Kim graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, School of Law in May 2006 with her J.D. She has worked on improving access to employment, health care, public transportation and affordable accessible housing for individuals with disabilities for more than 12 years.
  • Tom Evers, PE: St. Louis Assistant District Engineer, Missouri Department of Transportation: Tom Evers is a graduate of the University of Missouri – Rolla, with a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering in December 1998. He became a Professional Engineer in the State of Missouri in 2007. In his 21 years with the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT), he’s held positions in Construction in North St. Louis County, and was a Transportation Project Manager in the St. Louis Area, overseeing the WB Blanchette Bridge rehabilitation project.
    In 2011 he became Area Engineer for MoDOT in St. Charles County. Currently, Tom is the St. Louis Assistant District Engineer, managing an internal program delivery staff of 200 employees and delivering nearly $300 million worth of projects. He lives in Maryland Heights with his wife and four children.
  • Julie Stotlemeyer (MoDOT, Central Office):Julie Stotlemeyer, Missouri Department of Transportation, Assistant State Design Engineer Julie oversees several areas within the Design Division at MoDOT, one of which is the Americans with Disabilities Act as it relates to design policy and projects. Part of those duties are oversight of the department’s ADA transition plan and implementation. She has 27 years of experience with developing highway projects and operating the highway system. Julie is a graduate of the University of Missouri at Rolla with a BS in Civil Engineering and a licensed professional engineer in the state of Missouri.
  • David Newburger (City of St. Louis): David Newburger is Commissioner on the Disabled for the City of St. Louis and is a co-Founder of the Starkloff Disability Institute. He works toward the fundamental goal of making it possible for individuals with disabilities to be full and active participants in the community. As Commissioner, he is Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator for the City, helping the City comply with disabilities rights laws.He has also played a leading role in helping design major civic venues, such as, the Gateway Arch National Park, the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum in St. Louis, and the St. Louis Cardinals baseball stadium, to seamlessly welcome individuals with the wide variety of disabilities.Mr. Newburger has been an advocate for including people with disabilities in many capacities and over many years. He has an A.B from Oberlin College and J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. He has taught law both at the Washington University School of Law and the Saint Louis University School of Law.
    Mr. Newburger is widowed with one married daughter and two grandchildren. He had polio as an infant and has mobility and related disabilities.

The Ten Toe Express Explores Wash U’s Connection to Transit

The Ten Toe Express is a program created by Citizens for Modern Transit in partnership with AARP St. Louis, designed to teach active older adults how to navigate the transit system while incorporating healthy habits like walking, healthy eating, and social interaction.  This Learning from Place workshop will provide an overview of the Ten Toe Express program and a special guided tour of Washington University and its connections to transit.

Walkers will first explore the Active Commuter Hub with special guest walk leader Clara Steyer, then participants will hop on the East bound Blue line to explore the Central West End MetroLink Station.  This station is the busiest station on the MetroLink alignment and is currently undergoing construction and will serve as  future model for other stations regarding safety, security, and access control.  The final stop will be the Cortex MetroLink station.  Walkers will learn about Washington University’s connection to this station, along with CMT’s role in bringing the station to fruition.  Afterwards, participants will ride back to the Skinker MetroLink station to resume summit activities.

Advanced Campaign Planning and Implementation (Skills-based Advocacy Training – Part 2)

Take your advocacy to the next level with this workshop. Topics covered will include issue research, coalition development, messaging for the public and elected officials, and using data to support your policy goals – all in the context of actual ongoing campaigns in the St. Louis area and statewide.

After the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain, in general terms, how advocates can impact public policy
  • Describe and discuss actual ongoing advocacy campaigns in the St. Louis area and statewide
  • Conduct advocacy campaign tasks, such as
    • Research an issue
    • Identify specific policy goals
    • Assemble a community coalition
    • Design/disseminate a messaging campaign
    • Meet with elected officials
    • Analyze/utilize data
  • Pick up the phone and discuss strategy/challenges with other advocates

Facilitators:

  • Taylor March (Trailnet): directs Trailnet’s walking, biking, and transit advocacy campaigns, policy work, and educational campaigns. Taylor’s work centers on the framework that infrastructure solutions are the most effective way to eliminate traffic fatalities on our streets, and having a plan for where infrastructure changes are needed is essential for St. Louis. Taylor is a League-Certified Cycling Instructor, has worked with car-free commuting initiatives and education campaigns that target infrastructure planning and community outreach. His past work with Trailnet’s Safe Routes to School Program leveraged parental and community involvement to promote and support physical activity. Before joining Trailnet, Taylor worked as a photovoltaic solar designer and project manager, and his passion for engineering, infrastructure, and the environment inform his work on public policy at Trailnet. Taylor is a full time bicycling, bus transit, and walking commuter and a League-Certified Cycling Instructor. Taylor has years of previous experience as the service manager at bicycle shops, teaching weekly mechanics clinics, as well as well as holding certifications in bicycle frame building and design through the United Bicycle Institute in Ashland, Oregon.
  • Faye Paige Edwards (GirlTrek): Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification.
    She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.
  • Kim Cella (Citizens for Modern Transit)
  • Ian Thomas (America Walks): Ian Thomas is the State and Local Program Director with America Walks. In this role, he develops and delivers education programs for advocates, professionals, and elected officials, about the benefits of walkable communities and strategies to create them.
    From 2000 until 2013, Ian served as the founding Executive Director of the PedNet Coalition of Columbia, MO. During this time, he developed one of the largest Walking School Bus programs in the country, coordinated a campaign that led to Columbia adopting the first “complete streets’ policy in Missouri, and was instrumental in reducing neighborhood speed limits.
    In 2013 and again in 2016 and 2019, Ian won election to the Columbia City Council, where he continues to advance healthy and walkable community policies. He is a member of Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council.

Note: This is a stand-alone workshop for Summit participants who already understand advocacy basics and wish to engage more deeply in actual campaigns, going forward. It is also the second of a two-part series for those are new to advocacy – Part 1 is on Tues., 2:15 – 3:45 pm.

The Basics of Advocacy for Community Change (Skills-based Advocacy Training – Part 1)

Sign up for this training if you’re new to advocacy and you want to raise a community issue and provide input to decision-makers. Through presentations, small-group discussions, and role-play activities, you will learn how to cultivate a civic voice and impact public policy, regulations, and laws.

After this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain, in general terms, what is meant by “advocacy”
  • Describe how advocates can influence values/culture leading to community change
  • Discuss the range of activities involved in advocacy, from simply showing up at a rally to understanding the policy levers that trigger a change in the law
  • Summarize components of a public policy advocacy campaign such as research, goal-setting, coalition-building, messaging, meeting with decision-makers, and utilizing data
  • Prepare arguments and counter-arguments for and against particular public policy proposals
  • Give examples of advocacy in other settings such as organizations and social groups

Facilitators:

  • Aimee Wehmeier (Paraquad): Aimee Wehmeier grew up in St. Charles, MO with a belief she could change the world. While attending the University of Missouri, she found a shared sense of culture and empowerment and, for the for the first time, didn’t feel ashamed of her disability. After advocating at the state level about her personal experiences, she realized the power of her voice. Currently Aimee is the President of Paraquad, one of the first grass roots advocacy Centers for Independent Living in the United States. To this day, Aimee believes that by working together and standing up for what you believe in, we can create meaningful policy change and make the world a better place.
  • Jacque Knight and Joanne Martin (CBB Transportation Engineers + Planners):Joanne is dedicated to creating innovative, long-lasting solutions to challenges facing the community’s transportation system for all modes of transportation. She first started developing her passion for transportation as an undergraduate student at Saint Louis University. Through her employment with transportation agencies in both the public and private sector, she has been able to cultivate a deeper understanding of the transportation industry from varying perspectives. Joanne has contributed to projects focusing on a wide variety of transportation network. Some of the projects in her career include Tower Grove East Neighborhood Study focused on improving walkability, Zumbehl Corridor Study focused on maintaining vehicular and pedestrian safety as traffic volumes grow, and I-270 North Design-Build project focused on improving mobility and safety for vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders in St. Louis North County.
  • Ian Thomas (America Walks):Ian Thomas is a veteran of the walkable communities movement. He served on the America Walks Board of Directors for seven years, until his appointment as our State and Local Program Director in September, 2014.
    In 2000, he co-founded the PedNet Coalition of Columbia MO, and led the organization as its Executive Director for 13 years. Among several accomplishments, he coordinated the campaign to pass Columbia’s Complete Streets policy in 2004 – one of the earliest such policies in the U.S. In 2013, Ian was elected to the Columbia City Council, where he launched several new initiatives to expand healthy community policies, including an effort to expand the city’s bus system. He is a member of Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council.
    Ian and his wife, Ellen, a pediatrician, live in Columbia.

Note: This is a stand-alone workshop for Summit participants who are new to advocacy and who want to understand the basics. It is also the first of a two-part series for those who wish to engage more deeply in actual advocacy campaigns, going forward – Part 2 is on Weds., 10:45 am – 12:15 pm.

Closing Ceremony (12:30pm-1:00pm)

Featuring the Saint Louis Story Stitchers:

The Saint Louis Story Stitchers Artists Collective is a non-profit organization engaged in urban storytelling. The mission of Saint Louis Story Stitchers is to document St. Louis through art and word to promote understanding, civic pride, intergenerational relationships and literacy.

Collective artists work alongside twenty 16-24-year-old urban youth to collect stories, reframe and retell them using the arts to promote a better educated, more peaceful and caring society. Saint Louis Story Stitchers are a resident organization at Kranzberg Arts Foundation where members rehearse, present and perform in the Foundation’s first-class spaces. The Collective also maintains the Stitchers Storefront Studio in the historic Loop District for recording, editing and publishing. Current projects focus on public health issues including gun violence.

Morning Keynote (8am-9am): Writing the Next Chapter

After an afternoon of exploring the local area and hearing from inspiring panelists, this keynote session will challenge attendees to think about how their experience at the National Walking Summit-St. Louis can help make the St. Louis community (and all attendees’ communities) more walkable in the years to come. Attendees will hear from a panel of thought leaders on the opportunities they see to overcome barriers and build a future where every neighborhood can be navigated safely, comfortably and joyfully on foot, including an overview of inspiring pedestrian projects that are in process in St. Louis right now.

About the Moderator

Kea Wilson has more than ten years experience as a writer telling emotional, urgent and actionable stories that motivate average Americans to get involved in making their cities better places. She is also a novelist, cyclist, and affordable housing advocate. She lives in St. Louis, MO, and can be reached at kea@streetsblog.org.

 



About the Panel

Jacque Knight is a Transportation Planner with CBB. Jacque has a passion for promoting transportation systems that put people first and create walkable, vibrant and healthy communities. She works to support a better quality of life through projects that enhance active transportation and increase access to opportunity. She is a transportation planner at CBB Transportation. Recent and current projects include St. Louis County Action Plan for Walking and Biking, Bevo Great Streets, Collinsville Great Streets, and the Downtown St. Louis Multimodal Plan. Jacque serves as the chair for the Community Mobility Committee, an advisory committee for the City of St. Louis on items related to walking, biking, and micromobility issues. Jacque has a Master of Urban Planning, a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies, all from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS.

Grace Kyung works at Urban Strategies, Inc. as a catalyst in changing how to plan for communities by applying a health and racial equity lens to develop healthy communities. To do this in a just way, she works alongside community members to recognize historical circumstances and the current conditions necessary to achieve equity. Grace is developing the Downtown East St. Louis Transformation Plan that’ll focus on housing, neighborhood, and people strategies to ensure all families are stable and thriving. Grace has received recognition and awards from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Missouri State APA, Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, and the Transportation Research Board. She is also a core-organizer with the Untokening, which is comprised of advocates from diverse social and racial backgrounds who work in professional and personal capacities to advance equity in mobility and community development.

Scott Ogilvie works in the Planning and Urban Design Agency for the City of St. Louis. Prior to that he served on the St. Louis Board of Aldermen for eight years. While being a champion for active transportation, he passed a number of pieces of legislation to improve the city’s non-motorized transportation amenities and policy. He also helped guide a number complete streets, traffic calming, and trail projects to completion. Outside of the transportation realm, he passed legislation limiting campaign donations in local elections, and participated in reform to the City’s tax incentive process. One of his proudest achievements was shepherding through the funding to resurface the badly deteriorated Penrose Park Velodrome, which reopened in 2019.

Opening Ceremony and Welcome “Setting the Stage” (1pm-2pm)

The National Walking Summit- St. Louis will explore how walking and walkability connects communities to overcome barriers, bridge divides, and address inequities that exist because of the legacies of injustices. In order to do that, we need to set the stage for the conversations, workshops, and learning we hope to take place by taking a look back at some of the history of St. Louis and surrounding areas and how that informs who (and where) we are today.

About the Keynote Speakers

Michael R. Allen works as an academic researcher, historian, teacher, design critic, public artist, critical spatial tour guide, and heritage conservationist in private practice. He is Senior Lecturer in Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. Allen also directs the Preservation Research Office, a historic preservation and urban history consulting firm that he founded in 2009. In 2018, the National Trust for Historic Preservation named Allen as one of its “40 Under 40” preservation practitioners. Allen’s writing on urban design and history has appeared in CityLabNext CityDisegno and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.


Bob Hughes joined Missouri Foundation for Health as the president and chief executive officer in 2012, after working as a visiting research professor in the Center for State Health Policy at Rutgers University. Prior to his time at Rutgers, Bob served in various leadership positions at The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in New Jersey. Since joining MFH, he has enhanced the strategic direction of the organization and positioned it to be a catalyst for change throughout the region. Under his leadership MFH focuses on fostering a culture of learning, exploration, and collaboration that promotes improvements in the health for Missourians. A native of Illinois, Bob received his doctorate in behavioral sciences from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.

Bob is a member of the National Academy of Medicine Leadership Consortium for a Value and Science-Driven Health System, as well as the Rippel Foundation’s FORESIGHT initiative advisory committee. He is the president of Build Missouri Health, MFH’s 501(c)(3) organization; serves on the board of the St. Louis Regional Chamber of Commerce; and is the former board chair of Grantmakers In Health. Something many may not know about Bob is that he coached the Johns Hopkins University men’s tennis team for three years.


Vetta Sanders Thompson is the E. Desmond Lee Professor of Racial and Ethnic Studies at the Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis and currently serves as the School’s Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Dr. Sanders Thompson received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Social Relations from Harvard University in 1981. She received her master’s degree and doctorate in psychology from Duke University in 1984 and 1988, where she also completed the Clinical Training program. Dr. Sanders Thompson serves as co-director of the Center for Community Health Partnership and Research at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University, is an associate member of the Siteman Cancer Center, and a faculty affiliate of the Department of African and African-American Studies, as well as the Interdisciplinary Program in Urban Studies. Dr. Thompson is a licensed psychologist and health service provider in the state of Missouri.

Dr. Sanders Thompson’s research is focused on the health and well-being of ethnic and racial minority communities, particularly the African-American community. She is a noted researcher in the areas of racial identity, psychosocial implications of race and ethnicity in health behavior and socio-cultural determinants of health and mental health disparities. Her goal is to empower members of the community to improve their health and well-being. She teaches courses in human diversity, health disparities, and evidence based treatments in mental health. Dr. Thompson has a history of funded research addressing promotion of cancer screening among African Americans and community engagement, including her current PCORI funded project to develop a measure of the quality of community and patient engaged research.

A licensed clinical psychologist, Sanders Thompson is active in numerous professional associations including the American Psychological Association, having served as an associate editor for the journal PsycCritiques: Contemporary Psychology and is a member of the Missouri Psychological Association. Dr. Thompson is a past Chair of the State Committee of Psychologist and a past President of the Missouri Psychological Association. Over the years she has been honored by the St. Louis community, as well as her professional colleagues. Among others, Dr. Thompson has received the 2018 Terry Leet Researcher of the Year Award from Generate Health, the 2017 Missouri Psychological Association Dr. Richard R. Wilkerson Lifetime Achievement Award and Mental Health America of Eastern Region Missouri Silver Key Award.


Henry (Hank) Webber is Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Administrative Officer and a Professor of Practice at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work and the School of Architecture and Urban Design at Washington University in St. Louis.

Mr. Webber oversees a wide variety of administrative and external affairs functions including on and off campus University real estate and facilities, human resources, University operations, information technology and security, with combined operating and capital budgets of over $500M annually and over 1,600 University and contracted staff. He has joint responsibility with the Provost for information technology and the Chancellor for external affairs.  He also chairs the University’s administrative cabinet.

Since coming to Washington University in 2008, Mr. Webber has led the development of the University’s real estate and sustainability master plans, long-term housing strategy and leads, along with the Provost and Chief Financial Officer, the University budget process. He lead “Campus Next: Enhancing the East End of the Danforth Campus,” the largest capital project in the history of Washington University. He has played a key role in the development of CORTEX, a 200-acre urban biotech redevelopment effort with 6,000 jobs and over 425 companies.

Outside of his administrative functions at the University, he is Chair of the Board of Directors of Invest STL, the St. Louis region’s community development effort, the Washington University Medical Center Redevelopment Corporation and CORTEX and on the Boards of Directors of The Downtown Partnership, Provident, RISE, and the Jewish Federation of St. Louis.

Mr. Webber obtained has a Master’s degree in Public Policy from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

The Cortex District

The Cortex District is a rapidly growing mixed use office community and technology hub that grew from a former heavy industrial area in mid-town St. Louis. See how both new and repurposed buildings have been knit together under a comprehensive master planning process that includes a new light rail station and multi-use trail, and extensive new pedestrian infrastructure and active public space. While much has already been completed, ongoing planning will help connect the District to adjacent neighborhoods and bridge existing gaps in infrastructure. Cortex is a 10 minute light-rail trip from the front of Washington University.

About the Facilitator: Scott Ogilvie works in the Planning and Urban Design Agency for the City of St. Louis. Prior to that he served on the St. Louis Board of Aldermen for eight years. While being a champion for active transportation, he passed a number of pieces of legislation to improve the city’s non-motorized transportation amenities and policy. He also helped guide a number complete streets, traffic calming, and trail projects to completion. He partnered with Trailnet in stopping St. Louis County’s South County Connector Highway project. Outside of the transportation realm, he passed legislation limiting campaign donations in local elections, and participated in reform to the City’s tax incentive process. One of his proudest achievements was shepherding through the funding to resurface the badly deteriorated Penrose Park Velodrome, which reopened in 2019.

Great Rivers Greenway St. Vincent Greenway walking tour with Girl Trek: Washington University to St. Vincent Greenway

Join us for a 4 mile round trip tour (via both transit and walking) and learn about GirlTrek’s best practices for a fun, inclusive and safe walk. This tour starts and ends at the Brown School of Social Work. We will ride one stop on the Skinker metrolink to St Vincent Greenway, then walk approximately one mile before turning around. The terrain is flat.

About the Faclitators

  • Deidre Brown has a passion for helping people be their best both academically and  physically.  She is a 2016 American Walks Walking College Fellow, a Trailnet Walk/Bike Ambassador, and has been a GirlTrek organizer since 2012.  Deidre promotes living an active lifestyle and acts as an advocate for making communities more livable and accessible for all.
    Additionally she is a founding member and President of the Riverview Gardens School District’s Foundation. She is an alumna and founding member and Treasurer of the Riverview Gardens High School Alumni Association.  She holds several degrees – a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science, a Graduate Certificate and Master of Science in System Engineering and a Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity. Deidre has been employed with Boeing for 20 years.
  • Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification.
    She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country  — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.
  • Sheryll Williams is Outreach Coordinator at Great Rivers Greenway. Great Rivers Greenway is developing a dynamic network of greenways that connect us to our rivers, parks and communities, and strengthen the social, economic and environmental well-being of the St. Louis region. Sheryll empowers people to explore how they can incorporate the greenways to ‘live life outside’ and enjoy nature.
    She will lead the walk on St. Vincent Greenway from campus via Metrolink to a neighborhood that has been transformed by the greenway. Participants will observe how the greenway meets varied transportation needs and connects people to nature.

Great Rivers Greenway Centennial Greenway Walking Tour with Girl Trek: Washington University to Delmar and Ackert Walkway

Join us for a 2.32 mile round trip tour on the Centennial Greenway and learn about GirlTrek’s best practices for a fun, inclusive and safe walk. This tour starts and ends at the Brown School of Social Work on the Washington University campus. We’ll follow the greenway across the campus, through the historic, tree-lined Parkview neighborhood to Delmar Loop / Ackert Walkway. The terrain is flat.

About the Facilitators

  • Deidre Brown has a passion for helping people be their best both academically and  physically.  She is a 2016 American Walks Walking College Fellow, a Trailnet Walk/Bike Ambassador, and has been a GirlTrek organizer since 2012.  Deidre promotes living an active lifestyle and acts as an advocate for making communities more livable and accessible for all.
    Additionally she is a founding member and President of the Riverview Gardens School District’s Foundation. She is an alumna and founding member and Treasurer of the Riverview Gardens High School Alumni Association.  She holds several degrees – a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science, a Graduate Certificate and Master of Science in System Engineering and a Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity. Deidre has been employed with Boeing for 20 years.
  • Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification.
    She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country  — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.
  • Sheryll Williams is Outreach Coordinator at Great Rivers Greenway, the public agency that is building a network of greenways to connect the region. Sheryll is an avid walker, public transit user and bicycle & pedestrian advocate. She promotes the benefits and raises awareness of the greenways at businesses, health fairs, expos, schools and festivals.
    She will lead the walk on the Centennial Greenway through campus to a nearby retail and residential community. Participants will experience how the greenway connects the communities and neighborhoods, provides transportation choices, promotes good health and improves economic vitality.

Experience Forest Park Though Its Network of Recreational Trails

This tour will highlight historic and contemporary aspects of one of the countries great urban parks. This casual walk will explore about 2.5 miles through the Park and view regional cultural attractions, sports facilities, recreational destinations and structures originally created for the 1904 World’s Fair.

About the Facilitator

John O’Gorman leads the ambitious fundraising operations for Forest Park Forever. Since joining Forest Park Forever in January 2012, O’Gorman has overseen the growth of the conservancy’s annual fundraising from $2.2 million to more than $3.2 million, as well as the successful completion of a $130 million capital and endowment campaign, the most ambitious in Forest Park history.

Prior to this role, O’Gorman was an executive with a national fundraising consultant firm. He served as counsel to civic, cultural, educational, healthcare and religious organizations throughout the Midwest and East Coast, managing transformational campaigns that raised more than $600 million for the firm’s clients.

O’Gorman is a member of the St. Louis Chapter of the Association for Fundraising Professionals and has served on its Programming board.

The Ville: Can Community-Based Tourism Revive Public Space in a Historic Black Community?

The Ville is a historic African-American community located in the heart of North St. Louis with a complicated history of triumph from forced segregation of the black community and deterioration from desegregation and divestment of The City of St. Louis. Despite its current distress, The Ville continues to house landmarks that memorialize an amazing story of perserverence and nuture community resilience that has recently led to initiatives that have inspired hopes of reinvigoration. Of those new initiatives, 4theVille, a cross-generational organization started by lifetime residents and young professional community activists, has begun to reclaim and leverage the history of the neighborhood as a galvanizer and catalyst for tourism and economic development. Join Aaron Williams from 4theVille and University of Minnesota Tourism Center Director Cynthia Messer for a tour of The Historic Ville and an introduction to community-based tourism planning.

A National Park Designed for Everyone

Recent renovations of the Gateway Arch National Park grounds increased accessibility for all visitors. This workshop will highlight those changes while exploring this unique landmark.

About the Faclitator:

Lonny Boring, Senior Project Manager, Great Rivers Greenway District: Lonny Boring is Senior Project Manager for Great Rivers Greenway, the St. Louis region’s park and trail agency. Since 2008, he has managed more than $150 million in greenway and infrastructure improvement projects.   He served as Great Rivers Greenway’s lead project manager for the public-private CityArchRiver partnership. This transformational project delivered major improvements to the Gateway Arch National Park including renovations to the historic landscape and expanded museum.   It also included the complete redesign and reconstruction of Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis.  He is currently working to complete the connection between the River des Peres Greenway and Gravois Greenway: Grant’s Trail.  Lonny earned a bachelor’s degree from Missouri University of Science & Technology and a master’s degree from the Nicholas School for the Environment at Duke University.

 

Show Me the Money

You can’t put a price tag on a good walk, but you can find ways to fund the instrastructure and programs that promote walkability. Learn strategies to employ existing funding sources to make your idea a reality.

About the Panel

Greg Harris has been Executive Director of Missouri Rock Island Trail since July 2015. The non-profit coalition of communities, businesses and individuals seeks to preserve the 191 mile former Rock Island Railroad corridor as a recreational trail. The first 47 miles opened in December, 2016 as part of Katy Trail State Park and the next 144 miles is being rail-banked.

Greg had retired from Missouri University of Science & Technology in Rolla, MO as Executive Director of Development after 17 years, working to secure major gifts and planned gifts. Before that, he was Campaign Director for United Way of the Ozarks in Springfield 10 years. He has worked at Walt’s Bike Shop in Columbia, MO, managed Sunshine Cycles in Springfield, MO and Coventry Cycles in Wichita, KS. Greg was a sales rep for Trek in its early years.

In the 1980’s, Greg was honored to volunteer with the late Darwin Hindman to secure endorsements in Springfield, MO for the Katy Trail. That led to serving on the Springfield-Greene County Park Board where Greg successfully proposed they preserve what is now the 35 mile Frisco High Line Trail to Bolivar, MO. That led to co-founding Ozark Greenways. He served a decade on the Trails Advisory Board for Missouri State Parks that awards $1.5 million per year for trails. Greg grew up in car-centric suburban St. Louis and enjoys walking or bicycling most days from his home in Rolla.

Where Can We Go From Here?

Walking is great but can only get you so far. By opening transit doors, communities can open doors to any number of opportunities for school, work, and play.

About the Panel

  • Jacque Knight is a Transportation Planner with CBB. Jacque has a passion for promoting transportation systems that put people first and create walkable, vibrant and healthy communities. She works to support a better quality of life through projects that enhance active transportation and increase access to opportunity. She is a transportation planner at CBB Transportation. Recent and current projects include St. Louis County Action Plan for Walking and Biking, Bevo Great Streets, Collinsville Great Streets, and the Downtown St. Louis Multimodal Plan. Jacque serves as the chair for the Community Mobility Committee, an advisory committee for the City of St. Louis on items related to walking, biking, and micromobility issues. Jacque has a Master of Urban Planning, a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies, all from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS.
  • Rodrigo Reis is Professor of Public Health at the Brown School, Washington University in Saint Louis,  and his research focuses on built and community environment and public health, with particular interest in community interventions for promoting physical activity, the effect of the built environment and active transportation on physical activity and health.

Power to the People

Community engagement strategies are critical in giving voice to those who know best what is needed to make their spaces active and engaged. Learn how to capture the on the ground perspective and work with community members in this session.

About the Panel

Phyllis Viola Boyd is an artist and urban strategist and currently serves as the Executive Director of Groundwork Indy, a non-profit organization that engages youth in community-based projects that equitably enhance environmental, economic, and social well-being.  Before joining Groundwork Indy, Phyllis practiced landscape architecture and urban planning in the for-profit sector, where her work focused on sustainable design and planning and supporting the efforts of diverse communities to transform their built environments into meaningful, relevant, and life-enhancing places.

Shaughnessy Daniels is the Community Engagement Manager at Great Rivers Greenway where she leads the agency’s efforts to gather critical input to guide planning and implementation for greenway projects. Shaughnessy’s career has been focused on strengthening communities and the people that live within them. She has a long history and broad range of experience in non-profit development, community and capacity and local civic efforts. Prior to joining Great Rivers Greenway Shaughnessy served as Vice President of Community Supports at St. Louis Arc, a local non-profit that supports people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and Vice President at Urban Strategies Inc., a national non-profit that provide social and economic supports families affected by broad-scale community redevelopment. Shaughnessy also served as Assistant to the President at St. Louis 2004, a citizen-based initiative to launch major regional revitalization projects.

Sheila Styron works as Blindness Low Vision specialist for The Whole Person, a center for independent living in Kansas City MO, and was the first person who is blind to have become certified as an ADA Coordinator and trainer. She served two terms as president of Guide Dog Users, Inc. and two terms as board chair of Learning Ally, in Los Angeles. Sheila is a strong advocate for eliminating barriers for people living with disabilities, promotes public transportation and worked with the Department of Justice on its revised definition of service animals. Sheila participated in designing accessible tours for the Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the Nelson Atkins in Kansas City and provides accessible outdoor experiences for people who are blind and have low vision. Formerly a professional musician, Sheila enjoys playing the ukulele,yoga and cross-country skiing as well as pursuing adventures like swimming with dolphins and skydiving.

 

Land Use for Walkability

It takes more than infrastructure to create a walkable community. Explore how zoning and other policies and practices related to land-use can have a major impact on how our communities, move, act, and engage in this interactive breakout session.

About the Speaker: Heather Cole Zaccaro is the Program Manager for the National Complete Streets Coalition. They perform quantitative, qualitative, and spatial analysis to support the Coalition’s reports and resources. They also coordinate the Coalition’s ongoing technical assistance programs and co-author articles, case studies, and toolkits. Prior to joining Smart Growth America, they conducted research on health-related behaviors in New York City and Brazil. They hold a Master of Science in City Design & Social Science from the London School of Economics & Political Science and a Bachelor of Science in International Health from Georgetown University.

Places for People

There’s nothing better than seeing people enjoy their public spaces. Community activities of all types can be used to encourage physical activity, social engagement, and mental well-being.

 

About the Panel

Dr. Tom Schmid is Senior Advisor in the Physical Activity and Health Branch in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, CDC. He serves as the CDC technical advisor to America Walks the nation’s premiere walking advocacy and action organization, to PAPREN, a consortium of university-based policy researchers and as a consultant to the Physical Activity Research Center (PARC), a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded effort to identify effective strategies to promote physical activity in poor and underserved minority youth in rural and other communities.

Mark Vogl is a project manager for planning at Great Rivers Greenway where he collaborates with district staff to expand the River Ring, a planned 600-mile system of parks, trails and greenways that will interconnect the St. Louis region. With a background in urban planning and landscape architecture, Mark is responsible for overseeing the planning and design of greenway projects within the District’s master plan. Prior to joining the district in 2013, Mark spent nearly twenty years with HOK and was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Panama. He studied Urban Design at Washington University and received a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from Kansas State University.

Aaron Williams is a community developer and organizer in The Ville neighborhood of St. Louis where he serves on the board of the neighborhood community development corporation Northside Community Housing, Inc. and as a co-founder of 4theVille, a community-based tourism and arts organization. Through these organizations, he has developed several initiatives that emphasize community empowerment and community ownership of public spaces. Two of the more popular initiatives include Northside Trap Run, a hip-hop themed 5K that promotes healthy lifestyles and a healthy north St. Louis, and, The Heart of The Ville walking tours, historic tours that educate attendees about the legacy of the neighborhood while promoting more foot traffic.

The Future of Walkability Is Now

Micro-mobility is sweeping the nation in the form of escooters and bike share programs, but let’s not let this distract from the original form of transportation- walking! Explore issues surrounding walkability and these new forms of transportation as we discuss what we want for the future of our communities.

Active Friendly Routes to Everyday Destinations

People need places to go and healthy ways to get there. A holistic view of community planning creates this and has a wide range of positive impacts on the design of a place.

About the Panel

Holly Moskerintz, Community Programs Outreach Manager, National Association of REALTORS® Holly plans and manages programs to enhance, revitalize and build communities to make them better places to live.  She has been at NAR for over 11 years and has worked on NAR’s Smart Growth, including Placemaking and Walkable Communities, and Housing Opportunities Programs.

Nate Johnson is the President of Real Estate Solutions and works in an Agent Development role, coaching and training agents at Redkey Realty Leaders in St. Louis, MO. Nate served as the 2018 President of the Missouri Association of REALTORS and is the 2020 NAR Liaison for Public & Federal Issues. Nate instructs classes and speaks to groups around the country on a variety of topics including Smart Growth, Fair Housing, Ethics, Business Development & Leadership.

The Bottom Line

Walking is good for your health and the health of your community. Explore ways that investment into walkable communiites is changing the shape and livability of our places.

About the Panel

DARA ESKRIDGE, LEED AP ND, is the Executive Director of Invest STL, a regional initiative to prioritize and support equitable community development in St. Louis. Leading Invest STL, Eskridge directs grantmaking to support neighborhood-based, resident-driven community change. Working with the local philanthropic network, government, banks and universities, she seeks to build a broad coalition of community partners to re-establish the community development ecosystem in St. Louis, centered on policy creation that advances racial equity, civic participation and economic mobility.

Prior to Invest STL, Dara served as Director of Operations for Urban Strategies, a national nonprofit that works with residents, grassroots organizations, local governments and developers to re-build distressed urban core communities into vibrant residential neighborhoods. In addition to overseeing USI’s St. Louis portfolio and team, she led economic development and community engagement for the $30M federal Near North Side Choice Neighborhood initiative in St. Louis. Additionally, Ms. Eskridge formerly served as Senior Planner for the St. Louis County Executive’s Office of Strategy + Innovation where she helped direct regional strategic initiatives, community strategy development and performance measurement for government operations. Previous roles also include serving as a community planner, policy specialist and urban designer with St. Louis County Planning, City of St. Louis Homeless Services and the Bridgeport Housing Authority in Connecticut.

Eskridge earned her graduate degree in Urban Planning from Columbia University in New York and her Bachelor of Architecture from Tuskegee University in Alabama. She is a LEED Accredited Professional for Neighborhood Development.

John O’Gorman leads the ambitious fundraising operations for Forest Park Forever. Since joining Forest Park Forever in January 2012, O’Gorman has overseen the growth of the conservancy’s annual fundraising from $2.2 million to more than $3.2 million, as well as the successful completion of a $130 million capital and endowment campaign, the most ambitious in Forest Park history.

Prior to this role, O’Gorman was an executive with a national fundraising consultant firm. He served as counsel to civic, cultural, educational, healthcare and religious organizations throughout the Midwest and East Coast, managing transformational campaigns that raised more than $600 million for the firm’s clients.

O’Gorman is a member of the St. Louis Chapter of the Association for Fundraising Professionals and has served on its Programming board.

Stronger Together: Building Opportunities for Outdoor Activity and Health

Trails do more than just connect places. They can provide important opportunities to build connections between organizations and people, too. Learn about some existing successful partnerships and the way they are creating active places for health.

About the Panel

  • Ms. Petra Baker has been involved in education for over 27 years. She has spent twenty years at Gateway Michael School, a school that serves medically fragile children with multiple disabilities, ages three through fourteen. She taught for fourteen years as an Early Childhood Special Education Teacher prior to becoming a Principal. Ms. Baker participates in the Healthy Schools Healthy Communities (HSHC) initiative leading the charge in living a healthier life. She has personally lost by walking weekly with her students, exercising with staff, and eating healthier. She spends time in Gateway Michael’s Community Garden with her staff, students, and parents. Through these efforts, this year Gateway Michael was one of only eight schools in the nation and the first and only school in Missouri to be recognized as a Gold School, from the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. Prior to reaching Gold, Gateway Michael School received a Bronze and Silver Award from the Alliance. She holds the following degrees; a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education from Alcorn State University in Lorman, MS, a Masters in Educational Administration and an Education Specialist Degree in Administration from the University of MO, St. Louis.
  • As a Community Health Partner for BJC School Outreach and Youth Development, Erica Oliver convenes community members to promote the process of creating healthy change in the city of St. Louis. Funded by the Missouri Foundation for Health, the Healthy Schools Healthy Communities initiative partners BJC HealthCare with the St. Louis Public School District and communities throughout the city to create opportunities for kids and families to eat healthy and be active.  Prior to her work as a Community Health Partner, Erica was a health educator with BJC School Outreach and Youth Development.  Erica holds a Masters of Arts in Professional Counseling from Lindenwood University and is a Certified Domestic Violence Professional.
  • As the Healthy Schools Healthy Communities Project Director, Leanne White presides over all aspects of the Missouri Foundation for Health, Healthy Schools Healthy Communities grant within the St. Louis Public School District. She facilitates the process of creating healthy change in St. Louis Public Schools, specifically targeting the 11 school sites participating in the Missouri Foundation for Health, Healthy Schools Healthy Communities grant. This unique initiative sponsored by Missouri Foundation for Health allows for the St. Louis Public School District to partner with BJC School Youth and Outreach Development in a comprehensive approach to prevent childhood obesity among students in grades K-8 across the district. Prior to her current position as the HSHC Project Director, Leanne was the Project Director for the Carol M. White, Department of Education PEP grant – AIM for Fitness with St. Louis Public Schools and the Supervisor for K-12 Physical Education and Health. Leanne holds a Masters of Education in Administration from Missouri State University and an Education Specialist Degree in School Administration from Webster University. Leanne has co-authored articles and abstract presentations. Articles published in peer-reviewed journals – Preventing Chronic Disease Public Health Research, Practice, and Policy and PLOS/ONE.

 

 

 

The Power of Representation

Who’s at the table of the walking movement? This session will explore the strategies and success stories of encouraging more people to pull up a chair to the table of walking advocacy.

About the Moderator

Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification. She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.

About the Panel

  • Deidre Brown has a passion for helping people be their best both academically and  physically.  She is a 2016 American Walks Walking College Fellow, a Trailnet Walk/Bike Ambassador, and has been a GirlTrek organizer since 2012.  Deidre promotes living an active lifestyle and acts as an advocate for making communities more livable and accessible for all.Additionally she is a founding member and President of the Riverview Gardens School District’s Foundation. She is an alumna and founding member and Treasurer of the Riverview Gardens High School Alumni Association.  She holds several degrees – a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science, a Graduate Certificate and Master of Science in System Engineering and a Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity. Deidre has been employed with Boeing for 20 years.
  • Kelly McGowan is a proud St. Louisan and health equity advocate for Black communities. Armed with a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science from SLU, and Master of Public Health from Washington University in St. Louis, Ms. McGowan worked as a Health Coordinator in the Harlem Children’s Zone where she facilitated nutrition and fitness education afterschool to students in Central Harlem. Ms. McGowan currently serves as the WEDO Wellness Coordinator, working out of the Emerson YMCA branch of the Gateway Region YMCA (WEDO is an acronym for Women Empowered to End Disparities in Obesity). In her role she works with mothers and caregivers in the Ferguson-Florissant, Normandy, and Riverview Gardens School Districts to create positive and healthy changes in their communities.
  • With more than 25 years of generating market interest, branding visibility, and increased revenue, Felice McClendon, a University of Missouri Journalism graduate brings a multidisciplinary lens to support non-profit strategic planning, organizational development, media engagement, marketing, and public relations needs.
    Married into the Mortuary Business, this Special Needs “Mom on a Mission” is a social justice advocate to support inclusion for diverse abilities populations as well as improved quality of health, in light of the premature rate of morbidity in underserved communities.
    Noted for the capacity to manage complex narratives across local and national media outlets; McClendon launched F.M. Consulting in 2014 to bridge the gap between the boardroom and the neighborhood bloc, to bring cohesion to communities in need and give a voice to the unsung heroes that help from the shadows of inequitable systems.
    Aligning mission and management to passion with purpose; F.M. Consulting serves a robust network of clients from emerging non-profits in need of advisement, board engagement, and development support…to well-known established agencies interested in rebranding, rebuilding, and growing existing programs to a measurable scale.
    Inside the Washington University system, she started her journey as a Community Research Fellow recognized by the School of Medicine, later to follow being asked to serve as co-Chair of the Institute of Public Health and Center for Community Health Partnerships Community Advisory Board (CAB) that serves the gap between community and clinicians. With a history of multi-sector stakeholder relationships, her coordination of people, policies, and resources help organizations serve the greatest need with fidelity, integrity, and plans for sustainability.

Planning for Forgiveness

Pedestrian fatalities are on the rise but we know what needs to be done to halt this disturbing trend. This session will explore the systems changes necessary to begin saving lives today.

About the Panel

  • Eddie Watkins works for Missouri Department of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri. He has been with MoDOT for 5 years. He graduated from Southern University A&M with a B.S. Civil Engineering degree in 2005 and received a Masters in Environmental Engineering degree from Louisiana State University in 2013. As a Senior Traffic Studies Specialist, he is responsible for maintaining an effective traffic system throughout St. Charles County by helping to minimize accidents and ensuring the safe, efficient movement of vehicles, pedestrians, public transit and commodities for the citizens and visitors of St. Louis, Missouri. He is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana and his hobbies are watching football and traveling.
  • Heather Cole Zaccaro is the Program Manager for the National Complete Streets Coalition. They perform quantitative, qualitative, and spatial analysis to support the Coalition’s reports and resources. They also coordinate the Coalition’s ongoing technical assistance programs and co-author articles, case studies, and toolkits. Prior to joining Smart Growth America, they conducted research on health-related behaviors in New York City and Brazil. They hold a Master of Science in City Design & Social Science from the London School of Economics & Political Science and a Bachelor of Science in International Health from Georgetown University.

Walkable Communities for Who?

Walkable communities that are not accessible or inviting to all community members are not walkable. This session will explore the strategies, resources, and considerations necessary to make sure we are achieving our mission of truly walkable places.

About the Panel

  • Lonny Boring, Senior Project Manager, Great Rivers Greenway District: Lonny Boring is Senior Project Manager for Great Rivers Greenway, the St. Louis region’s park and trail agency. Since 2008, he has managed more than $150 million in greenway and infrastructure improvement projects.   He served as Great Rivers Greenway’s lead project manager for the public-private CityArchRiver partnership. This transformational project delivered major improvements to the Gateway Arch National Park including renovations to the historic landscape and expanded museum.   It also included the complete redesign and reconstruction of Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis.  He is currently working to complete the connection between the River des Peres Greenway and Gravois Greenway: Grant’s Trail.  Lonny earned a bachelor’s degree from Missouri University of Science & Technology and a master’s degree from the Nicholas School for the Environment at Duke University.
  • Krista Dye and Carol Griffin of Special Olympics Missouri: Special Olympics Missouri is the world’s largest public health organization and sports organization for people with intellectual disabilities. Our athletes find joy, confidence and fulfillment — on the playing field and in life. They also inspire people in their communities and elsewhere to open their hearts to a wider world of human talents and potential. Many of our athletes come to us with neglected health problems. At State Games and other events, we offer a wide range of free health screenings and care. Our goal is to bring better fitness, nutrition and healthier lifestyles to everyone involved in Special Olympics — from athletes and their families, to coaches and volunteers.

Breaking Down Walls to Take the First Step

There are any number of reasons individuals and communities don’t walk. Explore some of these reasons and what can be done to address them with this session.

About the Panel

Mitch Eagles, Transit Rider Empowerment Project Mitch Eagles is a transit justice activist from St. Louis, and a car-free resident there since 2015. He helped to initiate the Transit Rider Empowerment Project in early 2020, as an effort to amplify the voice of transit riders (and especially bus riders) in demanding the transportation system our city deserves.

Yetunde Janski-Ogunfidodo (Tunde) is a visual/performing artist, equity facilitator and creative consultant who stumbled into the world of philanthropy and artist support through a gallery door. Driven by a love of meaningful experiences and a passion for equity, education, and (local and global) community-building, she has built a career initiating and supporting artist-driven projects that make space for human connections.

Grace Kyung works at Urban Strategies, Inc. as a catalyst in changing how to plan for communities by applying a health and racial equity lens to develop healthy communities. To do this in a just way, she works alongside community members to recognize historical circumstances and the current conditions necessary to achieve equity. Grace is developing the Downtown East St. Louis Transformation Plan that’ll focus on housing, neighborhood, and people strategies to ensure all families are stable and thriving. Grace has received recognition and awards from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Missouri State APA, Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, and the Transportation Research Board. She is also a core-organizer with the Untokening, which is comprised of advocates from diverse social and racial backgrounds who work in professional and personal capacities to advance equity in mobility and community development.

Mia Turner is a Community Health Worker and Generate Health – FLOURISH Initiative Community Champion.

Investing in Rural Communities: The Economic Development and Health Impacts of Trails

The 191-mile Rock Island Trail is expected to breathe new life into dozens of small, rural communities in Missouri, which have been in decline since the days of the railroad. In conjunction with the existing Katy Trail (which has an estimated economic impact of $18.5 million per year) the Rock Island will complete a walking/bicycling loop that traverses more than 300 miles back and forth across the state. This panel discussion will explore the health and economic development benefits of rural trails through the eyes of a researcher, a business entrepreneur, a rural public health professional, and a trails advocate. 

Learning Objectives:

After this panel discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss challenges facing rural communities today
  • Identify general benefits of walking/biking trails in rural communities
  • Give specific examples of trails benefiting rural economic development
  • Give specific examples of trails benefiting rural health
  • Relate the continuing story of the Rock Island Trail

About the Panel

  • Pat Curry: University of Missouri Extension, retired: Pat Curry is an analyst, planner, and entrepreneur with over thirty years of experience helping rural places find solutions to economic development challenges. He has authored over 100 plans and research papers during his career.
    As an entrepreneur he owns and manages a consulting company providing research and planning services to communities and businesses. He has a master’s degree in geography from Southern Illinois University.
  • Greg Harris: Executive Director, Missouri Rock Island Trail: Greg Harris has been Executive Director of Missouri Rock Island Trail since 2015. The non-profit coalition of communities, businesses and individuals seeks to preserve the 191 mile former Rock Island Railroad corridor as a recreational trail. The first 47 miles opened in December, 2016 as part of Katy Trail State Park and the next 144 miles is being rail-banked.
    Greg had retired from Missouri University of Science & Technology in Rolla, MO as Executive Director of Development after 17 years, working to secure major gifts and planned gifts. Before that, he was Campaign Director for United Way of the Ozarks in Springfield 10 years. He has worked at Walt’s Bike Shop in Columbia, MO, managed Sunshine Cycles in Springfield, MO and Coventry Cycles in Wichita, KS. Greg was a sales rep for Trek in its early years.
    In the 1980’s, Greg was honored to volunteer with the late Darwin Hindman to secure endorsements in Springfield, MO for the Katy Trail. That led to serving on the Springfield-Greene County Park Board where Greg successfully proposed they preserve what is now the 35 mile Frisco High Line Trail to Bolivar, MO. That led to co-founding Ozark Greenways. He served a decade on the Trails Advisory Board for Missouri State Parks that awards $1.5 million per year for trails. Greg grew up in car-centric suburban St. Louis and enjoys walking or bicycling most days from his home in Rolla.
  • Kim Henderson is the owner of Kim’s Cabins in Windsor at the crossroads of the Katy and Rock Island trails.  Kim, and Windsor, have seen firsthand the economic impact of what trails can do for a small community.  After starting one cabin in 2015, three more were added by 2018.  Currently folks visit for all different reasons including trails.  Kim was previously City Administrator for the town of 2900, and a banker for 22 years.  Seeing young people come back to buy homes, start businesses, and raise their children in the small town has been one incentive.  Kim also serves on the Board of Missouri Rock Island Trail.
  • Tiffany Rutledge is a Registered Nurse with Capital Region Medical Center in Jefferson City, MO where she manages corporate, community and employee wellness services.  She has spearheaded numerous multi-county community health needs assessments where her skills as a connector have been able to bring together partners in public health, government, business, non-profit organizations, service providers into one space in order to collaborate on issues such as making a community more walkable
  • Ian Thomas, PhD: State and Local Program Director, America Walks: Ian Thomas is the State and Local Program Director with America Walks. In this role, he develops and delivers education programs for advocates, professionals, and elected officials, about the benefits of walkable communities and strategies to create them.
    From 2000 until 2013, Ian served as the founding Executive Director of the PedNet Coalition of Columbia, MO. During this time, he developed one of the largest Walking School Bus programs in the country, coordinated a campaign that led to Columbia adopting the first “complete streets’ policy in Missouri, and was instrumental in reducing neighborhood speed limits.
    In 2013 and again in 2016 and 2019, Ian won election to the Columbia City Council, where he continues to advance healthy and walkable community policies. He is a member of Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council.

 

The Art of Learning…while Walking*

Two hundred people walking and learning about the history of their city and neighborhoods, architectural styles and public art (at the same time)?  And all in 60 minutes?  And free for participants?  It happens in Columbus. A partnership between Columbus Public Health and Columbus Landmarks, a non-profit advocate for historic preservation, created a series of walking tours, “Art Walks and Landmark Talks,” to make summer a time to get people moving.  The workshop’s purpose is to give ideas that can be replicated regarding logistics and costs and to share advantages and obstacles that come with success when a group of 20 walkers on a tour grows after six years to number more than 200.

Attendees of this workshop will be able to:

  • Describe the development and implementation of free walking tours.
  • Discuss successes and challenges associated public walking tours.

Facilitators: Phil Hanson and Doreen Uhas Sauer.

Creating Low Stress Bikeways for All Users*

Active transportation encompasses not just walkability but also bikeability and moveability. Columbus built its first separated bike lanes along Summit Street in the University District in 2016. Extending for almost 1 ½ miles, the bikeway includes a floating parking lane, bicycle signal heads, turn queue boxes, and bus waiting islands. This low-stress bikeway has been a very positive addition to the growing Columbus bikeway network, as well as for people who walk, but has not been without lessons learned and challenges in accommodating all road users.

Creative Revival of the Walkable Neighborhood*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

What happens when one of the most notorious neighborhoods ever is suddenly fair game all at once?  Franklinton suffered a cataclysmic flood in 1913 leading to decades of economic stagnation earning the nickname of “The Bottoms” and a reputation as the place to avoid.  The 2003 completion of the flood-wall was supposed to change all of that over night.  It didn’t. But eventually, art did.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Be bold! Describe how big audacious ideas, if they come from a legitimate place, can change your built environment.
  • Explain why arts and cultural institutions are the best activators of sidewalk life

Facilitator: Jim Sweeney

A Streetscape Transformation in Columbus’ Densest District*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

The High Street Streetscape Improvements project creates a safer, more walkable and even more inclusive neighborhood. The project – located just outside the Hilton Columbus Downtown – is situated in a thriving corridor that’s one of the region’s densest, bustling with residents and visitors nearly all hours of the day. Meanwhile, the broader region is in the midst of a growth spurt, on pace to gain one million additional residents by 2050.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Gain insights on the nuances of designing a streetscape that meets the needs of a growing, dense space which needs to be inclusive of a variety of modes
  • Understand solutions for managing access and engaging the public throughout a very visual construction process

Facilitator: Mindy Justis

Experience the Future of Mobility*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Experience the future of mobility and Columbus at the Smart Columbus Experience Center. Hear from the teams at Smart Columbus and the Central Ohio Transit Authority about the technology that’s helping Columbus smart and pedestrian friendly.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Describe how mobility is the foundation of a smart, inclusive city
  • Discuss how transit is the backbone of any smart mobility strategy
  • Explain how walkability impacts the accessibility of a multi-modal lifestyle

Facilitator: Alyssa Chenault

The Goodale Hook: Tackling Difficult Walkability Gaps with Innovative Solutions*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

The Harrison West community was virtually cut off from Columbus’ major greenway trail network, the Olentangy River, and safe connectivity to nearby downtown.  Two projects, the Harrison West rail trail, and the Goodale connector, brings together a thriving older neighborhood and large scale new mixed use developments by use of a two-stage bridge and an abandoned trail trail.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Understand how community-driven input can energize developers, trail experts, and  urban designers to create bold solutions to a barrier-filled corridor.
  • Identify the tasks, costs, and challenges involved with large-scale pedestrian infrastructure projects.

Facilitators: Katie White and Bradley Westall

The Transformation of the Downtown Columbus Riverfront*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Over the past 20 years, the Downtown Columbus Riverfront has been transformed, with six new riverfront parks that total more than 180 acres of greenspace and restored riparian habitat. Tour participants will visit these riverfront parks to experience the different features of each, from the event pavilion at North Bank Park, to the accessible pedestrian and bicycle pathways along the Scioto Mile, to the signature fountain and restaurant at Bicentennial Park. The crowning achievement in this riverfront renaissance was the removal of the Main Street Dam, which created 33 new acres of park space and restored the river to its original width.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Demonstrate how to plan for and design dynamic river edge parks that enable access for all users.
  • Describe how to remove unnecessary infrastructure to improve river health, riparian edges, and accessibility.

Facilitators: Andrew Overbeck

Arena District: From Brownfield to Thriving Downtown Entertainment Destination*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Discover how the Arena District master plan created a new, mixed-use, walkable, entertainment district on a former brownfield site. Participants will explore the unique connections (I-670 freeway cap and Arena Crossing), park and plaza spaces (McFerson Commons and North Bank Park), and streets (Nationwide Boulevard and Ludlow Alley) that seamlessly integrate the Arena District into downtown. This walking tour will also feature the district’s main attractions, including Nationwide Arena, Huntington Park, the future home of the Columbus Crew, music venues, and many restaurants.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Describe how to integrate a new district into an existing downtown core.
  • Understand how multiple connections and high-quality public spaces can support a pedestrian environment and meet the high automobile needs of an office and entertainment anchored district

Facilitator: Chris Hermann

Jeffrey Park and 4th Street District*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Take a walk from the convention through a bit of the short north to one of Columbus’s bet large scale mixed use developments. Located in Italian Village, Jeffrey Park is situated in a 41 acre urban development less than a mile from Downtown Columbus. This ultra-convenient urban living community features retail, office, single-family homes, condominiums & high-end apartment homes. These 41 acres were once home to Jeffrey Manufacturing during the second industrial revolution, so come learn about how it came to be what it is today.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Explain how public and private partnerships can revive a neighborhood.
  • Discuss the remediation of land that was once the site of a major industrial complex.

Facilitators: Matt Negron and Steve Bollinger

The Discovery Trail*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

The Discovery District is a unique area because it is home to our city’s art museum, four higher education institutions (including Columbus College of Art & Design), the nation’s number one library, two historic districts and two major employers. Currently, the area is not walkable because of the width of Broad Street, poor condition of sidewalks and abundance of surface parking lots. Our goal is to develop a Discovery Trail to improve safety, connectivity and address the barrier of car-centric design. Part of that includes small-scale projects that develop a sense of place and encourage people to explore further.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Explain how improvements in the public right of way, including intersections, can create a sense of place while improving safety and connectivity.
  • Demonstrate small-scale interventions that can build quick support for larger projects

Facilitators: Cass Freeland and Jess Matthews

Urban Abolitionists Talk and Trek*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Join GirlTrek, the largest movement for Black women, and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, the nation’s largest trails organization, in a spirited walk and talk to share great ideas about how to build community using the newly announced Great American Rail-Trail. We will explore a segment of the trail in true GirlTrek style and learn more about the GirlTrek Mission, and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s vision for the Great American Rail-Trail. This trail will be a historically powerful tool that, aligned with the mission of GirlTrek, will continue to unite neighborhoods and communities across the United States for years to come.

Building Connections, Overcoming Barriers

The insight2050 Corridor Concepts brings new tools and modeling capacity to decision about where and how to grow, where to invest transit resources and how to balance community goals.  Walkability is instrumental in the land use, transit and community goals as higher density development and better transit options encourage walking.  In short, walking is embedded in the DNA of the Corridor Concepts and central Ohio’s future.  Learn how the Corridor Concepts have inspired a region to take immediate action in making their community more transit friendly and walkable.

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Moderator: Jennifer Noll,  Principal Planner, Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC

About the Panel

  • Justin Goodwin, AICP is the Transportation Planning Manager for the City of Columbus Department of Public Service. His responsibilities include a wide variety of multi-modal planning and street design initiatives, including long range thoroughfare planning, active transportation systems, and coordination with agency partners such as COTA and MORPC. Justin holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Geography from Ohio University, and a Master of City and Regional Planning from The Ohio State University, where he also periodically teaches. Justin is an advocate for multi-modal commuting, and mixes cycling, transit, driving and shared mobility in his daily and weekly travel.
  • Claudia Husak’s responsibilities as a Planner with the City of Dublin have included work on many aspects of the transformative Bridge Street District, which includes the intent of creating a walkable environment with interconnected streets that can accommodate multiple modes of transportation. As a first for this central Ohio suburb, requirements for Dublin’s new downtown include complete street elements to promote an integrated, balanced, and safe transportation network for all users. Throughout the implementation of development within the Bridge Street District, Claudia and her team have worked with developers and policy makers to ensure that this new and innovative type of development in the City of Dublin includes Complete Streets principles with new roadways that accommodate users of all ages and abilities, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, motorists, persons with disabilities, and adjacent land users.
  • Shannon Sorrell serves as Director of Parks and Recreation with the City of Whitehall.  With a background in public parks and recreation, nonprofit operations, accounting and business administration, Shannon is passionate about her role in redeveloping Whitehall’s park amenities and services alongside a great team of staff, administration and city leadership.
    Shannon enjoys all things outdoors – hiking, camping, fishing, sports and exploring with her kids – and making new programs and experiences a possibility for the families of Whitehall.  With the mantra of “go and do good” and the belief “done is more important than perfect”, the team in Whitehall is making a huge impact across the City.
  • Zach Sunderland, AICP is a Senior Service Planner at the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA).  He has a Bachelor of Science in Urban Planning and a Masters in Community Planning both from the University of Cincinnati.  He is currently a member of American Public Transportation Association (APTA)’s Emerging Leaders Class of 2020.

Collective Action Planning (3:00pm – 4:45pm)

Designed by the local host committee, the collective action workshop will be an opportunity for conference attendees to use their knowledge and experiences to move forward a specific question or issue for the host region/city. These workshops will be hands on exercises designed to develop skills, build connections, provide feedback, and move the needle on walkability.

Lunch Keynote “Where Are We Going” (12:15pm – 1:30pm)

What’s ahead for walking and active transportation in Columbus, across the state, and throughout the US? This plenary will hear from a moderated panel discussion of decision-makers who are at the forefront of shaping our communities and defining our mobility opportunities.

About the Moderator

Update: Toks Omishakin, 43, of Nashville, TN  has been appointed as the new director of the California Department of Transportation. He will start this new journey late October 2019. Omishakin has been Deputy Commissioner for Environment and Planning Bureau at the Tennessee Department of Transportation since 2011.  He was director of Healthy Living Initiatives in the Nashville Mayor’s Office from 2008 to 2011.  Omishakin earned a Master of Arts degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Jackson State University.

In October of 2011, Toks Omishakin was appointed Assistant Commissioner and Chief of Environment and Planning at the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT). In this position, he leads TDOT’s continued success in establishing environmental, multi-modal and transportation planning policies necessary to make it one of the best state DOT’s in the country. He is responsible for the bureau’s administrative and project budget that exceeds $300 million annually. He leads the activities of the divisions of Environmental Services, Long-Range Planning, and Multimodal Transportation Resources. In 2014, he was promoted to Deputy Commissioner at TDOT.

Prior to joining TDOT, he served as the Director of Healthy Living Initiatives in the Office of Mayor – Karl Dean in Nashville, Tennessee. There he led efforts to develop Metro Nashville’s – Complete Streets Policy and helped establish a more balanced approach to transportation planning and design for the city. He also spearheaded the creation of two Bicycle Sharing programs (Nashville BCycle and Nashville Green Bikes) for the city. He was the Mayor’s liaison to several organizations and boards created to improve livability, the built environment, and transportation. Omishakin has been a speaker and presenter at several national and international conferences and his work has been published in The American Journal of Preventative Medicine and profiled in The Wall Street Journal, HBO Documentaries and Newsweek magazine.

He was appointed by Governor Bill Haslam to the Board of the Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway Authority in 2012 and the Governor’s Rural Development Task Force in 2015. He also serves on the Board of Directors at America Walks, the Civil Engineering and Environment Advisory Board at Tennessee Tech University and is Co-Chair of the Tennessee Regions Roundtable Network. He is an active member of the American Planning Association (APA), and the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE). He holds a Master’s Degree in Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) with concentrations in transportation planning and urban design from Jackson State University, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Technology from Mississippi Valley State University.

About the Panel

State Rep. Randi Clites (D-Ravenna) is a proven leader and tireless advocate for her community. She currently represents Ohio’s 75th House District, which includes much of central and southern Portage County.

A grassroots advocate at heart, Rep. Clites began her activism when her son was diagnosed with a rare genetic bleeding disorder—then leukemia—at a young age. She has since dedicated herself to giving back to the community that has given her so much, fighting to increase access to quality, affordable healthcare, improve community services and make Ohio a national leader in advanced energy technology.

Rep. Clites has worked as Associate Director of the Northern Ohio Hemophilia Foundation, Advocacy Coordinator for the Ohio Bleeding Disorders Council and has represented Ohio through the Association of Maternal and Child Health Family Scholar Program.

Clites served on the 2006 Legislative Task Force on the Future Funding of the state’s Title V program, where she fought for Ohio’s most vulnerable children. She has also served as Chair of the Parent Advisory Council. Clites received the Advocate of the Year award from the National Hemophilia Foundation for her continued work to increase awareness at the local, state and national levels.

In addition, she has been an active volunteer in her community, working with Akron Children’s Hospital, Portage County Big Brothers and Sisters and as a long-time softball coach in her community.

Randi, her husband Matt, her son Colton, and their two dogs are lifelong residents of Portage County.

Lloyd MacAdam, ODOT Chief Engineer, is a 22-year veteran with ODOT’s management team.

Prior to his appointment as Chief Engineer, he served 7 years as District 11’s Deputy Director, he served the department as a Regional Projects Manager for ODOT’s Northeast Ohio’s Real Estate Office in Akron. He also served as Production Administrator for District 11 for over 5 years.

Prior to his career in ODOT, Lloyd worked for the City of Akron Bureau of Engineering, the Summit County Engineer’s office, 4 different Engineering Design firms and was a full time professor at the Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus in the Engineering Technology Department.

MacAdam graduated from the University of Akron in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. In addition to being a professional engineer, MacAdam also has his professional surveyor’s license and was a 2008 graduate of Ohio’s Certified Public Manager Program.

He and his wife, Carol, reside in New Philadelphia, Ohio and have raised four sons and are the proud grandparents of 4 wonderful grandchildren.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine nominated Mary Mertz as Director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.

Mertz served as the First Assistant Attorney General under Mike DeWine in the Attorney General’s Office, where she oversaw both the legal and administrative operations of the office.

She has extensive legal experience in both the private and public sectors, having practiced law at a large multi-national firm.

Mertz also served as chief of staff to Mike DeWine while he was Lt. Governor; as the legislative director to Congressman Bob McEwen; in the office of legislative affairs in the White House; and worked with the Department of Natural Resources while working for Ohio Gov. George V. Voinovich.

Mertz is an avid sailor and outdoorsperson.

State Senator Steve Wilson is currently serving his first term in the Ohio Senate, representing all or part of Butler, Hamilton and Warren counties.

An Ohio native and long-time Warren County resident, Senator Steve Wilson has built a career of dedicated service to both his community and his profession. From the time he was honorably discharged as a Naval Officer in 1975, Senator Wilson focused his efforts on an entry-level position at Lebanon Citizens National Bank (LCNB) and public service in his community.

Forty-one years later, Mr. Wilson is the recently retired CEO of LCNB Corp. and LCNB National Bank. He continues in his position of chairman of the board. Although he has stepped away from his daily professional responsibilities, he continues to participate in important positions of service in Warren County and southwestern Ohio.

Senator Wilson has always sought to give back to the community, making it a better place to live, work and raise a family. He believes that quality education and schools, as well as responsible community planning and creating good-paying jobs, are the tenets to growing a strong living and working environment for all Ohioans.

Throughout Senator Wilson’s career in both the business and volunteer sectors, one practice has been consistent: he has never assumed that he understood all of the workings of any particular organization. When he made a commitment, he would immerse himself in learning everything he could about that group. A prime example of his willingness to learn was his accepting an entry-level position as a teller at the LCNB.

Senator Wilson and his wife, Jill, live in Maineville. They have four children and five grandchildren and are active members of the Otterbein United Methodist Church.

Opening Ceremony and Welcome – “The Story of Place” (8:00am-9:00am)

Today we face challenges in how we design and use our cities to support safe mobility, thriving economies, and the physical, mental and social well-being of all community members. This panel will look at some of the ways we can design our public space, engage our communities, and prepare for the towns of tomorrow.

About our Speakers

Urban Designer Mukul Malhotra develops innovative solutions for the new American City.  As a Principal at MIG, Inc., his award-winning designs have created thriving downtowns and historic districts as well as livable new communities and university campuses. His work has inspired urban revitalization, multimodal connectivity, sustainability, community inclusivity, and preservation of historic and neighborhood character. He is co-author of Streets Reconsidered: Inclusive Design for the Public Realm. He currently serves as President of America Walks – a national organization that is committed to increasing walking and walkability in America.

Health Commissioner Dr. Mysheika W. Roberts leads Columbus Public Health and a team of nearly 500 public health professionals who are focused on neighborhood-based approaches that address the social determinants of health,  from safe, affordable housing and education to jobs and violent crime, in order to decrease the health disparities that exist.

Dr. Roberts has a prolific 18-year public health background at the local, state and national levels. Prior to her appointment as Health Commissioner in December 2017, she was the Medical Director and Assistant Health Commissioner at Columbus Public Health. She also built a solid foundation in public health early in her career by investigating outbreaks in Ohio for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and leading an STD clinic and hepatitis prevention efforts at the Baltimore City Health Department.

Dr. Roberts extends her service to the community beyond the walls of Columbus Public Health where she is active on several boards, including the Columbus Medical Association Foundation, YWCA of Columbus and the Mid-Ohio Food Bank, as well as the Lifeline of Ohio Minority Advisory Group and OhioHealth’s Faith, Culture and Community Benefit Committee. She also serves as a mentor in OhioHealth’s Physician Diversity Scholars Program.

She earned her MD from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and her MPH from the University of Michigan.

A native of Los Angeles, she now calls Columbus home and enjoys spending down time with her husband Edward and their dogs Cosby and Rudy.

Jim Sweeney, a lifelong Columbus resident, became Executive Director of the Franklinton Development Association Community Development Corporation in 2002, one year before the completion of the Franklinton floodwall. In his 14 years in that role Jim led the effort to revitalize Franklinton through creation of over 150 affordable housing units, various community building activities including founding the Franklinton Arts District, and aggressive neighborhood advocacy on all levels. Jim moved Franklinton, aka “The Bottoms”, to the center of the discussion about central-Ohio development. He built consensus around the revitalization of East Franklinton as an arts destination, an initiative which gained support of city hall and has now begun the path to reality.  Jim is active on several boards including the Columbus Landmarks Foundation and the Franklinton Arts District.

He current operates as Sweeney & Associates, a neighborhood revitalization/creative community consultancy. The firm draws on the talents that established Franklinton as an arts destination. Services include revitalization planning, creative placemaking, and “making” a makerspace.

Planning for Tomorrow, Today

We don’t know what the future will hold, but we do know some of the challenges we will face. Plans to face those challenges need to happen now and will be explored in this session.

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Moderator: Kevin Mills, Vice President of Policy, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

About the Panel

  • Chris Hermann is a principal with MKSK and a certified city planner with more than 28 years of planning experience. Chris has managed a wide variety of projects throughout the Midwest, Midsouth, and Ohio involving regional planning policy, comprehensive plans, downtown and focus area plans, community improvement, economic development, transportation planning, and public engagement and facilitation. Chris has led MKSK project teams for several award-winning transportation, street connectivity, and complete street improvement plans including the I-670 Design Enhancement Study, the Bike New Albany Plan, and the nationally-recognized Long Street Bridge and Cultural Wall. Chris is also an adjunct faculty member of the Ohio State University’s Knowlton School of Architecture, a board member of Transit Columbus, and a member of the ULI Transportation Task Force.
  • Jeff Kupko is an Associate with Michael Baker International with 14 years of experience. He is in Michael Baker’s emerging technology practice and leads the smart communities initiatives. Currently, he sits on site at Smart Columbus as a City project manager and is responsible for leading the AV shuttle and Smart Mobility Hubs projects. He has a bachelors and masters of civil engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, is a licensed PE in four states, and a licensed PTOE.
  • Steven Streit is the mayor of Lockport, Illinois, a historic canal town of 25,000 residents along the Des Plains River. Streit was a machinist in the U.S. Navy, a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and, for the last twenty years, has run his marketing and design firm, oh!Design, Inc.Before running for mayor, Streit volunteered on many of Lockport’s community organizations. Finally being fed up with a dysfunctional city council, he ran for office in 2013. Streit is now mid-way through his second term.

Designing for All Ages: Accessibility and Inclusion Through Walkability

Communities that are designed with our youngest and oldest community members in mind are inevitably safer and more accessible for all. Learn from innovative programs and projects that are working to make sure communities are places for people of all ages.

Moderator: David Dixon FAIA, Vice President, Planning and Urban Design Leader Stantec’s Urban Places

About the Panel

  • Tiwana Henderson serves as the Administrative Assistant to the Center for Surgical Outcomes Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Recently in partnership with Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, Tiwana has designed, strategized and implemented PlayStreets on Whittier. Tiwana’s passion in life is to open up a world of possibility for the next generation.
  • Nick Jones serves as Director of the Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families initiative at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. In his time with Nationwide Children’s, Nick has overseen significant program growth addressing health equity and social determinants of health issues through affordable housing, employment, education, safety, and wellness interventions. Prior to his role at Nationwide Children’s, Nick served as Chief Operating Officer for Boys & Girls Clubs of Columbus. Nick has over thirteen (13) years of professional experience in social services and healthcare administration. Nick is married with one child. He holds a J.D. and M.B.A.
  • Katie White is the Director of Age-Friendly Communities at The Ohio State University College of Social Work. Ms. White graduated with a degree in gerontology and has spent her career working and volunteering with older adults. Her experience in person-centered program development at the Alzheimer’s Association sparked an ongoing passion for elevating the voice of older adults in the community, which was further strengthened in her role as founding Executive Director of Village Connections. Her dedication to inclusive-planning served as the foundation for the Age-Friendly Columbus initiative within the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission and continues to guide her daily work advocating with and for older adults.

 

A Culture of Health

Walking is a great way to change the health of an individual and a community with a single step. This session will explore programs and partnerships that help to get community members moving, improving the physical, mental, and social well-being of all.

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Moderator: Wendy Landman, Executive Director, WalkBoston

About the Panel

Chyna- Lloyd Nicole Johnson serves as Director of Impact at GirlTrek. She joined GirlTrek in 2017 as the Summer Fellow while completing her graduate degree at Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. During her time in GirlTrek she has served in several roles. The latest being the Director of Data Management where she oversaw management of GirlTrek internal systems, information management and administrative program support.

In her current role as Director of Impact she oversees the development and implementation of the systems and tools that identify and capture the depth and breadth of GirlTrek’s impact. In this role she is responsible for the collection, management, and analysis of impact data and works closely with the each facet of the GirlTrek team.

Chyna is originally from Columbus, Ohio. She received her Bachelors of Arts in Chemistry and African & African American Studies from Berea College in Berea, Kentucky and earned her Master of Public Health from Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She now resides in the Atlanta area.

Larry Smith founded the German Village Walking Club in 2015 after he and his wife sold their house in the suburbs, and moved to downtown Columbus to live their empty-nester dreams! Smith, a chemical engineer by training, is a leading expert in Brownfield redevelopment. His particular focus is helping small communities in Ohio turn run-down and abandoned properties in the urban core, back to beneficial reuse such as parks and mixed use development. When not working or walking, Smith loves to travel with his wife to visit their two adult children and families in Chicago and Vermont.

David Sabgir, M.D., a Columbus, Ohio, native and full-time cardiologist at Mount Carmel Health System, founded Walk with a Doc in 2005 after becoming frustrated by his inability to affect behavior change in a clinical setting.  Many years later, Dr. Sabgir continues to personally invite his patients to walk alongside him as a Walk with a Doc leader.

As CEO of Walk with a Doc, Dr. Sabgir cultivates a strategic vision for the organization, develops vital partnerships and educates others about the medical benefits of movement and social connection.  He absolutely loves Walk with a Doc and sees it as an important next step in care of our communities.

 

From Policy to Practice: Policies and Programs to Support Active Transportation

Political will and institutional support is important for growing active transportation networks. Policies such as Complete Streets, Vision Zero, and more can be building blocks to active commutes. Learn more on how these policies get turned into action at this session.

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Moderator: Kevin Mills, Vice President of Policy, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

About the Panel

  • Jennifer Alford is a civil engineer with more than 22 years of design and analysis experience in traffic, highway, and site/civil engineering. She holds professional licenses as Professional Engineer and Professional Traffic Operations Engineer. Jennifer has served as the City of Westerville’s Traffic Engineer since December 2017, where her role involves being a problem solver, human psychologist (understanding people’s interesting driving habits) and an integral part of the city design team to develop safe and people-friendly environments. Her current projects include Westerville’s Strategic Mobility Plan, along with signage, intersection, signals, speed limit, and multi-mode integration management.Jennifer volunteers as Webmaster for the Great Lakes District of the Institute of Transportation Engineers, and has been involved with many engineering organizations over the years – including the American Society of Highway Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, Women’s Transportation Seminar, and Engineers Without Borders. In 2006, she was named the Ohio Young Engineer of the Year by the Ohio Society of Professional Engineers for the State of Ohio and Franklin County, and served the Engineers’ Club of Columbus as president in 2006-2007. She is a graduate of the Ohio State University.
  • Alexandra Petrella is an Associate Planner at the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), where she coordinates the Transportation Demand Management Strategic Plan to mitigate single occupancy vehicle use and improve air quality for the Central Ohio Region. Alexandra also focuses on alternative transportation planning and works with regional partners to encourage smart growth and sustainability through innovative education and outreach initiatives.
    Alexandra previously served as a Transportation Planner for VN Engineers, where she studied crash data and field analyses to make design recommendations to multi-modal facilities that improve safety and livability for Connecticut road users. She is a graduate of The Ohio State University with a degree in City and Regional Planning.
  • Dr. Katherine Swidarski recently earned her PhD from The Ohio State University in Public Health. She has a background in social psychology and health behavior change with a minor in city and regional planning. She has served as the Program Manager for the Columbus Safe Routes to School program since August 2017. In her role, she works collaboratively with the Columbus City School District, various City of Columbus Departments, and neighbors of Columbus to advance policy, systems and environmental changes for the safety of children. Before moving to central Ohio, Swidarski spent 10 years advancing safe routes county-wide in Miami-Dade, Florida and San Francisco, California.

Towards Zero Deaths: Improving Pedestrian Safety within Ohio

Over the last ten years, Ohio has seen a significant increase in the number pedestrians being killed or seriously injured on our roadways. This session will explore the factors underlying this increase and highlight projects being undertaken at the state, regional and local level to address them.

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About the Panel

  • Lauren Cardoni is a senior planner with the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), where she works to improve active transportation and transportation safety for the Central Ohio region. Lauren manages the safety program at MORPC, which includes development of the regional safety plan, annual analysis of regional crash data, and providing technical assistance to local governments. Lauren also coordinates the various active transportation programs and regional active transportation planning efforts conducted by MORPC.
  • Tricia Fought is the traffic studies engineer with the City of Columbus, Division of Traffic Management. She supervises a team of engineers and associates who collect and analyze all facets of traffic data.  The results reveal if current or projected traffic conditions warrant changes to the city’s infrastructure to promote the safe travel of all users.  When changes are warranted, Tricia works closely with the Administration to set project priorities and determine appropriate funding sources.
  • Jordan Whisler is with the Ohio Department of Transportation and where he manages ODOT’s Local Safety and Active Transportation programs and serves as the state’s pedestrian coordinator. In his role, Jordan focuses on initiatives related to statewide pedestrian and bicycle planning, multi-modal facility design, non-motorized data collection, and active transportation funding.

The Shape of Our Communities: Zoning and Land-Use for Walkability

At the foundation of every community is the ground we walk on. Learn how zoning and other policies related to land-use can have a major impact on how our communities move, act, and engage.

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Moderator: Dr Thomas Schmid, PhD, Senior Advisor, Physical Activity and Health Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

About the Panel

  • Ted Beidler is the Mobility Engineer for the Franklin County Engineer’s Office in Columbus, Ohio. He has been working in the bridge and highway industry for 28 years. His responsibilities include the planning, funding and project management of roadway and bridge projects within Franklin County. He has worked extensively with other government agencies and private parties to construct over 100 projects varying from simple culvert replacements to new, multi-lane roadways. Ted is also a board member with Central Ohio Greenways and is playing a role in that group’s effort to expand the trail system throughout the 7-county central Ohio area.Ted holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from The Ohio State University and an M.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Kansas. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Ohio. Ted and his wife Jennifer spend their spare time on their tandem bicycle riding all of the “rail-trails” they can find within driving distance of Columbus.
  • Robert Ferrin, Assistant Director for Parking Services, Columbus, OH As the Assistant Director for Parking Services, Robert oversees the administration, enforcement, operations, and management of public parking for the City of Columbus.  Robert and his team are leading efforts to increase mobility options and parking access to support the growth and development of the City through initiatives including the Short North Parking Plan and Strategic Parking Plan.  Robert moved to Columbus in late 2017 from Colorado, where he spent nearly seven years working in various parking leadership roles with the City and County of Denver as their Manager of On-Street Programs and the City of Aurora as their Parking & Mobility Manager.
  • Marta Goldsmith, Executive Director, Form-Based Codes Institute at Smart Growth America Ms. Goldsmith is Executive Director of the Form-Based Codes Institute (FBCI) at Smart Growth America, where she directs FBCI’s technical assistance, professional development, award program and other activities. Prior to joining Smart Growth America, Ms. Goldsmith was Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at LRG, Inc. a public affairs and nonprofit management firm. Ms. Goldsmith has served as Senior Adviser to the Commissioner of the Public Buildings Service, GSA and as Chief Operating Officer of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, a global NGO that provides technical expertise to accelerate the growth of sustainable transport and urban development around the world.
    Prior to her tenure at GSA and ITDP, Marta worked at the Urban Land Institute, where she was responsible for a wide range of programs during her 22-year tenure including land use policy research and publications, advisory services, community outreach, professional development, fundraising and international programs. Marta also served as Executive Director of the Southern Governors Association and as Special Assistant to the Governor of Florida for community and economic development, housing, and transportation issues.
    She taught graduate planning courses at the University of Virginia and was selected as a W.K. Kellogg National Leadership Fellow. Marta earned her master’s degree in City Planning from Harvard University and a BSc in Sociology from Indiana University.
  • Planner and lawyer Sean Suder is Lead Principal of Calfee Zoning, a zoning consultancy affiliated with the Ohio-based law firm of Calfee, Halter & Griswold, LLP.  He leads the law firm’s zoning practice and consults with local governments across Ohio and the eastern United States to craft clear, consistent, usable and defensible zoning codes that respect existing while promoting desired development patterns.
    From 2010 to 2014, he served as the Chief Counsel of Land Use and Planning for the City of Cincinnati where he represented the municipal corporation and its officials in all planning, land use, zoning, historic preservation and building matters.  In that role, Sean served as lead counsel for the award-winning Cincinnati Form-Based Code.  He also served as the lead counsel for the Cincinnati Land Development Code, a new take on the City’s remaining Euclidean zoning, and for the City’s award-winning Historic Preservation ordinance.
    In addition to speaking on the topic of zoning at national, regional and local planning and zoning conferences, he has served as Ohio faculty for the Form-Based Code Institute, an adjunct professor of land use law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, and has been a guest lecturer at the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Art, Architecture and Planning.  His articles have been published in the Cincinnati EnquirerMidwest Real Estate NewsCities & Villages MagazineOhio Planners News, and others.
    Sean is licensed to practice law in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and the District of Columbia.  He was recognized by Chambers USA, Real Estate: Zoning/Land Use, 2019, and for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© 2019 in the areas of Real Estate Law and Zoning Law.

Walk to the Future

The vision of Smart Columbus is to demonstrate how the future of mobility can empower all residents to live their best lives.  Join the Smart Columbus team and pilot participants to learn how Columbus is accelerating human progress through open mobility for all.

About the Moderator:

Alyssa Chenault, Communications Project Manager, Smart Columbus City of Columbus Alyssa Chenault (She/Her/Hers) is the Communication Project Manager for the Smart Columbus initiative. Alyssa leads public outreach and consumer adoption efforts for the Smart Cities Challenge portfolio of projects funded by the U.S Department of Transportation.

About the Panel

Julie Faieta is a licensed occupational therapist and full time PhD candidate in Ohio State’s Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Program. Julie’s primary area of research is in the development and evaluation of assistive and pervasive technology-based interventions to address health span and quality of life in neurodegenerative population and their caregivers, with a specific interest in Alzheimer’s disease and sleep focused interventions. Julie is interested in developing intervention protocols that can be effectively implemented to those at risk of disease development and at each stage of the disease progression. In addition to her academic pursuits, Julie has also maintained active involvement in the American Congress of Rehabilitative Medicine’s Neurodegenerative Networking Group as the chair of the Alzheimer’s Disease Task Force and as the Social Media Officer.  At the university level, Julie serves as the Council of Graduate Students Health and Rehabilitation Sciences delegate.

John Lathram moved to the North Linden area in 1995 because of its affordability and proximity to Downtown Ohio State University where he served as an adjunct professor in the Art Department.

John has been an active member of the North Linden area, where he serves as block watch captain and Social Media Director for the North Linden Community Watch. He joined the commission in 2015 moving up the ranks to Chair this year

His dedication to Linden is to make sure that every resident of Linden has the necessary tools to ensure affordable, clean and safe housing, reducing infant mortality in the community by making sure expectant mothers have access to proper nutrition, medical care via transportation to medical appointments and educational needs for all families in Linden.

Mr. Lathram served on Mayor Ginthers Advisory Council for the revitalization plan for Linden , the Diversity Chamber of Central Ohio and serves as the Smart Columbus liaison for North Linden, where his focus is to increase the use of public transportation resources that will soon be available to them. He would like new developers moving to the neighborhood to begin to think about the walkability factor in our neighborhood, which is currently one of the lowest in the city, by encouraging and welcoming minority owned businesses to Linden and provide the healthy resources they need.

Mr. Lathrams vision for a better Linden requires all of our community to join together in making Linden a great place to live, love, work and play in the healthiest way possible.

From the First Step: Celebrate One

Celebrate One believes that the greatest gift our community can give each baby is a healthy and safe first year of life that sets him or her on a path to thrive each year beyond that. Learn how this program is starting infants and families on a healthy path and the impact it is having across communities.

On the Same Team: Decision-Makers and Advocates Together for Walkable Communities

When decision-makers and advocates come together, magic happens. This session will look at the tools and resources available to help create meaningful communication between elected officials and other stakeholders and showcase examples of when it has worked well.

About the Panel

Council President Pro Tempore Elizabeth Brown, City of Columbus In addition to her local elected official role, Brown is the Executive Director of the Ohio Women’s Public Policy Network, a member of the Columbus Women’s Commission and serves on the CelebrateOne Policy Committee. She formerly worked as an economic development manager to the City of Columbus, taught middle school students as a City Year Americorps member and has been published in New York Magazine and WOSU Public Radio. President Pro Tem Brown’s core objective on Council is to fight for broad-based economic prosperity and job creation that addresses both business growth and poverty reduction.

Council Member Emily Keeler, City of Grandview Heights Keeler has a passion for bike and walk safety and improving communications and transparency. In her Council role, she serves as the liaison for the Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), Finance Committee Chair and Traffic Advisory Group member. Keeler’s full-time job at The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy as Wellness and Community Builder allows her to connect people within Ohio State to the community at large, and she is a member of the Association of Staff and Faculty Women Board of Directors and the Ohio State Medicine and the Arts Board.  She has a deep passion for promoting healthy communities.

Founder John H. Gregory, National African American Male Wellness Initiative Gregory is known as “The Solutions Man” and is passionate about urban issues. Founder and CEO of the National Center for Urban Solutions and the Academy for Urban Scholars, he has a national reputation for his work as a social entrepreneur that has been recognized with the Business First Health Hero, Best Practice Model for the Department of Labor and Housing Urban Development and the Governor’s Excellence in Public Service Awards. Gregory’s success in creating opportunities for improved health and increased employment has been via forming effective partnerships with corporate and community organizations.

Executive Director Catherine Girves, Yay Bikes! Innovatively promoting safe active transportation experiences in Central Ohio, Girves has realized significant achievements heading up a non-profit organization with a mission to support people through the tools of education and advocacy. Among the creative strategies she employs to engage decision makers are professional development rides with engineers, planners and government officials. Girves serves on the Central Ohio Greenways Board and is a resourceful and energetic team leader with a record of inspiring volunteers to create and operate award winning programs as well as collaborating in service to the common good.

Manager of Government Affairs Jason Warner, Greater Ohio Policy Center Warner advocates for issues and policy positions at the Statehouse, and he brings more than 15 years of experience working in and around Ohio state government. For more than eight years, he served as a legislative aide in the Ohio House of Representatives, working on a wide array of policy matters including community revitalization, economic development, housing, education and transportation. A former staff assistant to the House Ways & Means Committee and House Finance Transportation Subcommittee, Warner also worked for more than two years addressing issues before the Joint Committee on Agency Rule Review.

Council President Brian Housh, Village of Yellow Springs Housh is an avid trail user, Midwest Policy Manager for Rails-to-Trails Conservancy and a Miami Valley Regional Planning Executive Committee Member. His active-transportation lifestyle is supported by residing along the Little Miami Scenic Trail, part of the nation’s largest paved trail network. Housh is deeply engaged in economic development initiatives emphasizing strategies that enhance quality of life, create jobs and increase commerce via arts, culture and environmental sustainability; he spent 12 years in Thailand managing his corporate communications training consultancy and leading the American Chamber’s charitable efforts.

Creating Creative Places

Walkable communities are places that cultivate and celebrate creativity. This session will examine how communities are using art and placemaking to build connections and foster activity.

Moderator: Mukul Malhotra, Principal, MIG

About the Panel

  • Matt Leasure is a certified planner and professional landscape architect with 16 years of experience on a variety of urban design, parks and recreation, and private development projects. He is a Principal of Designing Local, where he leads projects which focus on placemaking and public space design. He is a proponent of public engagement as a fundamental element of the creative process and strives to weave local storytelling into each project. Matt serves as Advocacy Chair for Columbus Landmarks, Central Ohio’s primary historic preservation and urban design advocacy group, and is a lecturer at OSU’s Knowlton School of Architecture.

  • Jess Mathews’ passion and commitment toward people-centered places is unparalled. Through community engagemtn and building bulldog persistence, Jess creates places in our community where people interact with each other and the environment. She has achieved great success with her ‘PlaceMakes’ initiative which includes the West Cherry St ‘Re-Imagined’ Project, the 4th St, Gay St. and Franklinton Parklets, and her recent work at The Gravity mixed-use development project. The success of her many ‘citizen-led’ projects has motivated her to start her own consulting business: Epic Small Consulting. Epic Small helps communities execute small-scale placemaking projects that brings people joy, and helps move the needle toward more inclusive community design. Jess is also a bicycle advocate and has been featured at TEDx Columbus.
  • Jamie McMillen is the Vice President of Government Affairs for the Akron Cleveland Association of Realtors. Since late 2009, Jamie has spearheaded fundraising efforts for the Realtors PAC totaling more than $1 million. She has worked with officials at every level of government to protect private property rights, remove barriers to homeownership, and ensure northeast Ohio is “Home for All.” Under Jamie’s leadership, ACAR has partnered on placemaking projects in Akron, Cleveland, Euclid, Maple Heights, and South Euclid. She currently serves as the chair of the Ohio Realtors Equal Opportunity & Diversity Forum and is the Ohio representative to the Realtor Party Member Involvement Committee at the National Association of Realtors. A native of Cadiz (kad-IZ), Ohio, McMillen has a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Mount Union. In her spare time, she volunteers with the National Cabinet of Mount Union Women and Keep Akron Beautiful. She lives in the Firestone Park region of Akron with her Boxer (Ziggy) and Siamese (Jax).

Every Body Walk!: Collaborating and Connecting for the Walking Movement (4:00pm-5:30pm)

September 14

Important goals and strategies of the Every Body Walk! Collaborative and “Step it Up! The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities” include 1) making walking a national priority and 2) creating a sustainable national walking movement. For these to be achieved, the movement needs to take root and have ownership and leadership at national, regional, and state levels.

This panel will hear from people who have worked to create networks and coalitions at the national, regional, and state levels to offer insight as to how partnership can grow the power of walking. Attendees will have the opportunity to connect with other advocates from their state and region to take part in a discussion on actions needed for their own communities.

Room: Governors 4

Presenters:

 

  • Kelly Corbin, Physical Activity Coordinator, Minnesota Department of Health
  • Amber Dallman, Minnesota Department of Transportation
  • Pam Eidson, National Physical Activity Society
  • James Kissee, Washington State
  • Kate Kraft, America Walks
  • Tyler Norris, Chief Executive, Well Being Trust

Girding the Movement to Take Action on Key Emerging Trends (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

America Walks is excited to use the 2017 National Walking Summit as an opportunity to bring together leaders in the walking movement to create tangible and actionable goals for collective action. This session will briefly examine leading trends shaping the walking movement and priorities for action identified by America Walks. This session will engage participants in an interactive ‘America Walks Café’ where attendees will discuss and provide input on strategic actions for a Call to Action to be released at the end of the conference with the goal of strengthening and guiding the walking movement.

Room: Governors 4

Facilitators and Representatives of America Walks Board:

  • SteVon Edwards, MPH, Lead Consultant, Schenault Solutions, LLC
  • Dr. Lawrence D. Frank, PhD, AICP, ASLA, President, Urban Design 4 Health, Inc & University of British Columbia 
  • Kevin Mills, Senior Vice President of Policy, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
  • Molly O’Reilly, Board Member, America Walks
  • Kathy Smith, Program Director, Partners for Health Foundation

Juliette Rizzo

A widely recognized and visible champion, national spokesperson and enthusiastic advocate for disability rights, deeply committed to educating the public and bringing mainstream visibility to issues that impact the disability community and the greater community at large, Juliette Rizzo knows firsthand the power of transforming limitations into opportunity.

Juliette acquired three physical disabilities (juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and fibromyalgia) in her youth but refuses to define herself by traditional barriers and preconceptions. Using her greatest gift, namely her ability to tell her story of true physical and emotional recovery with strength, courage and hope, she has inspired thousands as the former Ms. Wheelchair America, encouraging others to find their own courage, share their vision and help her change the world.

As one of Maryland’s Top 100 Women, Juliette also is an award-winning public relations professional, employed as the Director of Special Projects, Partnerships and Events in the U.S. Department of Education in Washington, D.C., engaging others in the President’s and Secretary’s national education agenda. From concept to crowd building, production to pre-show, as well as site selection and on-site management, Juliette has an extensive track record of directing and planning high-profile special events. From building an event for First Lady Michelle Obama in the East Room of the White House to designing a STEM event with Ivanka Trump at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, to co-directing an historic commemoration of the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, complete with the original “Freedom Riders” of yesterday and 75 young freedom riders of today, who boarded buses, or “rolling classrooms,” in front of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building for a symbolic and celebratory “return to freedom” ride to the governor’s mansion in Richmond, VA, Juliette’s work has received national and international media attention.

Recently, Juliette was awarded the first RISE Forward Award in Loudoun County, Virginia for her work engaging American high school theater students, working uniquely with a sister school in Canada via Skype, in the White House arrival ceremony of the Prime Minister of Canada. In addition, her work extending the reach of the White House Easter Egg Roll to school districts across Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia also was recognized with the Assistant Secretary’s Award for Communications. Other events in her portfolio include Presidential State Arrival Ceremonies (for the Holy See, Canada, Japan, China, Singapore, Italy and the Nordic countries of Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Iceland); White House Halloween, Let’s Read! Let’s Move! one-of-a-kind reading and physical activity events for children hosted at the U.S. Supreme Court, the National Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Library (where only Queen Elizabeth has held an event before), the National Archives and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts; FLOTUS film screenings, workshops and garden events; national bus tours for the Secretary, media and campaign launches, etc.

Very successful at recruiting top talent and entertainment, Juliette’s events and related projects have featured ABC’s Chef Carla Hall, CSI’s Hill Harper, HGTV’s The Property Brothers Drew and Jonathan Scott, Star Trek’s LaVar Burton, Morgan Freeman, Tony award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad, U.S. Olympian Michelle Kwan, NBA’s Jeremy Lin and Kareem Abdul Jabbar, the NFL’s Brian Mitchell, John Fina and LeVar Arrington, Wimbleton’s Leander Paes and Martina Hingis, personal trainer to the former First Family Cornell McClellan and a variety of other celebrities and public figures.

Prior to this, Juliette served as Director of Conference Services and Agency-wide Outreach for the Department of Education, promoting the national education agenda through 60 trade shows and exhibits a year and coordinating internal agency-wide outreach across 21 principal offices and 10 regions.

As part of an executive leadership program, Juliette also worked with the National Transportation Safety Board in D.C., where she advised on internal and external communication strategies for the agency, its Chairman and appointed Board members, as well as its modal offices, under the direction of the managing director. Juliette was made aware that her recommendations were incorporated into an overall reorganization plan by the managing director and later implemented in part by new leadership.

Juliette found her courage, shared her vision and began her career at the Department of Education as the Director of Communications and Media Support Services for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), under the world-renowned disability advocate and then Assistant Secretary Judith E. Heumann. Juliette also provided communications support to the Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration and the directors of the Office of Special Education Programs and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. In addition to media relations, Juliette directed both internal and external communications, as well as national events, including milestone celebrations for the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

Involved in the establishment and promotion of a partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, its 3,000 chambers, three million member businesses and its Center for Workforce Preparation to increase the employment of people with disabilities, Juliette led a creative team of designers, copywriters and editors from the Department and the Chamber to develop the guidebook “Disability Employment 101. “

As an advocate for inclusive health and wellness, Juliette was called upon by former U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona to host “Disability is Not Inability,” the nationwide video release of the Surgeon General’s first “Call to Action to Improve the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities.” In 2015, Juliette also was called upon by former U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to launch another national Call to Action focusing on Walkable, and thanks to Juliette, Rollable Communities. Most recently, Juliette was invited by the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability to speak about health equity and support the Inclusive Health Bill of Rights at the National Press Club for the Inclusive Fitness Coalition: Celebrating 10 Years Event.

Known for her story-making abilities as a journalist, Juliette also pitched to the Maryland-based Discovery Health channel that people with disabilities have the same fitness and wellness needs as everyone else, a message often overlooked by the mainstream media and in local, state and national health and fitness arenas. Experiencing weight loss challenges personally due to limited mobility, secondary conditions and inaccessible workout facilities, Juliette advocated for producers to profile someone with a disability in the channel’s fitness programming. Receiving a surprise telephone call from Film Garden Entertainment in Hollywood, Juliette became the first person with multiple, severe disabilities to appear on the mainstream, health and fitness “National Body Challenge” series and related news break commercials advocating fitness for “every body.” Reaching millions, Juliette’s message about embracing a healthier lifestyle is still featured in their programming today. As a result, Juliette earned a Presidential Active Lifestyles Award from the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition and appeared on The Learning Channel and PBS in “Education News Parents Can Use: Keeping Kids Healthy, Physically Fit and Learning throughout the Year.” Juliette also has been featured on television working out with her trainer in a boxing gym.

Refusing to accept the barriers many women with disabilities face to receiving adequate healthcare, Juliette also advocated to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office on Women’s Health to ensure the needs of women with disabilities are integrated into nationwide women’s health information dissemination and national awareness campaigns. As a result, Juliette was selected by HHS to appear on the CBS Early Show as the first woman with a disability to serve as the national spokeswoman for National Women’s Health Week and National Women’s Check-Up Day, advocating to millions for preventative health screenings for all women and breaking down firsthand the myth that disability equates to sickness.

Before coming to D.C., Juliette was recruited by Pierce, Deditius & Galyean (PD&G) Advertising, the once leading healthcare advertising agency in the Southwest, to direct public relations for the agency’s national and international client base, including Johnson & Johnson Medical, Columbia Children’s Hospitals and Slugger Orthopedics. Her work was recognized with a “Best of Texas” award from the Texas Public Relations Association and an International RX Award.

Prior to this, she served as Director of Disability Support Services for Texas Woman’s University, managing a caseload of over 200 students with disabilities and expanding academic service provision and curriculum access across the University’s four campuses. In between advising and mentoring students, consulting with staff about reasonable accommodations, and chairing the University’s ADA committee, Juliette increased visibility of available services through an expanded community outreach program and an award-winning promotional campaign.

Recognized for her numerous achievements, Juliette was selected as Ms. Wheelchair Maryland 2004, Ms. Wheelchair America 2005, and has been featured in publications and on radio and television around the world, including Woman’s World Magazine, Life Magazine on-line, Time Magazine, The Today Show, the CBS Early Show, the Discovery Health Channel, National Public Radio, the Maurice Boland Show (Spain), Arthritis Today, Exceptional Parent, Careers & the Disabled, Vegetarian Times, New Mobility, The Washington Post Magazine, etc.

Juliette is an active volunteer and citizen advocate who believes participation is more than having a physical presence in the community. She says it’s about finding identity through involvement in and contribution to community life. Juliette is a “Heroine of Washington,” honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the March of Dimes for her dedication to community service. She also is recognized as a Drum Major for Service by the White House and the Corporation for National and Community Service with the President’s Volunteer Service Award, for “her extraordinary work and service within the education sector and the broader community….where she continues to devote numerous hours to serving individuals living with disabilities to help them live their best life.”

She received the Governor’s Citation by Governor Martin O’Malley for her work on behalf of people with disabilities in the state of Maryland, and the League of People with Disabilities honored Juliette as Advocate of the Year. She also holds the key to the city of Columbia, South Carolina presented to her by former Mayor Bob Coble. She was recognized by Washington Women in Public Relations (WWPR) as one of three extraordinary public relations practitioners in Washington, D.C. and also was recognized by Tau Kappa Alpha National Honor Society in Journalism.

Juliette has applied her award-winning public relations background to raise awareness of arthritis and its impact on 46 million Americans, having served in a volunteer capacity as National Public Relations Chair for the Arthritis Walk, an $11 million property involving nearly 350 events in 40 markets with more than 80,000 walkers.

Juliette serves as a committed member of the award-winning board of directors of Easter Seals Greater Washington-Baltimore Region. As a lead spokesperson, she has attracted, engaged and influenced partners, investors, leading philanthropists and prospective board members with capacity to realize the mission and future vision of Easter Seals, resulting in funds raised, people served, lives improved and stronger communities. She also helped communicate the vision for and actively supported the $18 million capital campaign for the groundbreaking and launch of Easter Seals 42,000-square-foot Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Inter-Generational Center, an international model of service delivery custom-built to provide services for over 1,500 children and adults with special needs.

Juliette is listed with Damon Brooks Associates, the leading nationwide speakers bureau representing people with disabilities, and appears regularly before audiences from 10 people to 20,000, across the United States speaking on topics ranging from the employment of people with disabilities to accessible transportation, public relations/communications, image building, diversity, health and wellness, etc. She moderated the private release of the Sundance docu-series PUSH Girls and the private screening by Fox Searchlight of the movie “Sessions,” starring Helen Hunt and John Hawke. Juliette recently addressed American Airlines crew chiefs at Reagan National Airport and previously served as an enrichment speaker and ambassador for Celebrity Cruise Lines under Royal Caribbean International, where she also provided disability awareness training to front-line dining and stateroom cruise staff. She currently serves on the Royal Caribbean Guest Advisory Board on Disabilities.

Identified as one of 21 international thought leaders on leadership (including Former President Bill Clinton), Juliette was invited by HR.com to speak at the “Oscars of Human Resources” Leadership Excellence and Development (LEAD) conference in Dallas, TX. She also delivers keynote addresses and diversity workshops across the federal government, focusing on the employment of people with disabilities. Previous addresses include the Office of Management and Budget in the Executive Office of the President, the Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USDA), the U.S. Department of Treasury, U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol and FEMA), U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Education, as well as the Social Security Administration, General Services Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture, NASA and the National Institutes of Health. She also keynoted the Perspectives on the Employment of Persons with Disabilities Conference sponsored by the U.S. Census Bureau, the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, NOAA, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, U.S. Department of Labor, USDA and the DOD.

Juliette holds a Master of Journalism degree, focusing on public relations with a unique minor in rehabilitation studies, from the University of North Texas and a Bachelor of Science degree in journalism from Texas A&M University. Juliette also is a graduate of Partners in Policymaking, a national leadership training program to promote independent living and to teach self-advocates with disabilities to influence public policy. Residing in North Bethesda, MD, she served three governor-appointed terms on the Maryland Commission on Disabilities and was appointed by the governor to the Maryland Statewide Independent Living Council.

As a freelance journalist, Juliette has been published in Allied Healthweek, Nurseweek and Advance magazines.

Amidst the stories of great disability leaders, Juliette’s passionate message can be found in the compilation “Enabled in Words: The Real Lives, Real Victories of People with Disabilities.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsville- Walking our Way to a Fit Future

This is part of the panel, The View from City Hall: Opportunities and Challenges for Small Towns 

The goal of our presentation is to showcase our small towns Natural Resources <Riverview Beach Park, Delaware River access, and Fort Mott State Park> and share the towns vision and commitment to a Healthier Community.  We have a long-term plan to tie into current walk ways, both in New Jersey, and the state of Delaware by connecting a 3.5 mile stretch of unpaved/ unused land on the water way in Pennsville.  In our long-term vision we would like to build a dock and have Ferry service to Delaware, which would allow us access to an 18 mile trail, making our total trail between both States over 25 miles long.

Presenter: Billy Biebel, Township Committeeman, Pennsville Township

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Kristin Beckmann, Deputy Mayor, City of St. Paul

Kristin Beckmann became Deputy Mayor of Saint Paul in May of 2014. Before joining the Coleman Administration, Kristin was the Vice President of Programs & Services at Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity for five years. At Habitat she managed the organization’s housing stabilization programs for low income families while overseeing community and government relations. As an affordable housing developer, Kristin gained great knowledge of Saint Paul – its community groups and the city government as they worked to revitalize neighborhoods hard hit by foreclosure and build homes where people can afford to live.

Kristin took two short-term leaves from Habitat – one to work on Governor-Elect Dayton’s Transition team in 2010 and the other to work on Mayor-Elect Hodges’s Transition team in 2013. In this capacity, Kristin assisted both the newly elected Minnesota Governor and the Mayor of Minneapolis to identify key leaders for their administrations.

Prior to working at Habitat, Kristin was the Executive Director of Service Employees International Union Minnesota State Council. At SEIU from 2002 to 2008 she ran the political and legislative programs for the union. As the PAC Director she managed large scale voter contact programs. As the head lobbyist, Kristin focused on issues healthcare and immigration reform, nursing home and public education funding, and issues facing low-wage workers.

Kristin attended the Hubert Humphrey School of Public Affairs from 1998-2000 and received her MAPA in nonprofit and public organizational management. After finishing graduate school and before starting at SEIU, Kristin worked for a year each at the Minnesota Department of Health and the Office of the State Auditor on similar efforts around government and community relations.

Prior to graduate school, Kristin was a political fundraiser and worked as campaign staff or consultant from 1992-1998 for candidates including Paul Wellstone, Ann Wynia, Ember Reichgott-Junge, Sandy Pappas, Amy Klobuchar, and David Minge. Kristin received her bachelor’s degree with majors in Political Science and Communications from Macalester College in 1992.

In her spare time Kristin serves on the Boards of womenwinning, Minnesota United PAC, Minnesota Housing Partnership and the Family Housing Fund. She lives in Saint Paul with her husband Robert Richman and their two children. She is a member of Mt. Zion congregation.

The National Walking Movement: Perspectives from Federal Policy Leaders (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

Policy leaders at the national and federal level provide important guidance, resources, and information on the growth and development from the walking movement. Hear from those working to promote walking and walkability in US policy on available resources, opportunities to engage, and their thoughts on what to expect.

Room: Governors 1

Moderator: Jill Birnbaum, Vice President of Global Advocacy & Strategic Opportunities, American Heart Association

Panelists (Click on the Links Below to View Presentations):

 

Adonia Lugo

Adonia is an anthropologist who focuses on racial inclusion in active transportation movements. Since receiving her PhD from the University of California, Irvine in 2013, Adonia has organized people of color active transportation advocates and professionals around the country, most recently as part of the The Untokening. In addition to being a partner with Bicicultures, Adonia teaches and advises students on sustainability and social justice at universities in the Los Angeles area. She serves on the advisory boards for Multicultural Communities for Mobility (MCM) and Orange County Environmental Justice (OCEJ). You can learn more about Adonia’s work at her personal website, urbanadonia.com.

Using Mobile Location Based Gaming to Increase Community Engagement

This presentation is part of the “Walking into the Future: Technology and the Walking Movement” panel.

Niantic, Inc. has pioneered the use of mobile location based games to encourage community engagement and outdoor exploration. Knight Foundation is a national foundation with strong local roots that makes significant investments in vibrant public spaces and places that bring people together. Through Niantic’s games, which include Ingress and Pokémon GO, there’s been a rise in gamers who play games outside, leading to increased walking, social interaction, and a number of health benefits. Recognizing shared goals, Knight and Niantic entered into a partnership to work together to explore how their games can get citizens outside, exploring their towns in city-organized events. This presentation will focus in on how we can use outdoor, mobile gaming to encourage communities to come together and create positive experiences in public space, and what we’ve seen so far from our partnership.

Presenter: Yennie Fuller, Civic & Social Impact, Niantic

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Expand Your Toolbox: New and Emerging Resources for Community Change Agents (2:15pm – 3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14 
Like any builder, a community change agent needs the best tools to be able to create livable communities for all members. This session will feature datasets, planning tools, and web-based resources that can help communities better understand and use neighborhood-level data, offer guidance into new research and thinking, and arm advocates with the information needed to make the case for walkable communities across the US.
Room: Kellogg 3
Moderator: Kate Robb, American Public Health Association
Presenters:
  • David Brown, Senior Behavioral Scientist, CDC, Physical Activity and Health Branch
  • Dr. Lawrence D. Frank, PhD, AICP, ASLA, President, Urban Design 4 Health, Inc.
  • Gary A. Jensen, Livability Team Leader, Office of Human Environment HEPH-10, Federal Highway Administration, Download a Copy of the Presentation

Nature’s Role in Community Health and Wellness

This presenter is part of the Livable Communities for All Ages panel.

The benefits of nature are becoming increasingly known in many fields, but how does it touch down in communities? The Children & Nature Network is supporting the implementation of nature-rich strategies across the country through the implementation of policies and programs to amplify equitable access to nature.

Presenter: Sarah Milligan-Toffler, Executive Director, Children & Nature Network

Walking Boot Camp (1:00pm-2:00pm)

Hosted by Physical Activity Partner American Council on Exercise (ACE)

Take your walking workouts up a notch! Come experience a walking boot camp that incorporates fun drills and intensity change into your walk to keep your heart rate elevated while improving strength, balance and flexibility. Participants will walk away with ideas they can incorporate into their walking programs.

Facilitator: Chris Freytag, Founder, GetHealthyU.com

The View from City Hall: Opportunities and Challenges for Small Towns (10:15am-11:45am)

 

Thursday, September 14

Local elected officials can provide valuable support to the creation of vital and vibrant communities of all sizes but small towns are faced with unique challenges and opportunities. Hear from local elected officials of small towns in New Jersey who are working to get their communities on the walking path.

Room: Governors 2

Moderator: Brenda L. Goins, Executive Director, Salem Health & Wellness Foundation

Presenters:

Designing for Inclusive Health (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14 at 2:15pm-3:45pm

This session discusses programs, technology, and design developed specifically to improve mobility and physical activity in people with disabilities. Hear about a 40-week study out of Nova Southeastern University designed to increase physical activity in people with physical and intellectual disabilities, a unique technology to improve pedestrian pathways for all users, and a community in Minnesota who is making a difference with a tactical urbanism strategy to address accessibility barriers for pedestrians.

Room: State 3

Moderator: Juliette Rizzo, National Inclusive Health and Wellness Advocate, Ms. Wheelchair America, and Director of Special Projects, Partnerships and Events in the U.S. Department of Education

Presenters:

From Engagement to Action: Getting Tactical

This presentation is part of the Designing for Inclusive Health panel.

A session discussing the use of Tactical Urbanism as a joint strategy between Duluth’s Commission on Disabilities, the Public Health Department, and a local non-profit organization to address long-standing accessibility barriers for pedestrians in Duluth, MN.

Presenter: Josh Gorham, Public Health Nurse, SHIP Coordinator, St. Louis County Public Health Division

pathVu: Pedestrian Wayfinding for People with Disabilities

This presentation is part of the Designing for Inclusive Health panel.

This presentation will discuss an innovative pedestrian wayfinding tool in development by pathVu.  Typical pedestrian navigation does not focus on accessibility and generally do not take into account features like sidewalk or curb ramp location.  pathVu navigation is built for people with disabilities to ensure a safe and accessible trip.  You will also learn about the different tools, apps, and standards used to collect the important data that goes into this wayfinding.  This is a presentation you won’t want to miss!

Presenter: Eric Sinagra, CEO, pathVu

A Night at the Movies- Citizen Jane: Battle for the City (7:30pm-9:30pm)

Join us for a night at the movies as we screen the film, Citizen Jane: Battle for the City. The film will be followed by a facilitated discussion.

About the Film

In 1960 Jane Jacobs’s book The Death and Life of Great American Cities sent shockwaves through the architecture and planning worlds, with its exploration of the consequences of modern planners’ and architects’ reconfiguration of cities. Jacobs was also an activist, who was involved in many fights in mid-century New York, to stop “master builder” Robert Moses from running roughshod over the city.  This film retraces the battles for the city as personified by Jacobs and Moses, as urbanization moves to the very front of the global agenda. Many of the clues for formulating solutions to the dizzying array of urban issues can be found in Jacobs’s prescient text, and a close second look at her thinking and writing about cities is very much in order. This film sets out to examine the city of today though the lens of one of its greatest champions.

Brian Knudsen

Brian Knudsen is Research Associate at Poverty & Race Research Action Council (PRRAC).  His quantitative data analysis, GIS mapping, and research reports supports PRRAC’s ongoing advocacy work, especially in the areas of housing mobility, AFFH and housing policy.  Brian’s research has been published in venues such as Urban Affairs Review and Annals of the Association of American Geographers.  Brian previously served as a research analyst at the National Association of Counties. He received his B.S. and Ph. D. from Carnegie Mellon University.

Kathy Mouacheupao

Kathy Mouacheupao is the Program Officer for Creative Placemaking with the Twin Cities Local Initiatives Support Corporation (TC LISC), supporting community organizations to develop arts and cultural strategies for community economic development throughout the Twin Cities.  In 2011, she was a Bush Leadership Fellow and researched the Hmong diaspora with a focus on the arts. Before the Fellowship, Kathy was the Executive Director for the Center for Hmong Arts and Talent (CHAT). She has been hosting HmongFM on KFAI Community Radio since 2007 and currently serves on the boards of Hmong Museum and Metropolitan Regional Arts Council (MRAC). She also serves on the Saint Paul Planning Commission.

Soap Lake to Sulphur Springs: Small Towns Improve Walkability

This presentation is part of the Walking and Walkability in Rural Communities panel.

From Eufaula, Alabama, to Soap Lake, Washington… From Canton, Connecticut, to Sulphur Springs, Texas:  Small towns across the United States have demonstrated that walking and active transportation are not just for the big cities. The National Physical Activity Society has twice published single-page features on towns of 25,000 or fewer people. Collecting these 15 stories, we’ve found common threads. Want to promote walkability in your small town? Glean tips from small town leaders who have learned what they needed to do to succeed.

PresenterPam Eidson, MEd, PAPHS, Executive Director, National Physical Activity Society

Show me the Money! Funding for First/ Last Mile Connections to Transit.

This presentation is part of the Designing and Engineering for Safety and Connectivity session.

This presentation will talk about funding of First and Last Mile Connections (FLMC) to transit study and how to use research and data to advance pedestrian and transit policy. WalkDenver’s Founder Gosia Kung will talk about “Denver Deserves Sidewalks” campaign and how WalkDenver successfully advocated for sidewalk funding in Denver’s city budget. And because every transit rider is a pedestrian and transit is a natural extension of pedestrian trips, the presentation will discuss how walking advocates can represent transit riders.

Presenters: Gosia Kung, Founder and Executive Director, WalkDenver

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Hey, I’m Walking Here!

This presentation is part of the Planning for a Connected, Healthy and Active Future session.

New York City has always been a city of walkers. We walk because of our historic development and transit patterns, because of necessity and many of us walk for pleasure and for health. But New York City’s pedestrians have always had to fight for their space on the street, especially as car ownership became common and street design prioritized vehicular movement. In the last decade, New York City has worked to rebalance the scales and promote active transportation and complete streets. This presentation will include a detailed look at how the Pedestrian Projects Group has improved pedestrian accessibility, safety and health outcomes.

Presenter: Heidi Wolf, Deputy Director,  New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) Pedestrian Projects Group

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

 

Working at the intersection of cycling and social justice

Photo by: Serena Liu

“The bike is second to me. The bike is a tool for social justice,” says Tamika Butler, the executive director of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition who considers safe, accessible, dignified opportunities for active transportation critical to addressing social inequities.

Butler, who took the helm of the organization is 2014, defies many stereotypes of active transportation advocacy, a realm often associated with privileged white men.

“I’m a queer, gender-nonconforming woman of color, and that’s the lens through which I see my work,” Butler recalls telling the board of directors of the bicycle coalition when they (Butler’s preferred pronoun) interviewed for the job. “If I take this job,” Butler advised the future employers, “this is going to be a social justice organization.”

Photo by: Serena Liu

A Stanford-trained lawyer disenchanted by the prospect of a traditional legal career, Butler worked in social justice advocacy before assuming the helm of the bike coalition. The move was precipitated not very long before by a doctor’s warning about the need for more exercise to stem significant weight gain after a move from the Bay Area to the car-dependent City of Angels. On the advice of a friend, Butler bought a bike, a decision that would turn out to be life-changing.

America Walks is thrilled to count Butler among the exciting speakers appearing at the 2017 National Walking Summit in St. Paul September 13-15. Butler’s talk will be one of several sessions to address growing concerns about equity in the active transportation movement.

Read more about Butler’s story here.  

Early bird registration for the conference is open through July 15th. Register now to join Tamika at the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

 

What is a Walking School Bus, and How Can it Enhance My SRTS Program?

This presentation is part of the Walking School Bus session.

Communities across the nation are implementing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs to improve safety conditions and increase the number of students walking to and from school. Starting and sustaining a walking school bus (WSB) can improve student safety, walking accessibility and SRTS program visibility. This session will provide an overview of the value and purpose of a WSB to a SRTS program, key components to begin a program, and resources available to accomplish program implementation and goals.

Presenter: Kate Moening, Field Services Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Meet Featured Speaker Tamika Butler

© Serena Grace Photo

This is an interview with Tamika Butler, executive director of the Los Angeles Bicycle Coalition and featured speaker at the 2017 National Walking Summit.

It seems there has historically been some tension between those working to advocate for pedestrians and those working to advocate for bicyclists. Have you encountered this in your own work and what do you think we can do about it? Why do you think it’s important bicycle advocates also promote walkability and vice versa? 

I came to this advocacy world with very little knowledge about what had been happening in it. Since I’ve been at the bike coalition, I think we’ve tried very hard to talk about walking and biking, even as even internally there’s been some pushback. I’ve really said we have to be more open, we have to bring people in, not exclude people, because we are in this together, and I think it’s important to view things that way. There are definitely times when we have to function as distinct groups (as in when certain infrastructure proposals affect people who walk and bicycle disparately), but I do think we’re stronger together and I’ve been lucky enough to enter the movement (Butler started working at the L.A. Bicycle Coalition in December 2014) at a time when I think people are getting that and getting the intersections.

Few places are more synonymous with the car than L.A.  Less well-known are some of the really important strides being made there in active and public transportation. Can you talk a little about what it’s like working in active transportation advocacy in L.A. in particular? Are there any accomplishments or advances made in recent years about which you’re particularly proud? 

L.A. is a car-centric city and that’s what a lot of people see us as. When you Google pictures of L.A. you see cars on the freeway. But there’s another part of L.A.’s history and present that’s all about walking and biking. It kind of feels like we’re in this special moment where all the forces that we need to are aligning. And as advocates we really have to push because there’s been a lot of plans and now we need to work toward implementation.

Butler points to recent achievements including L.A.’s designation as a Vision Zero city; the hiring of transportation czar Seleta Reynolds, who arrived in L.A. from San Francisco, has a strong record of promoting safe walking and bicycling, and is tasked with implementing a plan aimed at doubling the number of bicyclists and dramatically expanding transportation choice in the city; active transportation allies serving on the L.A. City Council; and the passage of Measure M, a transportation sales tax approved by voters in 2016 that will for the first time set aside dedicated funding for active transportation. Butler singles out in particular among the projects that stand to benefit from the ballot measure the L.A. River greenway project, a yet-to-be-completed 51-mile multi-use path stretching between L.A. and Long Beach.

Butler likes to tell the story of a longtime bicycle coalition member who several years ago stopped a woman on the street because she was riding a bike, seemed to be approximately the same size as his ex-girlfriend, and, given that she was a bicyclist, thought she might be interested in the bicycle he’d bought for his ex before their breakup. She was, and the two strangers ignored any apprehensions that might normally occur to two people finding themselves in this situation and headed to his house to check out the bike. “There were so few people you would see out biking that when you saw another person out biking you were like, ‘You’re ok.’ Butler explained. Today, the sense of instant friendship with anyone else on a bike has eroded a bit thanks to the growth in L.A.’s cycling ranks. “It’s been a really big cultural shift here and we’re really excited about it.”

You have a law degree and a background in working to advance social justice. How did you find your way to active transportation advocacy? 

I’ve always seen myself as a social justice advocate. I didn’t love being a lawyer, and I actually left law to work at a public health organization, and after that I worked at a foundation that helps boys and men of color. Biking was something I got into after I moved into L.A. in 2012 or 2011 (from the Bay Area). A doctor told me I had gained a lot of weight, probably from spending so much more time than I was used to in my car, and I needed to get active. I had a friend who biked and she convinced me to buy one of my own and shortly after that, I started riding with her. Up until this time, I hated the city of L.A., largely because of how much time I was spending stuck in my car, but the second I got on a bike, I could actually slow down and see how amazing many of the communities are here…I could be in the mountains, I could be at the beach, and I could do all that in one day, powered by myself. And as a result, I really started of fall in love with the city. As it turns out, the same friend who convinced me to buy a bike was the same friend who introduced me to my girlfriend who is now my wife. That friend was also a member of the bike coalition, and when they announced they were looking for an executive director, she sent me the announcement and encouraged me to apply for the job.

© Serena Grace Photo

How does your social equity lens continue to influence your current work? 

When I applied for the job, I said to the board, ‘I’m a queer, gender nonconforming woman of color, and that’s the lens through which I see my work and if I take this job, this is going to be a social justice organization.’ I think for me, as a person who lives at the intersections, it’s impossible not to see the intersections in the work. I think the intersections were always here and I love that they’re here and I’ve just been really able to highlight them and talk about them more. There have been people in the transportation world doing this for a really, really long time and I’m just following in their footsteps.

In terms of how this translates to coalition policy and initiatives, Butler describes making a concerted effort to “push boundaries” and to place the needs of low-income people and people of color at the forefront of the coalition’s work.

The bike is second to me. The bike is a tool for social justice.

What is one thing you’re looking forward to doing, seeing, or exploring in St. Paul? 

I’m originally from Omaha, Nebraska so I’m a Midwest kid. I’ve been (to the Twin Cities) a few times with family and know a lot about the area, but never really been on my own as a full-fledged adult, so that’s exciting. We just had a big park equity summit here put on by an organization called the L.A. Neighborhood Land Trust that was awesome, awesome, awesome. We were there as a transportation organization, but to see how folks talked about parks and talked about active transportation and walking and biking and the overlap was really pretty cool. And one of the other things that made it cool was the keynote by Jayne Miller, the superintendent of the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. She gave this awesome talk about how so many people, way more than in L.A., can just walk out of their front door and be within walking distance of a park, so I’m actually really excited to just take a walk in a park when I’m there.

 

 

 

 

Walk, Run or Roll: Innovative Ways to Encourage Active Living

This presenter is part of the Livable Communities for All Ages panel.

AARP is invested in supporting active and healthy living in communities across the country. Whether it is organizing walking clubs, hosting street and sidewalk audits, reimagining a city block or encouraging neighborhood walking tours, AARP is working at the local level to support all generations in living their best lives.

Presenter: Jason Tudor, AICP, Office of Community Engagement, AARP

Stepping Out for Pedestrian Health and Safety

This presentation is part of the Designing and Engineering for Safety and Connectivity session.

In 2016 and 2017, as part of its commitment to helping build safer and more livable communities, ITE has introduced a number of initiatives to improve pedestrian safety and connectivity. This presentation will touch on several of these initiatives, including the ITE Vision Zero Task Force and associated Safety Resources Toolbox, as well as ITE’s Transportation and Health Task Force. The goal of these initiatives is to underscore the importance of a long-term focus on safety and active transportation, and to serve as a principal resource for transportation professionals wanting to ensure a safe and equitable community environment.

Presenter: Steven Lavrenz, Ph.D.; Technical Programs Specialist; Institute of Transportation Engineers

Download a Copy of the Presentation

This is How We Roll

This presentation is part of the Walking and Walkability in Rural Communities panel.

In 2015, the CDC released a report stating that 1 in 5 adults live with a disability or approximately 53 million people (of those, 13% reported a mobility disability).   For people with disabilities, one of the biggest obstacle to participating in our community is the built environment. This is a huge segment of the population that should be present during the planning phases of “inclusive” communities.  This presentation will help identify organizations and strategies for including people with disabilities into all facets of community life.

Presenter: Billy Altom, Executive Director of APRIL, the Association of Programs for Rural Independing Living

CASHS Makes Active Transportation a Reality in Rural Minnesota

This presentation is part of the Walking and Walkability in Rural Communities panel.

Rural communities have a reputation for being auto-centric and New Ulm, MN, is no exception. However, within just two years a cross-sector coalition has changed how the entire community views active transportation while making physical and cultural changes that will be sustained for years to come. This poster documents how New Ulm’s Coalition for Safe, Active, and Healthy Streets (CASHS) came to be and the sustainable impact it has made in the community and share lessons learned along the way.

Presenter: Cindy Winters, Project Manager, Hearts Beat Back: The Heart of New Ulm Project

Measuring the Impact of Complete Streets

This presentation is part of the “From the Ground Up: How the Built Environment Influences Community Health” session.

Learn about the features of a complete street project in the downtown core of a mid-size rural Minnesota community.  Understand the methodology and results of a multi-year study to measure the impact of the complete street design on the local economy, overall safety of the downtown corridor, and business leader perspectives on the project.

Presenters

  • Jessica Peterson, Health Educator, Horizon Public Health
  • Joanne Moze, Senior Program Evaluator, BCBS’s Center for Prevention

Download the Presentation Here

Community Connectivity: Nationally Connected, Locally Invested

This presentation is part of the Designing and Engineering for Safety and Connectivity session.

The Community Connectivity Program transportation program, seeks to improve accommodations for bicyclists and pedestrians in urban, suburban and rural community centers.  These community centers serve as a place where people can meet for social, educational, employment and recreational activities.  The primary goal of the Program is to make conditions safer and more accommodating for pedestrians and cyclists, thereby encouraging more people to use these healthy and environmentally sustainable modes of travel. At the same time, these improvements will make community centers more attractive and livable places to live and work.

Presenters:

  • Jeff Maxtutis, Senior Transportation Manager, AECOM

  • Patrick Zapatka, Community Connectivity Program Manager (Transportation Planner II / SRTS Coordinator), Connecticut Department of Transportation

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Monetizing the Health Related Benefits of Walkability (8:00am-12:00pm)

September 13

Walking has significant benefits for a community, but often the health and economic impacts are overlooked. Making the case to invest in pedestrian infrastructure requires convincing funders and decisions makers of the economic payoffs that will come from a healthier more active population. Economic benefits come from reduced health care costs, increases in workforce productivity, and money spent on the infrastructure itself. Drawing on the work of Dr. Larry Frank and Dr. Nicole Iroz-Elardo at Urban Design 4 Health in quantifying and monetizing health impacts of active transportation, this workshop will discuss foundational economic concepts and illustrate them with recent cases. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and communicate cost-of-illness from the literature to frame the sheer size of chronic disease healthcare expenditures and worker productivity drag in a region;
  • Articulate the options to quantify the public health benefits of land use and transportation investments including both mortality and morbidity;
  • Pair the quantified health benefits with appropriate cost-of-illness methodology to monetize health;
  • Describe how to use the monetized healthcare expenditures and worker productivity gains in input-output modeling to show indirect and induced economic demand from active travel; and
  • Explain how active transportation results in other economic benefits such as real estate values, consumer spending, commuting costs, and tourism.

These topics will be illustrated with several recent projects by Urban Design 4 Health. Participants will learn how a population attributable fraction approach was used in a Portland, Oregon climate scenario planning effort; how the health impacts of physical activity in the Southern California 2016 Regional Transportation Plan were quantified and monetized; and how an input-output model was utilized to provide a flexible planning tool to monetize active travel in Utah.

Located in Kellogg 3

Advocating for Walking and Walkable Communities (8:00am-12:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Become a walking champion with the Advocating for Walking and Walkable Communities training. The training will provide you with the skills, tools, and resources needed to become an effective advocate at the local, state, and federal level. This is a skills-based and intensive training.

This training is being led by the Center for Transportation Excellence and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy.

Located in Kellogg 1

Vision Zero: How Local Communities Are Zeroing in on a New Approach to Safe Mobility for All (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

Cities across the country are taking a new approach to traffic safety: Vision Zero. So, what’s behind the name? How does Vision Zero differ from the traditional approach to traffic safety? And most importantly, is it making a difference in advancing safe mobility for all?

Join leaders from two early-adopter Vision Zero cities – Boston and Los Angeles – and from the national Vision Zero Network to learn more about on-the-ground experiences. This session will also include hands-on participation, as you’ll have the chance to sketch out what your community’s road to zero could look like.

Room: State 1

Presenters

  • Kathleen Ferrier, Policy & Communications Director, Vision Zero
  • Wendy Landman, Executive Director, WalkBoston
  • Emilia Crotty, Policy & Program Manager, Los Angeles Walks

Welcome to St. Paul! Opening Reception (5:00pm-7:00pm)

Help us kick-off the 2017 National Walking Summit with an opening reception highlighting the great city of St. Paul. The reception will feature honored speakers and a poster session showcasing some of the great work of the walking movement.

Featured Speakers:

Featured Posters (Click on the Title of the Poster to View):

Title of PosterPresenter of Poster
Everybody Walks! SD: Walking Program for Remote, Rural SD CommunitiesAnn Schwader, MEd, Extension Nutrition Field Specialist, South Dakota State University Extension
So Unsafe, It Seems Safe: Improving Child Pedestrian Safety Analyses with Latent DemandNick Ferenchak, Transportation Engineer/Planner, PhD Student, McMahon Associates | University of Colorado Denver
Walking the East Harlem Community Walking Trail: How data can support community advocacy for built environment improvementsChristina Nieves, Community Research and Evaluation Specialist, Harlem Neighborhood Health Action Centers, Center for Health Equity, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Refugee Diabetes Prevention Program in Kansas City, KSErick Abernathy, Med, CGW,
Senior Administrator, University of Kansas Health System
NACDD’s Walkability Action Institute -- Making States and Regions More Walkable One Action at A TimeChris Kochtitzky, Senior Advisor, CDC’s Physical Activity and Health Branch
OA Action Alliance: Steps to Walkable EnvironmentsKirsten Ambrose, MS, CCRC, Program Manager, OA Action Alliance, Thurston Arthritis Research Center
Engaging Police to Identify Challenging School Crossings Leigh Ann Von Hagen, PP, AICP,
Senior Research Manager, Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers University
Simple Steps Generates Big Outcomes!Mary Montagne, Health Promotion Supervisor, Dakota County Public Health Department
Beat the Blues Winter Marathon- Outdoor Fun for All Ages!
April Bril, Northeast Iowa Safe Routes to School Coordinator
Upper Explorerland Regional Planning Commission; Ashley Christensen, Northeast Iowa Safe Routes to School Coordinator
Upper Explorerland Regional Planning Commission
Measuring the Urban Walking EnvironmentScott Hess, Active Transportation Planner, Wasatch Front Regional Council
Walking and bicycling excellence by the nation’s most innovative MPOsRochelle Carpenter, Manager of Health and Transportation Programs w/ Transportation for America
Celebrating a National Treasure, One Walk to School at a TimeBeth Barnes, Community Outreach Specialist, North Country Hospital, Newport VT
ON THE MOVE—Partnering for Better HealthSharon Buhr, Chair, ON THE MOVE Partnership, Valley City, ND; Mary Lee Nielson, Marketing Coordinator, Convention & Visitors Bureau, Valley City, ND; Theresa Will, Director, City-County Health District, Valley City, ND; Mary Simonson, Director, Open Door Center, Valley City, ND
Promoting Walking and Health in City Comprehensive PlansLil Leatham, Planner, Dakota County
Become a NorWALKer: Creating a Sustainable Walking Movement in Norwalk, ConnecticutKaitlin Latham, Health Education Associate, Norwalk Health Department
"Q: What Makes WalkWorks Work?
A: Partners + Policy"
Justin Lehman, Public Health Program Administrator, Pennsylvania Department of Health, Bureau of Health Promotion and Risk Reduction; Carol L. Reichbaum, MSL, MSPA, Program Director,
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health
It’s Not Just a Sign #GoHumanSoCalJulia Lippe-Klein, Regional Planner,
Southern California Association of Governments
From Free to Luxury OptionsJohn D Omura, Medical Officer, Physical Activity Epidemiology and Surveillance Team, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Susan A Carlson, Team Lead, Physical Activity Epidemiology and Surveillance Team, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; John Thomas, Policy Director, Office of Sustainable Communities, Environmental Protection Agency; Geoffrey Whitfield, Epidemiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Janet E. Fulton, Branch Chief, Physical Activity and Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
International Sustainable Transportation Exchange Program (I-STEP) – Lessons from RomaniaTony Hull, Nonmotorized Transportation Consultant, Freelance Consultant
Open Streets MinneapolisMatthew Dyrdahl, LCI, AICP, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator, City of Minneapolis
The Case for Healthy Places: Improving Health through PlacemakingLaura Torchio, Project for Public Spaces
The Valley Hi Walk with Friends Story – Community Transformation through a Multi-layered ApproachMarissa Munzing; Program Administrator, Health Education Council
Active Transportation Leadership ProgramWendy Ortiz, Community Engagement Coordinator, California Walks
A Line Bus Rapid Transit - Faster and More Frequent Service for the Twin CitiesMichael Jischke, Senior Associate, Landscape Architecture | Urban Design,
SRF Consulting Group, Inc.
Safer Crossings: Saint Paul’s North End

Holly Moskerintz, Community Programs Outreach Manager, National Association of REALTORS®; Samantha Thomas, Built Environment Manager, Blue Zones; Jeanette Rebar, Community Engagement Coordinator, Public Works, City of Saint Paul; Joe McKinley, Community Engagement Director, Saint Paul Area Association of REALTORS®

 

 

Mayor Christopher B. Coleman

Mayor File ColorChristopher B. Coleman became the Mayor of Saint Paul in 2005 after several years serving on the Saint Paul City Council and doing integral work as a leader within his neighborhood and community. Immediately after taking office, the Mayor set forth on a journey to revitalize the City of Saint Paul, with the ultimate goal of making his hometown the most livable city in America.

The people of Saint Paul have supported Mayor Coleman’s goals and initiatives, reelecting him twice and allowing for ground-breaking projects to unfold, including the creation of the “Green Line,” or the Central Corridor light rail line through downtown Saint Paul and University Avenue, as well as championing a downtown bicycle loop, bringing a brand new Minor League baseball stadium to Lowertown, budgeting over $30 million to improve the city’s roads and infrastructure, and taking a leadership role in advocating for new roads and infrastructure funding options for cities across Minnesota.

Mayor Coleman is also a large proponent of lifting up the people of Saint Paul, focusing on strong police and fire departments to make residents feel safe, and on racial equity and educational programs to close the achievement gap and better prepare the next generation of residents.

Understanding that the future and current success of Saint Paul depends on our ability to equip our students with the tools for success from cradle to career, Mayor Coleman has introduced revolutionary programs such as Sprockets that focuses on how our students spend their crucial time outside of the classroom. Mayor Coleman has assembled the best minds and resources to enrich the lives of children by extending social and academic opportunities beyond the school day, opening new doors of opportunity to a better life and creating a safe environment for them to live and play.

He has also been an advocate for making sustainable living easy and attainable for Saint Paul residents. Just after taking office in 2006, Mayor Coleman signed the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement and has hired sustainability, energy, environment, sustainable transportation and water resources coordinators. The city’s sustainable investments include retrofitting buildings for energy efficiency, equipping public places with solar panels and electric vehicle charging stations, and implementing single-sort recycling.

Having served as both Vice President and President of the National League of Cities, Mayor Coleman has been able to learn about what’s working in cities across the country, and has brought that innovation and revitalization to the City of Saint Paul, allowing his national outlook to truly make Saint Paul the most livable city in America.

Mayor Coleman and his wife Connie live in Saint Paul, where they raised their two children, Molly and Aidan. Mayor Coleman has lived in multiple Saint Paul neighborhoods including Frogtown and Saint Paul’s West Side.

 

Tamika Butler

Photo by: Serena Liu

Photo by: Serena Liu

Tamika is the Executive Director of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Land Trust, a non-profit organization that addresses social and racial equity, and wellness, by building parks and gardens in park-poor communities across Greater Los Angeles. Prior to her role there, Tamika joined the Los Angeles Count Bicycle Coalition staff as the Executive Director in December 2014. Prior to leading LACBC Tamika was the Director of Social Change Strategies at Liberty Hill Foundation, where she oversaw the foundation’s boys and men of color program and the foundation’s LGBTQ grant strategy. Before Liberty Hill, Tamika worked at Young Invincibles as the California Director. As the CA Director, she was responsible for the development of all of Young Invincibles’ programs in California. Tamika was responsible for building out Young Invincibles’ operations on the West Coast and grew the office to the largest regional office outside of their DC headquarters. She transitioned to policy work after litigating for three years as an employment lawyer at Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center.

She received her J.D. in 2009 from Stanford Law School, and in 2006 received her B.A. in Psychology and B.S. in Sociology in her hometown of Omaha, Nebraska. Tamika currently serves on the Boards of Directors of the National Center for Lesbian Rights, Lambda Literary, T.R.U.S.T. South LA, and New Leaders Council – Los Angeles, and is an advisory board member for the Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center’s Fair Play for Girls in Sports program.

Glenn Harris

Glenn Harris_ Head-shot

Glenn Harris is the President of the new Race Forward and Publisher of Colorlines. The new Race Forward is the union of two leading racial justice non-profit organizations: Race Forward and Center for Social Inclusion (CSI), where Glenn served as President starting in 2014. The new Race Forward will build on the work of both organizations to advance racial justice.

Glenn brings to the new Race Forward over 25 years of experience working on issues of race and social justice—working with community groups, foundations, and government agencies dedicated to building a more just and democratic society.

Prior to the new Race Forward and CSI, Glenn worked as the Manager of the City of Seattle Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI), whose mission is to end institutionalized racism in City government and promote multiculturalism and full participation by all residents. Glenn has supported the start of similar initiatives in jurisdictions across the country, and helped to found the Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE).

Glenn came to city government after serving five years as Development Director at Western States Center, an intermediary that provides technical assistance, training, research, and policy analysis in an eight-state region to grassroots organizations working to achieve social change. Glenn also served as the Interim-Director at the MRG Foundation in Portland, Oregon.

 Glenn is currently a board member of the Philanthropic Initiative on Racial Equity (PRE), the Willamette Valley Law Project, and the City Parks Alliance.

A prolific speaker and trainer, Glenn has helped hundreds of organizations across the country center racial equity in their work.

George C. Halvorson

George Halvorson is Chair and CEO of the Institute for InterGroup Understanding. He has served for more than 30 years as CEO of six different health care delivery and financing organizations in the U.S., and he helped start similar health care organizations in several other countries. Halvorson served for more than a decade as Chair and CEO of Kaiser Permanente, beginning that role in 2002.

Halvorson is currently Chair of the First 5 Commission for Children and Families for the State of California. In 2013 Governor Jerry Brown appointed Halvorson to a four-year term as Chair, and then re-appointed him to another four years in 2017. The Commission uses roughly $500 million each year — raised from tobacco taxes — to provide support and education to children in California from birth to 5 years old.

Halvorson is a member of the Right Start Commission for Children in the State of California, and an advisory council member for the Too Small To Fail Commission. He currently serves as a member of the CEO Advisory Council for the Ready Nation coalition.

The Institute for InterGroup Understanding works on issues of racism, prejudice, discrimination, misogyny, and InterGroup stress and conflict. Halvorson has written four books on those topics, which are all available as teaching materials from the Institute.

Electronic versions of the InterGroup books can be downloaded or read directly from the Institute for InterGroup Understanding website at no charge. (Hard copies of the books are available at Amazon.com.)

The books and the Institute website explain how our instinctive behaviors steer us into conflict in various intergroup settings, and outline and explain the steps we should take to create intergroup Peace.

Halvorson recently revised The Art of InterGroup Peace — his book on achieving intergroup peace around the world — into its Third Edition, which can be downloaded for free at the Institute for InterGroup Understanding website.

Three Key Years, one of Halvorson’s most recent titles, is paramount to early childhood education, and explains the importance of positive interactions between caring adults and infants in their first three years of life. Halvorson also designed threekeyyears.org, a website dedicated to educating new parents on the simple steps they should take in a child’s first three years to improve their lives forever.

A Walk in the Park (St. Anthony Park, That Is)* (9:30am-2:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Visit a St. Paul neighborhood that is very walkable and still working to improve. Our walking workshop will start at the Raymond Avenue Green Line LRT Station, include stops at completed and ongoing complete-street improvement projects and finish at our signature Carnegie Library. You will meet neighborhood volunteers and learn how the community formed partnerships to make walkability enhancements possible. Hear about our community surveys, friendly street/bridges block party, walk audits, Drive 25, Stop4Me, ADA and SRTS projects. The St. Anthony Park neighborhood is great example of a collaborative community-wide effort to promote a local walking agenda.

Facilitators:

  • John Mark Lucas, Community Representative, District 12 Community Council-Transportation Committee
  • Suyapa MIranda, Executive Director, St. Anthony Park Community Council

 

Getting it Done with Cross- Sector Collaboration: Lessons and Resources from Voices for Healthy Kids

This presentation is part of the We Are Stronger Together: Creative Coalitions to Promote Walking and Walkability session.

We talk a lot about building “multi-sector coalitions” and engagement of a wide range of traditional and “non-traditional partners”.  We know coalition work is both important and challenging.  Come learn more about our Voices for Healthy Kids power building approach to partner collaboration and how to foster authentic conversations with a diverse set of stakeholders. We will share some of the tools our campaigns and collaborating organizations are using; like our give and get process, organizational profiling, and asset mapping. Participants will leave the Summit with new tools and information needed to forge new partnerships and engage sectors outside of the walking movement to advance policy.

Presenter: Marla Hollander, MPH, National Partnerships Manager, Voices for Healthy Kids, American Heart Association

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

“Muevelo- Latino Community Engagement to Move City Policy

This presentation is part of the We Are Stronger Together: Creative Coalitions to Promote Walking and Walkability session.

Cultiva La Salud engaged Latino residents of Southeast Fresno in informing policy through creative means. Latino residents joined Cumbia Rides and Pasos a la Salud- biking and walking groups to get active in their neighborhoods. These events served as a focal point to build interest and gather community based participatory research that would inform city policy. Culturally relevant engagement of Latino resident and local partnerships were key in the success of the Active Transportation Plan update in the City of Fresno. Join our session and gain insight in lessons learned, outcomes, and how Latino residents led change to local policy.

Presenter: Esther Postiglione, MPH, CHES, Program Manager, Cultiva La Salud

Creative Community Engagement in Denver’s Community Active Living Coalition

This presentation is part of the We Are Stronger Together: Creative Coalitions to Promote Walking and Walkability session.

Denver’s Community Active Living Coalition (CALC) is a unique collaboration between public sector agencies, nonprofit advocacy groups, and community members, focusing on engaging and educating the community in promoting Health in All Policies through active living. During the presentation, we will tell the story of our Coalition and give real-life examples of various types of activities to engage communities in active living work. Some examples of our action-oriented work include: coalition building, city-wide community-driven data collection, interactive community walking tours around health and the built environment, small-scale neighborhood beautification and walkability projects, and multi-modal travel plan policies at elementary schools.

Presenter: Kayla Gilbert, Active Living Program Manager, Denver Environmental Health

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Walk the Talk: A Coalition Laces Up and Steps Out

This presentation is part of the We Are Stronger Together: Creative Coalitions to Promote Walking and Walkability session.

What began as a voluntary meeting of the minds of a diverse group  of stakeholders to address the rising incidence of chronic disease on Long Island has morphed into a dynamic coalition of some 60 plus organizations – from hospitals, health departments, health plans, academic institutions to community-based organizations and businesses.   With walking as a foundation and a unifying activity, learn how this collaborative keeps its feet moving and its focus on improving the health of community members relevant and real.

Presenters:

  • Janine Logan, Senior Director, Communications and Population Health, Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council/Long Island Health Collaborative
  • Kim Whitehead, Communications Coordinator, Long Island Population Health Improvement Program/Long Island Health Collaborative

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

We Are Stronger Together: Creative Coalitions to Promote Walking and Walkability (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

At the 2015 National Walking Summit, keynote speaker Ron Sims reminded us all that we are “stronger together.” This session will explore coalitions and partnerships from across the US that are working to promote walking and walkable communities.

Room: Kellogg 1

Moderator: Joan Dorn, PhD, Co-Chair, Every Body Walk! Collaborative

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

SWAP School Walkability Action Project

This presentation is part of the It Takes a Village: Vital Elements of a Healthy Community session.

Loma Linda University Community Health Development, school nurses, and Department of Pediatrics created a network of two walking loops per elementary school San Bernardino County.  The objective was to provide an option of thirty minutes of physical activity from the doorstep of each school. The Center for Disease Control Walkability Toolkit was adapted and two walking loops were mapped and scored.  In addition Wellness elements were GIS mapped surrounding each school, e.g. medical/dental clinics, fresh foods, markets, pharmacies, parks.

Presenter: Marti Baum, MD, Loma Linda University Health Community Health Development, Medical Director Outreach to “K”ommunity Kids, Director Department of Pediatrics Social Action Community Health System, FQHC

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Harlem Health Advocacy Partners Resident-Led Walking Groups for Health!

This presentation is part of the It Takes a Village: Vital Elements of a Healthy Community session.

The New York City Health Department’s HHAP program has created enduring and sustainable walking groups for public housing residents of East and Central Harlem. The session will provide a program overview that describes the current health inequities in the neighborhood, the formation of the walking groups and strategies used to transform program-led groups to resident-owned, socially engaging walking groups and success stories from participants. Best practices and lessons learned will be shared to inspire other placed-based initiatives to (1) motivate participants to view walking as an inexpensive way to stay active (2) realize the benefits of participants socializing and (3) create ownership for long-term sustainability.

Presenter: Sindia Avila, Community Health Worker, Harlem Health Advocacy Partners; a program from East Harlem Neighborhood Health Action Center, Center for Health Equity, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Walkability and Healthy Food Access: Planning Through an Equity Lens

This presentation is part of the It Takes a Village: Vital Elements of a Healthy Community session.

Our food system plays a critical role in the health of our communities, yet we know there are significant disparities we need to address. Thoughtful walkability planning can make real improvements. In this session, we’ll look at how planning for a walkability can facilitate equity, sustainable food systems, and healthy communities. We’ll share several resources, including the Food Access Planning Guide and Minnesota Walks, a collaborative effort between the Minnesota Departments of Transportation and Health for safe, desirable, and convenient places to walk and roll.  Participants will leave with strategies, resources, and sample language for walkability planning projects.

Presenter: Nadja Berneche, Healthy Comprehensive Planning Director, Terra Soma

Download a Copy of the Presentation

It Takes a Village: Vital Elements of a Healthy Community (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

Walkable communities are not just made up of good sidewalks and safe crosswalks. Explore how different sectors and industries can inform and influence the physical, mental, and social health of a community.

Room: Governors 3

Moderator

Bronwen Thornton, Development Director, Walk21

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Safe Routes to Parks: Engaging Your Community

This presentation is part of the Exploring the Great Outdoors session.

Engagement is the cornerstone of a successful Safe Routes to Parks initiative. In this session you will learn about when and how to incorporate community members and community partners into each phase of the Safe Routes to Parks Action Framework. This will be demonstrated through select stories from the 10 pilot communities. The pilot projects range from increasing safe pedestrian connections from main streets to parks in rural and suburban communities to overcoming real and perceived crime in urban communities so that parks can be safe public spaces for people to be active and gather together.

Presenter: Rachel Banner, Program Manager, National Recreation and Park Association

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Walking, Nature, and Therapy: Getting Up Off the Freudian Couch, and Onto Nature’s Path of Healing

This presentation is part of the Exploring the Great Outdoors session.

This session will focus on the benefits of the three combined components, walking, therapy, and nature. This presentation will aim to engage public health professionals and discuss the advantages of walking from a mental health perspective. One out of 5 adults experience mental illness in a given year.  Walking therapy sessions, lead to a decrease in symptoms of anxiety, depression, and attentional issues all while providing the impetus for lifestyle changes.  The session will explain best practices for engaging in walking therapy. The presentation will be peppered with case vignettes, and real clinical moments, with room for Q&A

Presenter: Jen Udler, LCSW-C, Clinical Social Worker, Walking Therapy

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Walking the East Harlem Community Walking Trail: A Mechanism to advocate for Improvements to the Streetscape and Social Cohesion

This presentation is part of the Exploring the Great Outdoors session.

The East Harlem Community Walking Trail is a 3.5 mile pathway on East Harlem sidewalks that runs east and west along 106th and 115th Streets in East Harlem.  Grounded in collaborative efforts and led by a steering committee composed of residents, community-based organizations, and city agencies, the walking trail has created a forum to share neighborhood stories and perspectives about walking in the neighborhood. The project has provided opportunities to advocate for improvements to the streetscape and implement creative wayfinding and programming that contributes to the vitality and vibrancy of East Harlem.

Presenter: Cinthia De La Rosa, Project Coordinator, Harlem Neighborhood Health Action Centers, Center for Health Equity, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Exploring the Great Outdoors (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

The outdoors offers beautiful places to walk and be physically active. This session will explore how communities can engage with parks, trails, and other outdoor spaces to encourage walking and other forms of physical activity.

Room: Kellogg 2

Moderator: Matt Norris, Senior Associate-Content, Urban Land Institute

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Predictable is Preventable: Tracking Pedestrian Near-miss Incidents

This presentation is part of the Law Enforcement: Partners in Safety and Engagement session.

Crash data is often is the only factor used to identify places where pedestrian safety improvements are needed. However, crash data alone does not sufficiently identify hazardous locations. Pedestrian injury prevention must be pro-active in identifying challenging crossings rather than reactive to injury or death due to a crash. Researchers at Rutgers University surveyed police for information on school crossings considered most challenging for pedestrians. Officers identified “pedestrian near-misses with vehicles” more frequently than pedestrian crashes with vehicles. This presentation will identify ways to be pro-active in identifying problem areas and how to leverage local expertise to prioritize unsafe crossings.

Presenter: Leigh Ann Von Hagen, PP, AICP, Senior Research Manager, Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers University

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Stop For Me!

This presentation is part of the Law Enforcement: Partners in Safety and Engagement session.

The City of St. Paul is making sure cars Stop For Me!  As part of a collaborative effort between the community, advocate and community organizations, all City departments, Ramsey County, and MN DOT, we are trying to change driver behavior and make it safer for the most vulnerable users of roads and transit systems.  We are implementing all the E’s and making a difference in St. Paul.  Come learn how you can bring this successful program to your community!

Presenters

  • Sgt. Kat Brown, St. Paul Police Department
  • John Mark Lucas, Community Representative, District 12 Community Council-Transportation Committee

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Making Change: Creating a Campaign without Breaking the Bank

This presentation is part of the Law Enforcement: Partners in Safety and Engagement session.

Making change in your community can be expensive and cumbersome. Infrastructure, legal issues, policy issues, and multiple stakeholders can all derail well-intentioned efforts. This session will give you simple but effective strategies to create a campaign that cuts through these issues allowing you to reach your audience with a productive message. Attendees will learn simple, cost effective strategies that can be used alongside more complex changes in their community, how to leverage social media to launch a campaign, and how different media can be used to spread a message to a diverse population.

Presenter: Eric Snyder, Community Resource Officer, Ames Police Department

Police as Pedestrian Advocates

This presentation is part of the Law Enforcement: Partners in Safety and Engagement session.

In partnership with MassDOT and the Boston Police Academy, WalkBoston produced a video for law enforcement that summarized Massachusetts’ traffic laws related to pedestrian safety. The video not only met the goal of informing police officers of relevant statutes, but it also: 1.Demonstrated the complexities of laws that apply to pedestrians and other road users.  2.Elevated status of enforcing laws that protect pedestrians.  3.Provided information on impact of road design on pedestrian safety.

The video is now part of the police continuing education program statewide and has been used by many outside of law enforcement.

Presenter: Stacey Beuttel, Program Director, WalkBoston

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Law Enforcement: Partners in Safety and Engagement (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Safe streets are not just streets that are safe from traffic fatalities and crashes. In order for a community to be walkable, all community members must feel safe and encouraged to be physically active throughout the neighborhood. Law enforcement can be critical partners in creating and promoting safe communities.

Room: State 1

Moderator: Rosemary Agostini, Founder and Past Chief Activity, Sports and Exercise Medicine

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Stepping up to a Regional Sidewalk Data Inventory

This presentation is part of the “From the Ground Up: How the Built Environment Influences Community Health” session.

This presentation will outline the process of collecting, analyzing and applying sidewalk data collected throughout small communities in the seven county Arrowhead Region of Northeast Minnesota.  ARDC has gathered sidewalk condition data from 26 cities totaling over 204 miles throughout the Region. The goal of the project is to organize and display sidewalk data in a user-friendly format to influence local decisions.  The presentation will give an overview of how sidewalk database was developed, educate attendees about best practices when developing a sidewalk inventory, and showcase how sidewalk data and new technology can be used to enhance planning processes.

Presenters

  • Charlie Moore, Senior GIS Specialist, ARDC
  • Justin Otsea, Senior Planner, ARDC

Walking the Walk: Active Design and WELL Standards for the Built Environment

This presentation is part of the “From the Ground Up: How the Built Environment Influences Community Health” session.

Our presentation will introduce the WELL Building Standard (WELL) and the novel built environment rating system being developed for communities. It will also discuss the ways in which the built environment can be designed and operated to promote physical activity across the lifespan at the community scale as well as barriers to implementing interventions at this scale.

Presenter

  • Vienna McLeod, Associate, Standard Development, International WELL Building Institute

Download the Presentation Here

Walkability in Small Rural Towns: Assessing the Built Environment

This presentation is part of the “From the Ground Up: How the Built Environment Influences Community Health” session.

Lifestyle related chronic diseases affect almost half of U.S. adults, especially in rural areas. Research associating environmental aspects with increased PA in urban areas is lacking for small towns. A research framework is being developed to better understand environmental determinants of active travel in small towns including a new assessment tool based on a literature review, walkability audits, GIS spatial analysis and photomapping. Data on walking and perception of walkability will be collected in two small towns through questionnaires, resident discussion workshops, and interviews. Follow-up testing of the instrument includes a health promotion plan for each town.

Presenter: Kristin Thorleifsdottir, Ph.D. MLA, assistant professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

From the Ground Up: How the Built Environment Influences Community Health (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

Where we live determines how we live. This session explores how different elements of the built environment can inform and influence the physical, mental, and social health of community members.

Room: Governors 3

Moderator

Emiko Atherton, Director, National Complete Streets Coalition

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Walking Safely in a Sprawling Community: Dallas-Fort Worth MPO pedestrian strategies

This presentation is part of the Designing and Engineering for Safety and Connectivity session.

This session will focus on a regional approach to education, funding, training, and data strategies to assist in pedestrian safety planning and implementation in a region of 7million people within the urban, suburban, and rural context.

It will highlight innovative GIS tools used for: data collection for user counts, mapping of last mile connections to transit, for identifying “hot spots” for pedestrian safety concerns, and for short car trip options to prioritize investment. Innovative funding used for projects and a regional safety campaign will be discussed as well as partnership opportunities and context sensitive design priorities.

Presenter: Karla Weaver, AICP, Program Manager, North Central Texas Council of Governments

Improving Street Crossings in Minneapolis

This presentation is part of the Designing and Engineering for Safety and Connectivity session.

Minneapolis has a strong commitment to providing safe and convenient infrastructure for people that walk. Over the past few years, Minneapolis has explored several small scale, temporary, and demonstration projects to test street crossing improvements, particularly at unsignalized intersections. The City is now in the process of creating a capital Pedestrian Street Crossing Program. The focus of the program will be hardscape elements of street crossings, including but not limited to, pedestrian bumpouts, center medians, and intersection realignments. Other important features include high visibility durable crosswalk markings, ADA accessible curb ramps, Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS), and active warning beacons.

Presenter: Matthew Dyrdahl, AICP, LCI, Minneapolis Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Designing and Engineering for Safety and Connectivity (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

How do we create communities where all people have access to safe, adequate transportation, affordable housing, enjoyable play opportunities and the infrastructure to support them? This session will look at different ways the built environment and planning can promote communities where all members have safe, accessible, and enjoyable places to walk and be physically active.

Room: Governors 2

Moderator

Toks Omishakin, Deputy Commissioner/Chief Environment and Planning, Tennesssee Department of Transpoprtation

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

How Walkable is Your Highway?

This presentation is part of the Planning for a Connected, Healthy and Active Future session.

Urban highways are a massive impediment to walkability.  This presentation will highlight how highways impede walkability and ways to mitigate those impacts, using examples from cities around the world. We will look closely at how highways prioritize long distance trips, creating barriers that prevent equitable access.  This will include a detailed look at the Reconnect Austin campaign and how the rebuild of I-35 in Austin could be designed to improve walkability, creating a healthier Austin in a number of critical ways. We will wrap up with an overview of the state/federal process, common pitfalls, and resources for advocates.

Presenters

  • Heyden Black Walker, Urban Planner, Reconnect Austin
  • Lauren Cresswell, Policy Advisor, Reconnect Austin

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Planning for Health: Using Health, Safety and Equity Data to Prioritize Public Investments

This presentation is part of the Planning for a Connected, Healthy and Active Future session.

This session will highlight the intersection of planning and public health, showcasing the development of Indianapolis’ first Pedestrian Master Plan, funded through the American Planning Association Plan4Health initiative. The plan established a long-term vision for a more walkable and healthy Indianapolis and clear, equitable, data-driven priorities to guide infrastructure investments. This session will share an overview of plan development, the data and methodology employed in determining the prioritization framework and highlight other recommendations. Multidisciplinary and interagency collaboration, as well as the innovative ways in which key stakeholders and the general public were engaged in the process, will be discussed.

Presenter: Kate Riordan, Active Living Program Manager, Health by Design

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

The Semi-Complete Story of Complete Streets Implementation in Saint Paul

This presentation is part of the Planning for a Connected, Healthy and Active Future session.

This presentation focuses on the implementation of a complete streets policy in the City of Saint Paul, including developing a street design manual and complete streets action plan. The Saint Paul Street Design Manual includes best design practices for all modes, but focuses on pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. The Complete Streets Action Plan outlines the next 10 steps the City should undertake to further implement complete streets policies. Innovative outreach techniques used to develop these documents will also be presented, including workshops and a “Better Block” event.

Presenter: Reuben Collins, Civil Engineer III, City of St. Paul Department of Public Works

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Roanoke Valley Walks: A Pedestrian Plan for the Future

This presentation is part of the Planning for a Connected, Healthy and Active Future session.

The Roanoke Valley’s 2015 Regional Pedestrian Vision Plan provides a framework for developing land, redefining existing activity centers, and building infrastructure to promote walking for everyday trips.  The Plan incorporates public/stakeholder input and local plan recommendations, evaluates subdivision/zoning codes, provides examples of land development and infrastructure supportive of walkable places, and affirms that land development practices play the biggest role in the attractiveness of an area for pedestrian transportation.  Having already spurred new infrastructure projects, performance measures, and additional studies, the Plan is a great reference for the Roanoke Valley and other communities.

Presenter: Cristina D. Finch, AICP LEED AP, Director of Transportation, Roanoke-Valley Alleghany Regional Commission

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Planning for a Connected, Healthy and Active Future (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

Vital and vibrant communities require participation and cooperation from government officials, businesses and organizations to promote walking and walkability efforts in their communities. This session will explore how communities from across the US are putting in place plans and policies that help promote safe, healthy and active neighborhoods.

Room: Governors 4

Moderator: Sonia Jimenez, America Walks Board

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Friendly Front Yards: a Powerful Tool to Create Community and Walkability One Front Yard at a Time

This presentation is part of the Off the Walking Path: Creative Walkable Interventions session.

In an era when the social fabric of our communities is fraying before our eyes, there has never been a more important time for us all to engage in the exact place where we live. In response, The Musicant Group has developed the Friendly Front Yard process and toolkit, which provides a step-by-step process for people to transform the most common underutilized space in America into places that make people and their communities feel alive. With users of this process meeting on average 5.4 new neighbors each, learn how you can deploy this powerful tool in your own yard and community.

Presenters

  • Max Musicant, Founder and CEO, The Musicant Group
  • Katherine O’Neil, Project Manager, The Musicant Group

Download a Copy of the Presentation

The Political Power of Walking Art

This presentation is part of the Off the Walking Path: Creative Walkable Interventions session.

Walking art, or walking as an artistic practice or medium, may be one way to stay alert to the politics and possibilities within the places we live, work, and walk. This presentation spotlights several walking art projects and addresses how these projects provide pedestrians new understandings of the spaces they inhabit. Whether it’s tracing gentrified LGBTQ histories in New York’s West Village, or exploring neighborhoods hidden by highways in Houston, walking art endows its participants with greater political agency that they can carry into their daily lives — one step at a time.

Presenter: Elena Lindstrom, Macalester College ’17

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Open Streets: Celebrating Communities and Increasing Walkability

This presentation is part of the Off the Walking Path: Creative Walkable Interventions session.

This presentation will highlight Oregon Walkways, a new pedestrian-focused Open Streets event series created by Oregon Walks, the state’s pedestrian advocacy organization.

Presenters will share what inspired their vision, how they went about executing it, their experience working in partnership with community organizations and neighborhood residents and the changes they hope to see in these communities as a result. This presentation aims to share successes and challenges, and works in progress of making Open Streets reflect the diverse communities from which they arise.

Presenter: Inna Levin, Volunteer & Outreach Coordinator, Oregon Walks

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Bus Stop Moves: Exercise While You Wait!

This presentation is part of the Off the Walking Path: Creative Walkable Interventions session.

Do you wish it was easier to fit fitness into your daily routine? Of course! We all do, and now you can.

Bus Stop Moves’ mission is to increase opportunities to move healthy and change perceptions about the “right” place to exercise by wrapping health tips and exercise illustrations on public bus shelters in Cleveland, Ohio. Collaborators include Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority and The MetroHealth System with support from ioby, The Kresge Foundation and numerous community partners.

Whether you have five or twenty minutes until the bus arrives, make a positive impact on your health by busting a move!

Presenter: Allison Lukacsy-Love, AIA, Architect, Community Projects Manager, City of Euclid

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Off the Walking Path: Creative Walkable Interventions (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Creative, out-of-the-box thinking can inspire people and communities to act and become walkable. The presenters in this session represent just some of the creativity that can encourage attendees to develop their own innovative ways to create walkable communities. 

Room: Governors 4

Moderator: Mukul Malhotra, Principal, MIG

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

GET HEALTHY, GET GREEN, GET ACTIVE4.ME

This presentation is part of the Walking into the Future: Technology and the Walking Movement session.

Many suburban schools implement successful Safe Routes to School programs, but mimicking these practices in larger urban districts is far more challenging when coping with a wide range of safety, social economic and health equity issues.  We will look at the successes and challenges of several urban schools that have utilized Active4.Me a web based program that uses bar code technology. Active4.Me not only promotes active transportation, but also tracks participation and other metrics (miles walked, calories burned, C02 removed etc…) and has a parent alert option that notifies them their child has safely arrived to school.

Presenter: Jenny Hansen, Toledo Safe Routes to School Coordinator, YMCA/Live Well Greater Toledo

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Using Citizen Science to Identify Barriers and Facilitators to Walking and Walkability in African-American Communities in the US

This presentation is part of the Walking into the Future: Technology and the Walking Movement session.

GirlTrek brokered national training partnerships with Stanford Prevention Research Center and Safe Routes to School National Partnership to provide advocacy and walkability audit training to GirlTrek organizers in 2017. Using photo-voice and web-based technology developed by Stanford Prevention Research, #GirlTrekFixIt will empower local community members to identify the barriers and facilitators of walking in high-need neighborhoods.  GirlTrek organizers will collaborate with other community-based organizations to influence local decision makers to support infrastructure or policies that improve walkability in their communities.

This presentation hopes to share success and learning opportunities of using photo-voice technology to assess walking and walkability with community walking groups.  If available, we’ll also summarize the initial findings from the walking audits.

Presenter: Carmen D. Harris, MPH, Chief of Social Impact and Strategic Partnerships, GirlTrek

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Time for a Little Chat: Using Twitter to Support Walkability Initiatives

This presentation is part of the Walking into the Future: Technology and the Walking Movement session.

Many organizations have yet to take the first step of hosting or participating in a Twitter chat. They are missing out on a great opportunity! Chats provide the opportunity to inform, advocate, and enhance your peer network. This presentation provides an overview of recent walkability-related Twitter chats organized by or supported by the National Aging and Disability Transportation Center. Topics covered include the basics of conducting Tweet chats, developing engaging questions for a chat, setting up the logistics, drawing potential participants to your chat, and using the results of a chat to continue the conversation on walkability and accessibility issues.

Presenter: Rachel Beyerle, Communications Director, National Aging and Disability Transportation Center

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

“Click to Walk” in Allentown Pennsylvania

This presentation is part of the Walking into the Future: Technology and the Walking Movement session.

The Allentown Health Bureau launched a citywide walking program called Million Clicks for Million Hearts.   The program uses unique “click to walk” technology whereby registrants receive a free keytab, synched to Jobclock devices posted at walking paths around the city.  Members use their keytab to “click in “for every walk.   The program is marketed to the city’s culturally diverse population via multimedia outlets.  Monthly prize drawings and messaging to members via email and social media help maintain enthusiasm and engagement. This program was one of 50 selected nationwide by the Healthiest Cities and Counties Challenge as a finalist in 2016.

Presenter: Alexandra Sodl, M.S., R.D., LDN, Public Health Dietitian, City of Allentown Bureau of Health

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Walking into the Future: Technology and the Walking Movement (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

The walking movement has many tools and resources at its disposal to engage, educate, and mobilize its members. Here how communities and organizations are using technology  to get individuals physically, mentally, and socially active.

Room: State 3

Moderator: Sandy Leuthner, Communications Consultant, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota.

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

 

Let’s Move More at St Paul Public Housing (3:00pm-6:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Come together, move more and connect with others. This is the simple idea behind monthly “Walk with a Doctor” events and walking groups for people of all ages and abilities at St Paul Public Housing Agency (PHA). Join residents and staff for September’s monthly walk at Dunedin Terrace and Hi- Rise to experience this ‘walking movement’ at St Paul PHA. We’ll share our strategy, tips, and lessons learned so you can start the movement in your community. Then we’ll head out for a group walk. Afterwards, we’ll socialize, enjoy snacks and hear from some PHA wellness walking champions.

Facilitator: Betsy Christensen, MPH

 

Park Listener* (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Discover a new engagement tool that has proven successful in reaching voices of traditionally underrepresented groups.  Join this hands-on, direct community engagement workshop where we’ll walk around a future park site to listen to residents, workers, students and folks passing through. We will visit a park site in St. Paul where you will take on the role of “park listener” by pairing up to interview students from Gordon Parks High School and other community members that you encounter in the area. After you are finished interviewing we will come back together to reflect on the experience and your findings.

Facilitators:

  • Jenna Fletcher, Program Director, Trust for Public Land
  • Michael Johnson, Community Organizer, Union Park District Council

 

Walking as a Community Engagement Tool: A Macalester College Case Study* (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Walking around a neighborhood to listen to the people in the area was a strategy used by Macalester College students in Professor Trudeau’s Geography course to obtain qualitative information for an asset mapping project with a local community partner, Union Park District Council. In this session participants will experience the steps of this walking interview technique through interviewing Macalester students. In addition to exposing students to what it is like to be the subject in an interview, program participants doing the interviewing will gain a greater understanding about this engagement technique and identify ways to incorporate into their own work. Please note that attendees of this workshop will meet at Macalester College at 1pm.

 

Experiencing Mobility Through Different Lenses: Navigating the Public Right Away* (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This workshop will focus on urban design through an accessibility lens. We will explore the public-rights-of-way of downtown Saint Paul while considering access and inclusion for people of all abilities. Before the field experience participants will be grounded in a background on disability, ableism, accessibility, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Participants will have the opportunity to experience the pedestrian realm, including sidewalks, streets, crosswalks, curb ramps, pedestrian signals, and other components, while using a mobility or other service device. There will be ample time for discussion along the way.

Facilitator: Kjensmo Walker, Transportation Accessibility Advisory Committee Chair, Metropolitan Council

 

Minneapolis Warehouse District and North Loop* (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Take a tour Minneapolis’ fastest growing neighborhood. The Minneapolis Warehouse District, including the North Loop, makes an attractive argument for urban revitalization in a historic district. The neighborhood enjoys great accessibility to public transportation, a diverse economic footprint with an explosion in housing, and close proximity to downtown. In this tour we will examine how the neighborhood has evolved, including issues of accessibility and safety in a historical context, how the neighborhood association fought for their own school, and the ripple effect of revitalizing warehouse districts.

Facilitators: 

  • Phil Ailiff, North Loop Neighborhood Association Board of Directors and Minneapolis Pedestrians Advisory Committee
  • Christian Huelsman, Executive Director, Spring in Our Steps

 

Commons Park Development: Creating a Space that is Friendly for All* (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

How do you transform an area that is high demand for people walking or using wheelchairs, and people on bikes, to be friendly for all? In this workshop we’ll explore the area around Commons Park, a 4.2 acre public green space in downtown Minneapolis, designed for recreation, everyday activities and events for residents, workers, and visitors. The streets adjoining the park include the city’s first sidewalk-grade protected bike lanes. Delineating space that is safe and comfortable for people walking and people on bikes brings unique design challenges, especially at intersections. We’ll explore lessons learned through this design and implementation process.

Facilitators:

  • Beth Elliott, Senior Urban Planner and Planning Group Leader, Stantec
  • Phil Gravel, Principal, Stantec
  • Amanda Wigen, Director of Programming & Events, Green Minneapolis

 

 

Greenway Trail Systems: Improving the Health and Equity of Suburban Communities (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This walking tour of the River to River Greenway will showcase Dakota County’s innovative greenway trail system. In the suburbs, the car can often dominate, and walking is frequently not practical or pleasant. The River to River Greenway helps to address this imbalance as part of Dakota County’s planned 200 mile regional greenway system. It links the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers with a high quality trail experience. The trail connects three municipalities, three schools, seven parks, a private nature center, and two commercial areas and will have countless benefits. Our tour will cover a two-mile segment of this trail.

Facilitators:

  • Lil Leatham, Planner, Dakota County
  • Kurt Chatfield, Planning Supervisor, Dakota County
  • John Mertens, Senior Planner, Dakota County

 

Stop For Me: Conducting Enforcement & Education Events (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

The St. Paul Stop for Me pedestrian safety campaign is a collaboration between the community and local government to use enforcement and education to improve safety for people who use St. Paul sidewalks and cross the streets. Stop for Me events are taking place at crossings throughout in intersections across the city. This workshop will provide a brief overview of the program and then show how to set up and conduct an event. We will participate in observe an actual enforcement event with police enforcing the state’s crosswalk law as a part of this workshop.

Facilitators:

  • Jeremy Ellison, Toward Zero Deaths Coordinator, St. Paul Police Department
  • Heidi Schallberg, Stop for Me Steering Committee Member

 

Dale St. Bridge: From Community Action to Infrastructure* (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

In this workshop we will follow the footsteps taken by community members and transportation planners to replace the Dale Street Bridge over Interstate 94: from conducting a walkability survey, to securing funding, to influencing plans to replace the bridge to include improvements for people using the sidewalks. We’ll explore how a community-led survey resulted in a tangible infrastructure project, navigating the challenges and opportunities of community-public sector partnerships, and leading community engagement in a diverse neighborhood with a deep history of negative impacts of freeway construction. Join us to explore connections between health equity, environmental justice, and transportation infrastructure improvements.

Facilitator: Carol Swenson, Dale Street Bridge Project Coordinator, Summit-University Planning Council

 

 

Jane’s Walk: A Walking Movement for Better Cities (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

The Jane’s Walk Festival (janeswalk.org)  is a global movement to connect people and places at the grassroots. In 2016, over 1,000 Jane’s Walks took place in 212 cities in 36 countries across six continents. Jane’s Walks organizers from St. Paul and San Jose are teaming up to share their experiences organizing successful Jane’s Walks in a hands-on ”walkshop.” Participants will take part in a walk along the Mississippi River and discuss possible walk focus topics, how walks can be organized, and how they can take this transformative, community-based experience back with them in time to organize Jane’s Walks and Walk Leaders for the May 2018 festival.

Facilitators: 

  • Jaime Fearer, AICP, Deputy Director, California Walks
  • Carol Swenson, Dale Street Bridge Project Coordinator, Summit-University Planning Council

 

Walking with GirlTrek for Health, Change and Healing* (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Join GirlTrek’s Team Baraza for a walk and learn how they harness the power of walking, peer support, and leading by example. GirlTrek is a national organization focused on improving the health of Black women and girls by creating a culture of healthy decision making and drawing inspiration from Black history to contextualize health as a broader civil rights issue. “We walk to heal our bodies, inspire our families, and to reclaim the streets of our neighborhoods. We believe in the discipline and power of walking to transform our lives, enliven our communities, and restore our humanity.” girltrek.org

Facilitators:

  • Carmen Harris, Chief of Social Impact and Strategic Partnerships, Girl Trek
  • Monisha Washington, Community Health Worker, Saint Paul, Minnesota, Girl Trek Community Ambassador, Baraza GirlTrek Twin Cities Team

 

Minneapolis’ First Shared Street: 29th Street West* (11:00am-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This walking tour will visit Minneapolis’ 29th Street West: the city’s first shared-use street (woonerf) in the epicenter of the lively LynLake neighborhood.  The street was designed so that people walking, people biking, and people in motor vehicles all can use the same space.  There are no curbs, encouraging all users to access and use the entire public street width. Innovative traffic calming and design elements are present to slow drivers, along with public artwork, designed by local artists, to support a leisurely pace through the corridor.

Facilitators:

  • Matthew Dyrdahl, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Minneapolis
  • Tracy Lindgren, Professional Engineer, Department of Public Works, City of Minneapolis
  • Donald Pflaum, PE, PTOE, Transportation Planner, City of Minneapolis

 

Small Town in a Big City: Seward Neighborhood Walking Tour* (11:00am-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

In this workshop we’ll explore the Seward neighborhood, a vibrant area located along the Mississippi River in south Minneapolis, close to downtown, the University, and Saint Paul.  We will tour Franklin Avenue, Seward’s primary commercial corridor, home to shops, restaurants, the Seward food co-op, several arts and cultural organizations. The corridor is recently updated with infrastructure improvements, including the multi-modal Franklin Avenue Bridge that will serve people driving, biking, and walking well into the future. We’ll see the how collaboration in street design, community activism in preserving historic assets and motivating change is shaping the public realm in this celebrated neighborhood.

Facilitators:

  • Andy Hestness, Project Manager, Planning and Economic Development, City of Saint Paul
  • Marne Zafar, Milwaukee Avenue Homeowners Association and Seward Neighborhood Group
  • Scot and Kayf Ahmed, Owners, Capitol Café
  • Renee Spillum, Real Estate Development Manager, Seward Redesign
  • Sierra Saunders, Multimodal Planner, Hennepin County
  • Jordan Kocak, Pedestrian and Bicycle Planner, Hennepin County
  • Shaina Brassard, Business Development Program Manager, Seward Redesign, Inc.
  • Theresa Nelson, Program Manager, Transit for Livable Communities and St Paul Smart Trips

 

Bus Stop and Walk to School* (9:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Come and experience just what a student does when their school participates in a WEEKLY Bus Stop and Walk—which includes a lovely walk in a distinct city neighborhood. Participants will be picked up by a school bus at the conference location. The bus will drive to walk-drop spot where they will unload and be greeted by school/district staff. Participants will walk along the designated route to school, about a half mile, supported by staff, volunteers and school patrol. Along the way participants will see recent infrastructure improvements that are a direct result of the Bus Stop and Walk effort.

Facilitators:

  • Jenny Bordon, Safe Routes to School, Minneapolis Public Schools
  • Carol Rees Grady, Licensed School Nurse, Saint Paul Public Schools.

 

ReConnecting Rondo* (9:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Friendly Streets Initiative and ReConnectRondo will take participants on a walking tour that will teach them about the past and current efforts to address various issues in Rondo including reconciliation, food access, bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure and safety. Beginning at Dale Street light rail stop we will learn about efforts to guarantee stops for all residents and efforts to improve walking conditions to the light rail. We will walk through several community gardens, traverse along frontage roads parallel to the highway to learn about the potential for the creation of a land bridge in Rondo, and visit a local favorite coffee shop. The tour will end back at the Victoria Station.

Facilitator: Kim Club, ReConnecting Rondo

 

10-Minute Walk to a Park* CANCELED

Wednesday, September 13

Cities that prioritize parks and safe places for people to walk demonstrate support for people to be healthy and active.  The Trust for Public Land has set a visionary goal that everyone living in urban America will have a park within a 10-minute walk of home.  In this workshop, we will experience the “10-minute walk to a park” by visiting three St. Paul parks on foot: a nature sanctuary, a working farm within a park, and a future park being developed near a light rail station.  Find out how walking IN the park feels compared to walking TO the park.

Facilitator:  Jenna Fletcher, Program Director, Trust for Public Land

 

Wheels in Motion (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This walking/strolling workshop, led by Overcome Yours founder Garrett Brumfield and Walk2Connect founder Jonathon Stalls, will cover a two-mile radius and include stops at various establishments and landmarks to assess their degree of accessibility for people with mobility impairments. Participants will be given the opportunity to use wheelchairs, walkers and others assistive devices to simulate and better understand the daily challenges faced by individuals with mobility impairments.  Garrett will share a few personal stories of the accessibility challenges he has faced and overcome living with cerebral palsy. Before concluding the workshop, the participants and facilitators will gather to discuss their observations and ways to improve accessibility.

Facilitators:

  • Garrett Brumfield, Founder, Overcome Yours
  • Jonathon Stalls, Founder and Member-Owner, Walk2Connect

 

St. Paul Central Station: A Walking Case Study in How to Turn a Place Around (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

In the Fall of 2016 a wide range of businesses, civic and community organizations teamed up with the Musicant Group to create a more inviting and vibrant space for transit riders, employees, residents, and visitors in the largely vacant block surrounding the Green Line’s Central Station in Downtown St. Paul. Over the next year The Musicant Group led the coalition’s placemaking efforts to transform what was a bleak environment into a safe and inviting space for all. Experience first hand how the placemaking process was deployed to unite disparate and often divided public and private actors around a common cause.

Facilitators:

  • Max Musicant, Founder, The Musicant Group
  • Katherine O’Neil, Project Manager, The Musicant Group

 

Let’s Go for a Walk: How to Host a Walkability Workshop (8:30-12:30)

Wednesday, September 13

An interactive session for participates to learn how to plan for and host a community walkability workshop that leads to local action planning. Attendees will be led on a walk and talk through how to strategically organize a walk, develop an invitation list and select a route that highlights a representative example of the communities built environment.  The session format will provide an opportunity to practice leading a workshop and for peer-to-peer learning.

Workshop attendees will be:

  • Able to explain the purpose and benefits of community walkability workshops (“walkshops”).
  • Able to explain the principles of a walkable community
  • Able to explain the steps in planning for and hosting a strategic community walkability workshop.
  • Able to plan walking route in their community that represents the existing conditions and a workgroup agenda.

Facilitators

  • Ellen Pillsbury, AICP, Active Transportation Coordinator with the Minnesota Department of Health
  • Jasna Hadzic-Stanek, Transportation Planner, Minnesota Department of Transportation
  • Annie Harala, Northeast Minnesota Regional Statewide Health Improvement partnership (SHIP) Coordinator, Healthy Northland
  • Chris Kimber, Minnesota Department of Health (MDH)

 

Identifying Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Gaps Using Walk Assessments and Mobile Technologies* (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Identifying infrastructure needs for improving safety and comfort is critical to increasing the number of children who walk and bike to school. To identify these needs, a walk assessment (sometimes called a walk audit) is often used to observe dangerous street crossings and other barriers. In this Mobile Workshop, participants will travel by bus to a Saint Paul school and conduct a walk assessment of the school grounds and surrounding streets. There will be a discussion and demonstration of how new mobile technologies can be used to gather information that can make analysis, observation, and data collection during and after walk assessments more efficient and streamlined.

Facilitators:

  • Tom Baron, AICP, Associate Planner ECWRPC
  • Melissa Kraemer Badtke, Principal Transportation Planner and Safe Routes to School Coordinator, East Central WI Regional Planning Commission
  • Ashley Tracy, Planner for the Regional Safe Routes to School Program, East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission
  • Tyler DeBruin, GIS Assistant, East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission
  • Jimmy Shoemaker, Planner, ALTA Design
  • Colin Harris, Civil Engineer and Project Manager, ALTA Planning

 

Nicollet Mall and Washington Avenue: Walking in the Heart of Downtown Minneapolis* (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This workshop showcases two major, unique infrastructure projects in downtown Minneapolis, Nicollet Mall and Washington Avenue, newly modernized to prioritize people who walk. Both projects are in the heart of downtown Minneapolis and are accessible by the Green Line light rail. We’ll explore these two intersecting streets that are very different in character – one being an iconic pedestrian and transit mall and the other a major County arterial. Their renovations shared common processes that started with a vision to elevate the pedestrian realm in the city, engagement approaches that brought along stakeholders, and intentional design and implementation practices.

Facilitators:

  • Nathan Ellingson, P.E., Professional Engineer – Hennepin County Transportation Project Delivery
  • Todd Halunen, PLA, CLARB
  • Peter Hendee Brown, AIA, AICP, PHD,
  • Rick Kreuser, Project Manager, Transportation Engineering & Design City of Minneapolis – Public Works
  • Ben Shardlow, Director of Urban Design for the MPLS Downtown Council & Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District.

 

Vibrant City Streets: Where Play and Walking Intersect (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

What if cities were designed with kids and families in mind? On this playability walking tour, we’ll explore different blocks and street corners in St. Paul to see what makes a space inviting for kids to play versus places where improvements could be made. For example, does the local transit hub include playful elements that encourage kids to safely use their minds and bodies while waiting for the bus? Opportunities for creative and active play can be incorporated into cities when communities come together to put kids first. Join us to get ideas for your own city and neighborhood!

Facilitator: Priya Madrecki, Senior Manager of Strategic Communications, KaBOOM!

 

Historic Rondo Neighborhood: Past, Present, Future* (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Rondo is St. Paul’s oldest African American neighborhood, with a rich history of welcoming newcomers, resilience, and deep sense of community. In the 1960s, freeway construction destroyed Rondo Avenue, wiping out hundreds of African American businesses and homes. This walking workshop will introduce the places that tell the history of the neighborhood and the people who contribute to the resilience of the community. Participants will learn what community members and public officials are doing now to reconcile past harms and the trauma caused by construction of the freeway to create a future of hope for the community and the neighborhood.

Facilitator: Melvin Giles

 

Street Synergy: All-Inclusive Considerations for a Two-Way Cycletrack in a Central Business District (8:30am-12:30pm)

Wednesday, September 13

Join a walking workshop of St. Paul’s Capital City Bikeway and see firsthand how the city’s first protected bikeway in the heart of downtown is designed with consideration for all people using the street, while minimizing multimodal conflict. We will talk about the trade-offs and lessons learned throughout the many facets of the design and implementation process: from community engagement to how to support collaboration between engineers, urban designers, and planners; from the importance of placemaking to create vibrant places for people to going beyond simple ADA compliance; from artistic and innovative stormwater management to designing for winter maintenance.

Facilitators:

  • Reuben Collins, P.E., Transportation Planner/Engineer, City of St. Paul, MN
  • Todd Grugel, P. E. MNDOT ADA Program Engineer

 

Where Do We Go From Here? Closing Plenary (10:45am-12:00pm)

Friday, September 15

After a productive and inspiring time in St. Paul, MN, we will close the 2017 National Walking Summit with a look at the lessons learned and topics discussed including a special presentation by the Theater for Public Policy. We will leave energized, motivated, and united around a single purpose to make every community vital and vibrant.

This will be located in the Minnesota Ballroom.

The Power of Walk! Bike! Fun!

This presentation is part of the Education of Youth and Community Members in Safe Routes to School session.

In this session, the Minnesota Department of Transportation, Bicycle Alliance of Minnesota (BikeMN) and Blue Earth County Public Health will share the power of “Walk! Bike! Fun!”, a pedestrian and bicycle safety curriculum, from the state to the local level. MnDOT will share how the Safe Routes to School program has supported the development of “Walk! Bike! Fun!” BikeMN will share the details of implementing the curriculum, and the power of teachers teaching kids about safe walking and bike skills that last a lifetime. Blue Earth County Public Health will share how the power of Safe Routes to School and the “Walk! Bike! Fun!” curriculum in schools in Mankato and New Ulm, MN have successfully improved the walkability and bike-ability of these communities.

Presenters:

  • Michelle Kiefer, Safe Routes to School Program Manager, Bike Alliance of Minnesota
  • Dave Cowan,  MnDOT Safe Routes to School Coordinator
  • Kristen Friedrichs, Blue Earth County Public Health SHIP Program Coordinator

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Everybody Walks!

This presentation is part of the Education of Youth and Community Members in Safe Routes to School session.

How do you get a community outside onto sidewalks and trails built for walking? The City of Decatur is four square miles in size with 74 miles of streets, 62 miles of sidewalks and a variety of short trails.

Attendees will learn about ideas on how to get their community walking! Ideas include weekly and monthly walks led by staff and/or volunteers, Safe Routes to School, Walk With a Doc and some unique ideas such as Sunday Strolls and “Bright at Night” walks.  The goal of this presentation is to model inexpensive and free ways that will motivate community members to get out and walk!

Presenter: Cheryl Burnette

“Feet on the Ground – Elementary Pedestrian Education”

This presentation is part of the Education of Youth and Community Members in Safe Routes to School session.

This session provides an in-depth look into one of California’s newest safety education programs – Walk Smart. Walk Smart provides critical “on-foot” safety training to 1st – 3rd grade students through presentations and walking field trips.  Piloted in 2016, Walk Smart is the result of an over 10-year collaboration between non-profit Ecology Action and Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency. In this session, you will learn strategies for creating and deepening partnerships between non-profit organizations, public health agencies and other community partners, tips for creating similar hands-on walk safety programs and valuable lessons learned from Walk Smart’s first year.

Presenters: Elise Ehrheart and Jeanne LePage

Safe Routes to School and Community Walking Programs and Partnerships (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

Learn tips and techniques to create lasting partnerships and programmatic best practices from established walking education and encouragement programs.  Hear success stories from California, Minnesota and Georgia that reflect partnerships through community engagement, curricula development and K-12 education programs!

Room: Kellogg 3

Moderator

Kate Moening, Field Services Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Walking School Bus – Let’s Get Serious

This presentation is part of the Walking School Bus session.

Robert has spent 10 years helping to create Walking School Bus programs in 30 states and over 200 school districts. He believes that the key to sustainability and equity comes from sophisticated and robust programs. Essentially that when advocates and professionals say that creating Walking School Bus programs is easy, or that “organic” or “grassroots” programs can be effective, that we’re inadvertently contributing to program failure.

Presenter: Robert Johnson, Director of Consulting, PedNet

 

The Walking School Bus: Creating a Community Conversation on Walkability

This presentation is part of the Walking School Bus session.

Learn how one hospital-based health coalition created the Walking School Bus program and started a conversation about walkability in its community. This session will cover the experiences of seven schools and more than 400 participants who have embraced the project, and how walkability assessments are laying the groundwork for improved policies, infrastructure and programming to encourage walking for transit as well as leisure/recreation. The presenter will also share lessons learned and tips for planning a successful campaign as well as tools such as promotional materials, forms, walkability assessment tools and advocacy resources.

Presenter: Margaret Sotham

Small Steps Big Impact, West Union on the Move.

This presentation is part of the Walking School Bus session.

Gundersen Palmer Community Health is a nonprofit hospital-based public health department serving the residents of Fayette County, Iowa. Our 2015 CHNA-HIP survey showed 40% obesity in Fayette County adults and adult residents’ #1 health concern was obesity. We looked at one of our most successful programs, Walking School Bus which has been sustained by adult volunteers walking children to school twice a week. We then partnered with local city government for policy and infrastructure changes, and regional stakeholders to uphold the Iowa Healthiest State Initiative. GPCH, the City of West Union, various business and community stakeholders are launching the West Union Walkability Initiative Spring 2017, featuring daily Walking School Buses, Whistle Walks, five new Little Libraries, and community Walking Map. This collaborative partnership initiative has and will impact lives for generations to come.

Presenter: Jessica Wegner, RN, Gundersen Palmer Community Health

The Walking School Bus: Creating a Community Conversation on Walkability

This presentation is part of the Walking School Bus session.

Learn how one hospital-based health coalition created the Walking School Bus program and started a conversation about walkability in its community. This session will cover the experiences of seven schools and more than 400 participants who have embraced the project, and how walkability assessments are laying the groundwork for improved policies, infrastructure and programming to encourage walking for transit as well as leisure/recreation. The presenter will also share lessons learned and tips for planning a successful campaign as well as tools such as promotional materials, forms, walkability assessment tools and advocacy resources.

Presenter: Margaret Sotham, Director, Healthy West Kendall, West Kendall Baptist Hospital

Download a Copy of the Presentation

Walking School Bus (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

This session is being organized by the Safe Routes to School National Partnership. The session will explore the idea of the Walking School Bus as a way to create healthy, active, and engaged communities.

Room: Kellogg 3

Moderator

Cass Isidro, Executive Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Safe Routes to School Planning and Engagement (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

This presentation, hosted and moderated by the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, will look at the planning and development of programs that encourage physical activity through school-related initiatives.

Room: Governors 1

Moderator: Andrew Pasillas, Southern California Regional Policy Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership Download a Copy of Andrew’s Presentation Here

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

 

 

Walking the Walk: How Cities and Universities Can Work Together to Increase Access to Physical Activity

This presentation is part of the Safe Routes to School Planning and Engagement Session.

This session will share an example of a successful and creative partnership between an instructor from the University of Central Oklahoma and a city planner from Oklahoma City. College students learned how the built environment influences walking behaviors and public health. Student-gathered data greatly increased the amount of useful data that guide local government decisions to improve the pedestrian realm. This session can assist those with an interest in collaboration between universities and cities to improve walkability. Multiple perspectives (city planner, instructor, and students), project tools, grading criteria, and lessons learned will be shared.

Presenters

  • Jamie Dunnington, Instructor, University of Central Oklahoma and John Tankard, Associate , The City of Oklahoma City
  • Kate Mohr, Community/Public Health student, University of Central Oklahoma
  • Tyler Scullawl, Community/Public Health student, University of Central Oklahoma

Download the Slides Here

Looking at the Big Picture: District-wide School Travel Plans

This presentation is part of the Safe Routes to School Planning and Development session.

School Travel Plans, an important tool for improving walking and bicycling conditions, are usually completed at the individual school level. In larger urban districts it becomes more difficult and time consuming to complete School Travel Plans and for stakeholders to equitably decide which issues to prioritize. Learn how graduate students at Rutgers University engaged local community members to develop district-wide school travel plans that identify barriers to walking and bicycling and explore potential solutions and in the process, developed a model the NJ Department of Transportation can use for conducting future district-wide school travel plans.

Presenters

  • Sean Meehan, Project Manager, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers University
  • Leigh Ann Von Hagen, AICP/PP, Senior Research Specialist, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers University

Download a Copy of the Slides Here

Crafting Inclusive and Equitable Safe Routes to School Programs (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Equity in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) means including a diversity of participants and ensuring that everyone has access to and can take advantage of the resources provided through the program. Successful SRTS programs engage the local communities by working with community-based organizations and celebrate the families’ diversity as an asset to promoting active transportation.

This session will discuss specific strategies for creating inclusive programs in San Mateo County, the City of Tacoma, and Minneapolis Public Schools.

Room: Kellogg 2

Moderator

Holly Nickel, Coalitions and Equity Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership

Presenters

  • Theresa Vallez-Kelly, MPH, Coordinator, Safe Routes to School, Student Services Division, San Mateo County Office of Education
  • Hannah Day-Kapell, Senior Planning Associate, Alta Planning + Design
  • Julie Danzl, Student Wellness Manager, Minneapolis Public Schools

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Bridging the Gap: Forming Cross-Sector Connections for a Collective Impact on Walkability (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

This panel highlights cross-agency collaboration between transportation and health professionals. Four walkability champions across the country will tell their stories to showcase four avenues through which innovative partnerships across sectors have been – and can be – implemented. The presenters will focus on how their training opportunities and expertise have bridged gaps between transportation and health sectors at state and local levels. Their scope of partnership work includes sharing data sources, forming common goals, building standardized tools, emphasizing equal access, and implementing sustainable solutions. They will emphasize the power of partnerships and the effectiveness of facilitating strategic discussions in a community setting.

Room: Kellogg 1

Presenters

  • Kelly Cornett, MS, Health Scientist, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Heather Gramp, MPH, Policy Analyst, Oregon Health Authority–Public Health Division
  • Jasna Hadzic, Principal Planner Transportation, Minnesota Department of Transportation
  • Mari Brunner, Planner, Southwest Region Planning Commission
  • Ashley Christensen, Regional Safe Routes to School Coordinator, Upper Explorerland Regional Planning Commission

Rural and Tribal Walkability Challenges – Examples and Solutions (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

Building walkability and livability in small towns and rural areas requires specific techniques and resources. This interactive workshop will explore the most common challenges facing rural and tribal communities. Using the planning construct of the 5 E’s – Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement and Evaluation, this interactive workshop will showcase strategies and tools that can benefit rural communities and tribal nations as they strive to improve pedestrian access, enhance the built environment and overcome challenges to finding resources, and build human capital and momentum to become more livable.

Room: Kellogg 2

Presenters

  • Jeanne Anthony, JK Anthony Associates
  • Michia Casebier, M.G. Tech-Writing, LLC
  • Brian Fellows, Amec Foster Weeler

 

Walkable, Not Unaffordable: Creating Walkable Communities Without Displacement (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Although walkability can bring economic benefits to an area, the economic boom that may result from walkability can have negative side effects – increased rent, redevelopment and displacement of existing communities. Despite good intentions, advocates can sometimes hurt the communities they are trying to help, driving opposition to these efforts. Some strategies, such as early engagement, more holistic approaches to development of walkable communities, or new ways to approach walkability, can address those problems. This workshop will feature transportation planners and advocates who have successfully navigated these issues, who will discuss their experiences and lessons learned.

Room: Kellogg 1

Presenters

  • Patrick Wojahn, Director of Government Relations, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
  • Charles Brown, Senior Researcher and Adjunct Professor, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University
  • Nieeta Presley, Executive Director, Aurora St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation
  • Jake Spano, Mayor, St. Louis Park, MN

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Grow! Play! Celebrate! Transform Your Street! (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

Make your streets a place to grow food, play music, engage in art, discover your community and connect with your family and neighbors! This session will show you how to incentivize walking and physical activity — especially in disadvantaged and diverse neighborhoods — by incorporating art, play and other diverse activities into your streetscapes. Using case studies from diverse and disadvantaged communities throughout the U.S. and the around world, we will explore how streetscapes can attract residents, encourage play and physical activity, provide a sense of place, express local culture and make neighborhoods and communities safer and healthier.

Room: Kellogg 3

Presenters

  • Mukul Malhotra, Principal MIG, Inc.
  • Christina Frank, Designer, MIG, Inc.
  • Ryan Swanson, Designer, The Urban Conga

 

 

The Road Begins with Assessment-Walkability Stories from Neighborly South Dakota Cities and Towns (10:15am-11:45am)

Thursday, September 14

Stories of assessment to bring communities together and build capacity for improving walkability and active transportation in frontier, rural and urban South Dakota communities will be shared. Delivered in a fast-paced, 20×20 format, this session will showcase several diverse experiences. Each panelist will have 20 slides of 20 seconds each to inform and engage the audience before their time runs out! The findings from a summative evaluation study of the South Dakota Department of Health’s Walkable Communities Technical Assistance Program will be shared and comparisons between the two models and next steps identified in the study will be discussed.

Room: State 1

Presenters

Walkin’ the Bakken

This presentation is part of the Walking and Walkability in Rural Communities panel.

Come hear how a small community of 900 in the midst of the Bakken boom was able to focus efforts on improving walkability.  Ray, ND, has a major 4-lane road that cuts through the center of town, limiting walking options across the community.  One solution to this problem was the installation of a HAWK signal.  Come hear how the community has created partnerships through planning and practical construction with safe routes to schools, a downtown sidewalk district, and a voluntary program for residential neighborhoods to participate in the City’s annual construction program for sidewalks.

Presenter: Brent Moore, AICP, Planning Director, Interstate Engineering, Inc.

One Size Does Not Fit All: Design Resources for Small Towns and Rural Communities

This presentation is part of the Walking and Walkability in Rural Communities panel.

Explore the new FHWA endorsed guide for Small Town and Rural Multimodal Networks, the facility design guide focused on the smaller scale places left out of guides such as the NACTO Street Design Guide and ITE Walkable Urban Thoroughfares report. Learn from this idea book for smaller communities, with visualizations and guidance for contemporary walking facilities. Based in FHWA and AASHTO guidance, the Small Town and Rural guide applies a flexible design approach to creating more comfortable places for walking. This session will feature detailed design guidance for rural-oriented facility types, and examples from peer communities.

Presenters

  • Rose Ryan, AICP, Senior Planner, Alta Planning + Design
  • Colin Harris, PE, Engineering Associate, Alta Planning + Design

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Walking and Walkability in Rural Communities (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Different environments or types of communities offer different opportunities and challenges for promoting walking and walkability. Creating vital and vibrant communities in rural areas requires a unique set of resources, toolkits, and programs. This session will feature speakers who are working on the ground to create active, healthy, and engaged rural communities.

Room: Governors 2

Moderator

Eric Oberg, Director of Trail Development, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

 

 

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: The Role of the Walking Movement in Promoting Equity and Social Justice Lunchtime Plenary (12:00pm-2:00pm)

Thursday, September 14

Join us for a lunchtime plenary session that will explore how the walking movement can and should play a role in issues related to equity and social justice. The speakers will discuss how walking and walkable communities can be used to promote equity and social justice.

This will be located in the Minnesota Ballroom.

Featured Speakers:

United States Report Card on Walking and Walkable Communities (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

The National Physical Activity Plan Alliance has developed a system for evaluating the status of the U.S. in areas that are central to increasing population-level walking behavior.  In this session members of the expert panel that developed the Report Card will: a) summarize the process that was followed in selecting constructs for inclusion in the Report Card; b) explain the grading scheme that was adopted; and c) present the rationale for assignment of grades to each of the nine constructs included in the Report Card.

Room: Kellogg 1

Presenters

  • Russell R. Pate, Professor, University of South Carolina
  • Amy Eyler, Assistant Dean for Public Health, Associate Professor, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Tom Richards, Director of Corporate Engagement, American Council on Exercise
  • Kate Kraft, Executive Director, America Walks

Download a Copy of the Presentation Here

Measuring What Matters: Opportunities and Challenges with Performance Measures (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

This panel explores how to best orient active transportation planning efforts in a performance-based context. Streetsmart is an evidence-based tool that helps make the case for smarter transportation investments using a performance-based approach. We’ll then clarify goal-setting processes through the use of logic models that help differentiate outputs from outcomes in a planning process, and offer up a range of new metrics for active transportation programs. We’ll also discuss the emerging challenges in the use of conventional performance measures. Finally, we’ll discuss emerging opportunities for performance measures to move cross-sector collaborations from theoretical to practical.

Room: Governors 3

Presenters

  • Kelly Rodgers, Executive Director, Streetsmart
  • Heidi Guenin, Senior Associate, Gridworks
  • Jessica Roberts, Principal, Alta Planning and Design

Slides and Resources

The Importance of Political Leadership – Elected Officials Panel (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

In this session, you will learn about successful tactics employed by legislators to establish funding mechanisms that support trail development demanded by their constituents. A key focus will be on generating ‘buy in’ for these initiatives among key stakeholder groups, including legislative and agency bodies as well as competing interest groups. This panel of political leaders will discuss the importance of active transportation in helping local communities to thrive via economic development, health and safety, environmental sustainability and inclusiveness/diversity. Strategies used to ensure that the citizens these elected officials represent are positive and supportive of their efforts to facilitate pedestrian infrastructure will also be highlighted.

Room: State 3

Moderator

Brian K. Housh, Midwest Policy Manager, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

Panelists

  • Senator D. Scott Dibble (DFL) District 61, State of Minnesota
  • A C Wharton, Jr, Attorney, Principal of The A C Wharton Group, former Mayor of Shelby County and the City of Memphis, Tennessee
  • Michael Wojcik, Councilmember, Rochester, MN
  • Mary Lee Nielson, Sheyenne River Valley National Scenic Byway/Valley City Convention & Visitors Bureau, former Mayor of Valley City, South Dakota

Creative Placemaking at the Intersection of Community Engagement and Pedestrian Safety in Little East Africa, San Diego (9:00am-10:30am)

Friday, September 15

A panel of San Diego-based community advocates, artists, and stakeholders will discuss their successes and challenges in an ongoing community-led placemaking effort to repurpose a blighted, dirt right-of-way in the Little East Africa neighborhood of urban San Diego into a multi-generational Gathering Space. Placemaking strategies lead to greater community engagement and, therefore, more salient and lasting designs.  Here, the community is interested in traffic calming along a dangerous corridor and enhancing a sense of destination through cultural representation in the built environment.  Through this case study, the panel will explore transportation justice and community planning in under-resourced communities.

Room: Governors 2

Moderator

Ben Stone,  Arts and Culture Director, Transportation for America

Presenters

  • Anastasia Brewster, Active Transportation Coordinator, City Heights Community Development Corporation
  • Randy Van Vleck, Active Transportation Manager, City Heights Community Development Corporation
  • Ahmed Malinomar, Community Engagement Specialist, City Heights Community Development Corporation
  • Mohamed Osman, Artist, MA+O Design House

Livable Communities for All Ages (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

Vital and vibrant communities meet the physical, mental, and social health needs of all of its citizens, regardless of age and ability. This panel represents work being done to make sure livable communities are places where people from ages 8 to 80 can be active, engaged, and healthy.

Room: State 2

Moderator

 Bill Armbruster, Advisor, AARP Livable Communities Programs

Presenters

For more information on the individual presentations of this session, click on the links below.

Measuring Neighborhood Walkability Surrounding Senior Housing

This presenter is part of the Livable Communities for All Ages panel.

Despite the known health benefits of walking for older adults, there is still limited data about the features of the built environment that affect their walkability. One of the greatest challenges is choosing a suitable method for evaluating the tangible features of the walking environment that impact active living. In this study, a microscale sidewalk assessment was applied to objectively measure the walkability of neighborhoods surrounding three selected senior resident facilities in Manhattan, New York. Unbiased evidence identifying the levels of walkability is an essential step toward creating successful active living communities for older adults.

Presenter: Bernardita P. Calinao, PhD, Deputy Director, Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science

Don’t Forget About Us: Exploring the Interests of Youth and Older Adult Populations in Honolulu’s Community and Urban Development

This presenter is part of the Livable Communities for All Ages panel.

Honolulu ranks as one of the nation’s worst cities for traffic and retains the distinction of having the highest pedestrian fatality rates for adults 65+. With a rapidly growing older adult population and an expanding multi-modal transportation system, Honolulu is at a pivotal point in our urban development. The Honolulu Walks project is a youth-led initiative that incorporates the unique perspectives of our bookend generations—older adults and youth—to share valuable insights with city planners, policy makers, and community members and promote safe, accessible, and enjoyable streets for all generations.

Presenter: Colby Takeda, Administrator, The Plaza Assisted Living

Improv Crash Course: Saving the World Without A Script (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Improv can do a lot more than just make people laugh. The skills improvisers use to build complex and compelling stories require sharp listening, collaboration, and creativity muscles. Tane Danger a graduate of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs and co-founder of T2P2 will lead this interactive workshop on how creativity, collaboration, and imagination can make you a more effective leader and change agent.

Room: State 2

Presented by The Theater of Public Policy

Walking Advocacy 101- Part 2 (4:00pm-5:30pm)

Thursday, September 14

Walking Advocacy 101 is a two-part mini-course designed for community-level advocates and professionals who are new to the walking movement. We recommend participants plan to attend both sessions, which will include a walkability audit during the mid-afternoon break.

Based on America Walks’ successful Walking College distance-learning program, the curriculum has been designed to nurture the development of the “hard” and “soft” skills that are necessary to become effective change agents. The two 90-minute sessions will include TED-Talk style presentations, facilitated small-group discussion, and a comprehensive toolkit of resources. Click here to learn about Walking Advocacy 101 Part 1. 

Walking Advocacy 101 Part 2 will focus on the “hard” skills. Participants will learn how to evaluate the built environment, design public spaces for people (not cars), master the public policy process, and identify project funding from local, state, federal, and private dollars. They will also study model campaigns, such as “Complete Streets” and “Vision Zero,” and receive mentoring in developing their own campaign outlines.

Click here to learn about Walking Advocacy 101-Part 1. If you want a high-level view of the walking advocacy landscape, so you can then focus on more specific knowledge and skills development, Walking Advocacy 101 is for you. It is recommended that participants plan to attend both sessions.

Room: Governors 1

Presenters: 

  • Mukul Malhotra, Board member, America Walks; Principal and Director of Urban Design, MIG Inc., Berkeley, CA
  • Molly O’Reilly, Board member, America Walks; President, Idaho Pedestrian and Bicycle, Sandpoint, ID
  • Jonathon Stalls, Founder, Walk2Connect, Denver, CO
  • Ian Thomas, State and Local Program Director, America Walks; City Councilmember, Columbia, MO

Download a Copy of the Toolkit Here

Walking Advocacy 101- Part 1 (2:15pm-3:45pm)

Thursday, September 14

Walking Advocacy 101 is a two-part mini-course designed for community-level advocates and professionals who are new to the walking movement. We recommend participants plan to attend both sessions, which will include a walkability audit during the mid-afternoon break.

Based on America Walks’ successful Walking College distance-learning program, the curriculum has been designed to nurture the development of the “hard” and “soft” skills that are necessary to become effective change agents. The two 90-minute sessions will include TED-Talk style presentations, facilitated small-group discussion, and a comprehensive toolkit of resources.

During Walking Advocacy 101-Part 1, participants will learn about the cross-cutting co-benefits of walking and walkable communities and how to research and analyze data to support campaigns. They will also receive training in “soft” skills such as effective communication, building trust, practicing inclusion and equity, leadership development, fostering a local advocacy movement, putting on successful events and programs, and engaging with elected officials.

Click here to learn about Walking Advocacy 101-Part 2. If you want a high-level view of the walking advocacy landscape, so you can then focus on more specific knowledge and skills development, Walking Advocacy 101 is for you. It is recommended that participants plan to attend both sessions.

Room: Governors 1

Presenters: 

  • Mukul Malhotra, Board member, America Walks; Principal and Director of Urban Design, MIG Inc., Berkeley, CA
  • Molly O’Reilly, Board member, America Walks; President, Idaho Pedestrian and Bicycle, Sandpoint, ID
  • Jonathon Stalls, Founder, Walk2Connect, Denver, CO
  • Ian Thomas, State and Local Program Director, America Walks; City Councilmember, Columbia, MO

Download a Copy of the Toolkit Here

Livable Communities Through Public Involvement (8:00am-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This one-day workshop is intended to train professionals to lead Creating Livable Communities through Public Involvement Workshops. Participants will learn how to lead the one-day workshop which is designed to help government-sponsored boards and commissions, advocacy, business, and neighborhood-based groups and individuals work collaboratively to create great communities through public involvement. Participants will learn organizational models and strategies for teaching others how to most effectively work together on pedestrian and bicycle transportation projects and safety programs. The intent is to achieve better outcomes that have community buy-in and support.

As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the “ingredients” of what makes a “livable community.”
  • Identify the type of public involvement groups, their roles and responsibilities, and their relationships to government and other stakeholders.
  • Understand current structures and opportunities for public involvement in order to identify what is missing and what could be improved.
  • Create publicly-supported and trusted policies, programs, and projects.
  • Articulate how 25 people can create positive change.
  • List specific examples of what has worked in other communities.
  • Clearly identify priorities, next steps, and a clear vision of the future.

This training is being led by Toole Design Group.

Located in State 1

 

Funding the Change: Fundraising for Non-Profits (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

The half-day Fundraising Workshop provides an in-depth look at how you can aid your organization’s fundraising efforts.  You will develop the tools and techniques needed when planning and implementing fundraising activities and will learn proven methods to develop a compelling and consistent message, and how to deliver it to increase visibility, supporters, and volunteers.  The ideal attendee is anyone who wants to understand how to raise more money for their cause.  Attendees should prepare by familiarizing themselves with their organization’s mission and programs, as well as current fundraising activities.

This training is being led by Polly Stamatopoulos of the National Disability Rights Network

Located in Kellogg 3

Achieving Walkable Communities with Equity and Inclusion (8:00am-12:00pm)

Wednesday September 13

America Walks and the Every Body Walk! Collaborative are excited to announce an intensive Advancing Community Change Through Equity and Inclusion training at the 2017 National Walking Summit. Participants will engage in hands-on exercises to practice using resources and hear from professionals on how to best use messaging, tools and practices of walkability to promote equity and social justice. The training will include:

  • Information on how to use research-based messages and customize them with local facts and stories
  • Practice developing skills to work with media to get your message out and motivate people to be part of the walking movement
  • Toolkits on how to incorporate themes of equity and social justice within their work and messaging
  • Practice using tools and resource to recognize individual and organizational biases and how to address them
  • First-hand accounts from professionals in the field on how to use these tools effectively and persuasively

This training is being led by America Walks and is located in Governors 4.

Slides and Resources

How to Build Safe Walking Networks (1:00pm-4:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

How to Build a Network of Safe Walking Routes is a 3-hour training session that will convey essential lessons learned from Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s deep forays into select communities to build world-class regional trail systems. Special attention will be given to develop and spotlight the walkability implications of this work.

The session will cover key challenges—planning, organizing, tools and data, funding and marketing—and will include engaging discussions broken out by geographical context (urban, suburban and rural).

This training is being led by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy and located in Governors 1.

Facilitators:

  • Kevin Mills, Senior Vice President of Policy, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
  • Brandi Horton, VP of Communications at Rails-to-Trails
  • Laura Cohen, Western Regional Director at Rails-to-Trails
  • Greg Lindsey, Professor at Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota
  • Patrick Wojahn, Director of Government Affairs at Rails-to-Trails
  • Eric Oberg, Midwest Trail Development Director, Rails-to-Trails

Slides and Resources

Using Data to Advance Walkability (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

We know the environments around us matter and that the places we live, work, learn and play have a large impact on health outcomes. Building and supporting walkable communities for all necessitates collaboration, supportive data, and community support. We invite you to attend this workshop to learn how to use data to advocate for walkable communities. During this interactive workshop, you will learn about the importance of data, focusing on equity with data, collaborating across sectors, and useful data resources, such as the National Equity Atlas and the 2016 Benchmarking Report Website. You will have the opportunity to create and practice messaging around walkable communities with supportive data. Join us to learn how to build, support, and sustain walkable communities through data and collaboration.

This training is being led by Kate Robb of the American Public Health Association (APHA), Ken McLeod of the League of American Bicyclists, and Steven M. Lavrenz, PhD of the Institute of Transportation Engineers.

Located in Governors 2

Slides and Resources

 

 

Safe Routes to School Training (1:00pm-5:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

This engaging, hands-on workshop will help walking advocates understand how a Safe Routes to School program can be a catalyst to create a walkable community. It will cover what Safe Routes to School is, how advocates can start a Safe Routes to School program, and how Safe Routes to School supports other aspects of walking advocacy. Participants can expect to learn the basics about how to structure and sustain a Safe Routes to School program, concrete steps for engaging schools and key community partners, and specific ways to integrate Safe Routes to School and walking into community policies. As part of the workshop, attendees will develop a first step of an action plan and roadmap for engaging local partners and for advancing new and existing Safe Routes to School programs in their community.

This training is being led by Safe Routes to School National Partnership.

Located in Kellogg 1

Placemaking and Design Training (8:00am-12:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

What if we built our communities around places? As both an overarching idea and a hands-on approach for improving a neighborhood, city, or region, Placemaking is a new paradigm of city-building that integrates innovation, creativity, and provides tangible, concrete ways to maximize inclusive and sustainable growth. To quote Rip Rapson of the Kresge Foundation: “It’s more than just enhancing a location. It’s about creating an essence—identifying, elevating, or assembling a collection of visual, cultural, social, and environmental qualities that imbue a location with meaning and significance. “

In this 4-hour session, participants will get a sampling of Project for Public Spaces’ world-renowned Placemaking: Making it Happen training and dive in head first (and hands on) to learn the tools used in creating vibrant places. Participants will learn the basics of transforming a public space, how to use Placemapping (aka the Power of 10) to look at placemaking at multiple scales, how to develop streets that function as places, not just moving vehicles, and how to implement and manage public spaces with a Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper approach.

This training is being led by Gary Toth and Laura Torchio of Project for Public Spaces.

Located in Governors 1

Talking the Walk: Communication Tools for Walking Champions (8:00am-12:00pm)

Wednesday, September 13

We are happy to announce an intensive 3-hour communications training and walk-shop to inspire, compel and engage the public, organization staff, and community leaders.  The training, based on research, experience, and tools developed by the Walk2Connect Cooperative, the Every Body Walk! Collaborative, and other partners, will teach you how to:

  • Use a wide variety of tools and techniques to sharpen organizational and personal communication skills
  • Work with the media to get your message out and motivate people to walk and demand walkable environments
  • Invest in developing staff, community advocates, and volunteers to champion the walking movement

This session will include teaching, discussion, and a 45-minute walk-shop for the lucky few! Training spots are limited, so we ask that you register ahead of time.

This training is being led by Jonathon Stalls of Walk2Connect.

Located in Governors 3

 

Vital and Vibrant Communities Are Engaged and Informed

Please click here to view the program for the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

Vital and vibrant communities make sure that every member has the opportunity and resources needed to be part of the process in creating and planning for safe, accessible and enjoyable walking conditions for all. This path will look at the programs, policies, data sources and tools available to advocates to work to engage and inform government officials, businesses and organizations to promote walking and walkability efforts in their communities. It will examine how when individual advocates or organizations come together, they are more powerful and influential. It will highlight new models of engagement, how technology is changing the conversations and how to plan now for a sustainable future. Participants of this path will leave the Summit equipped to advocate for walkable communities with decision-makers and other community members.

These sessions will:

  • Demonstrate how individual advocates can engage and inform the decision-making process in creating walkable communities for all.
  • Share tools, resources, data, and techniques available to help inform decision-makers on the power of walkability.
  • Provide new information, data and resources that have been developed since the 2015 National Walking Summit that should be shared with the walking movement.

Featured sessions in this path include:

Vital and Vibrant Communities Are Open and Collaborative

Please click here to view the program for the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

Vital and vibrant communities work to bring together partners and community members from a broad range of sectors and backgrounds. These partnerships and the work that they do are open to all community members, all sectors and all backgrounds. Walkable communities are communities where all people come together to create positive change for all members through thoughtful discussions, systemic changes and community participation. They are communities where the people who are effected by change are the change makers. This path will look at how to form collaborations and examples of successful partnerships that bring together all members of a community to create lasting change. This path will grapple with the authentic conversations sometimes needed to create collaboration between very diverse groups and very entrenched systems. Participants of this path will leave the Summit with the tools and information needed to forge new partnerships and engage individuals in sectors outside of the walking movement.

These sessions will:

  • Demonstrate the success and power of creating collaborations and partnerships to achieve goals of the walking movement.
  • Share examples of successful and creative partnerships and collaborations to achieve community objectives,
  • Provide techniques and trainings on ways to engage new partners and develop collaborations.

Featured sessions in this path include:

Vital and Vibrant Communities Are Productive and Thriving

Please click here to view the program for the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

Vital and vibrant communities are places that are continuing to grow and develop physically, socially, sustainably, and economically. This path will look at the power behind walkable communities, focusing on the economic and social benefits that come when walkable communities are available to all members. These economic benefits include those experienced by families, businesses and municipalities. This path will look at the synergy between walkable communities, equitable development, and affordable housing, and examine how walkable communities thrive, produce value and offer opportunities that strengthen and protect communities from the cycles of free markets. Participants of this path will leave the Summit with the data and resources that demonstrate the economic strength and viability of increasing walking and walkability to create and sustain vital and vibrant communities.

These sessions will:

  • Demonstrate the power of walkable communities in creating thriving downtowns, vibrant main streets and dynamic economies of all shape and sizes.
  • Share community, state and national level benefits of the walking movement to economic strength and stability.
  • Demonstrate how walkable communities create new development and opportunities for productivity.
  • Understand the multiple levels and types of economic benefits that safe, walkable places can create

Featured sessions in this path include:

Vital and Vibrant Communities Are Artistic and Innovative

Please click here to view the program for the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

Vital and vibrant communities are places where art and innovation are encouraged and enabled and diverse cultural expression is celebrated. Addressing issues in new and creative ways, while honoring cultural heritage, can help inform and change the built environment, individual behavior and community engagement. The use of art, music, technology and creative problem-solving have all become valuable resources to the walking movement. This path will look at how art and innovation come together to create communities that continue to tackle challenges in new and exciting ways. Participants of this path will leave the Summit equipped with the latest resources and strategies available and be encouraged to develop their own innovative ways to create walkable communities. 

These sessions will:

  • Provide new tools, technology, and techniques that have helped to move the walking movement forward in its success.
  • Share success stories of out-of-the-box thinking, culturally unique ideas, and techniques that have promoted walking and walkable communities.
  • Demonstrate how creativity, art and other place elements can help promote healthy communities.

Featured sessions in this path include:

Vital and Vibrant Communities Are Community Designed and Safe

Please click here to view the program for the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

Vital and vibrant communities are places where functionality is not determined by the number of cars on a street but by the safety, accessibility and opportunities to move for all users. This path will look at the policies, programs and resources that exist to create built environments that reflect the priorities of all users and that take conscious steps to provide environments where all people have access to safe, adequate transportation, affordable housing, enjoyable play opportunities and the infrastructure to support them. We will examine disparities created by unfair resource allocation, existing mechanisms to address them, and how communities who have not enjoyed such benefits are overcoming challenges and creating vital and vibrant places. Participants of this path will leave the Summit with the resources and knowledge about community design and transportation policies and practices needed to make every community a community that is designed for the benefit all users.

These sessions will:

  • Demonstrate programs, policies and techniques available to promote safe, accessible and available active transportation and smart placemaking.
  • Share success stories of projects, programs and/or communities that have worked to assess and change the physical environment to better prioritize community members visions and aspirations for where and how they live.
  • Provide information on the benefits that come from making changes to the built environment to achieve walkability.

Feature sessions in this path include:

Vital and Vibrant Communities Are Healthy For All

Please click here to view the program for the 2017 National Walking Summit. 

Vital and vibrant communities are places where the health of every community member is prioritized and health disparities are actively addressed. This path will look at the policies, programs and resources available to promote environments and activities that encourage physically, mentally and socially healthy behavior for all. This path will also tackle the difficult conversations that come when we are faced with the reality that where an individual lives is a major determinant to the length and quality of life. Participants of this path will leave the Summit with resources and knowledge to help transform communities into healthy, livable spaces for all members by promoting walking as a form of inclusive physical activity and walkable communities as spaces for every community member to be active.

These sessions will:

  • Showcase programs, policies and techniques available to promote healthy communities and physical activity through the promotion of walking and walkability.
  • Share success stories of projects, programs and/or communities that have taken steps to improve physical, mental or social health through walking or walkability.
  • Provide information on a broad range of benefits of walkable communities supported by current research and health indicators.

Featured sessions in this path include:

Ward 8 Walk & Talk (11:30am – 1:30pm)

The CWC is helping to lead the Ward 8 Walk and Talk as apart of the National Walking Summit on Wednesday, Oct. 28th! We will meet at Barry Farms at 11:30am for a brief introduction, walk to St. Elizabeth’s Rise Demonstration Center for discussions and lunch. Please join us for an important conversation about walking as exercise and walkability of Ward 8.

WHEN
WHERE
Barry Farm Recreation Center – 1230 Sumner Road Southeast Washington, DC 20020

Learn more and register here! 

America Walks Walk the Hill Day Briefing Materials

Join leaders and organizers from around the nation to deliver the message that we need safe, accessible communities so that everyone can walk. The Walk the Hill Day, organized by America Walks, will start with an issues and advocacy training, and then participants will Walk the Hill to deliver our message and advocate for specific legislative requests. To prepare you for this exciting day, below find an informational webinar on the current issues on the ground in Washington DC and other resources to get ready to pave the road for a walkable America.

Offices Visited by 2015 Walk the Hill Day Advocates

WTHD Meetings Map_Page_2

Resources

Annual Meeting for the National Physical Activity Society (8am – 11:45am)

Networking, discussion, and presentations on current activities of importance to people working on public health approaches to physical activity. Speakers will address working with local officials and the roles of various sectors in collaborating to create active communities. Open invitation as space allows.

Moderator:  Mark Stoutenberg, PhD, MSPH
Vice President, NPAS
University of Miami Assistant Professor
Program Officer for Exercise Is Medicine

Speakers:

  • Elena Hoffnagle, National League of Cities (featured presentation)
  • Brian Coyle, Nebraska Department of Health & Human Services
  • Christopher Danley, Vitruvian Planning transportation design planning services
  • Hillary Hanson, Flathead City-County Health Department, Montana
  • Suzanne Kelley, Vermont Department of Health

 

American Hiking Society: Hike the National Mall

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Did you know that the National Mall here in Washington, D.C., is a unit of the National Park Service? Join Peter Olsen with the American Hiking Society and a National Park Service ranger for a walk in this urban park and learn about urban hiking initiatives and cultural/historic interpretation. You can even download the free NPS National Mall app for your phone to add an extra dimension of fun.  This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Limited to 25 participants

Led by Peter Olsen, National Park Service ranger, American Hiking Society

Chi Walking: A Mindful Approach to Walking

Friday October 30, 7am – 8am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Basic instruction on how to transform your walking into a mindful practice, focusing on injury-prevention, energy-efficiency, range of motion and core strengthening. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Danny Dreyer, President and co-founder of ChiLiving®, Inc.

Limited to 50 participants

Get ’em Walking; Keep ’em Walking

Friday October 30, 7am – 8am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Discover creative programming ideas to turn people onto walking, and keep them walking, by making it fun and effective.  Learn how to lead walks with participants of various fitness levels and techniques to improve performance. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Presentation and walk led by Michele Stanten, Walking Coach/Fitness Instructor and writer of my walkingcoach.com

Limited to 25 participants

Fundraising on the Move: Crowdfunding for Cash and Community Engagement

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

Crowdfunding is expected to raise over $10 billion in 2015, and is getting a lot of buzz these days. Join ioby to hear how this versatile fundraising tool can help walking advocates increase their funding and grow community engagement. ioby is a national, nonprofit crowdfunding platform designed to support community-led, neighbor-funded projects. Their vision of ‘crowd-resourcing’ makes it relevant to a wide variety of walking advocates from the sectors of public health, community development, philanthropy and more. Through real-life case studies of successfully-funded projects, this session will give attendees a firm understanding of when and how to use crowdfunding effectively.

Presented by Ethany Uttech, Partnerships Manager, ioby (in our back yards)

Presentation:  Fundraising on the Move: Crowdfunding for Cash and Community Engagement

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx (Luncheon Speaker)

Secretary Foxx Official PortraitWe are pleased to be have Secretary Antony Foxx speak at Thursday’s luncheon. We will hear first hand about his commitment to creating safe and accessible walking conditions for every American.

At the Department of Transportation, Secretary Anthony Foxx is working relentlessly to lead the world in building a 21st century infrastructure designed to give businesses and people a competitive economic advantage and a better quality of life.  

As U.S. Secretary of Transportation, Anthony Foxx leads an agency with more than 55,000 employees and a $70 billion budget that oversees air, maritime, and surface transportation.  His primary goal is to ensure that America maintains the safest, most efficient transportation system in the world. Foxx joined the U.S. Department of Transportation after serving as the mayor of Charlotte, North Carolina, from 2009 to 2013.  During that time, he made efficient and innovative transportation investments the centerpiece of Charlotte’s job creation and economic recovery efforts.  Foxx is an attorney and has spent much of his career in private practice.  He received a law degree from New York University’s School of Law as a Root-Tilden Scholar, the University’s prestigious public service scholarship.  He earned a bachelor’s degree in History from Davidson College

USDOT, Federal Highway Administration Resources and Research that Supports Walking

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

FHWA will share information on resources, funding opportunities, and programs and policies that support walking. The session will also engage attendees in a discussion on FHWA’s Strategic Agenda for Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation. Attendees will provide feedback to help FHWA carry out this research.

Moderator: Christopher Douwes, Community Planner, Transportation Alternatives Program / Recreational Trails Program, Federal Highway Administration

Panelists:

  • Shana V Baker, Federal Highway Administration, Office of Human Environment Livability Team Leader
  • Dan Goodman, Federal Highway Administration, Office of Human Environment Livability Team

Presentations

Dealing with Those Bike People

Friday October 30, 9:00 – 10:30am

Randy will share his insights into the role of walking within the evolution of active transportation advocacy.  He’ll explore the tensions and synergies between cycling and walking efforts with a view to what is and will be most effective ways to build power to win change in our multi-modal design and funding decisions.  Scott Bricker will add his perspective and together, Scott and Randy will engage participants in a directed discussion.  You will leave with actionable next steps and some guidance on employing the bike people in your quest.

Moderators:

  • Randy Neufeld, Director of the SRAM Cycling Fund
  • Scott Bricker, Executive Director, America Walks

Nowhere to Go and All Day to Get There (2:15pm – 3:45pm)

Thursday October 29, 2:15pm – 3:45pm

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Join Misty Tripoli, founder of The World GROOVE Movement, for this relaxed, intuitive stroll with nothing to accomplish. Just a yummy combination of mindfulness activities, great conversation and absolutely nowhere to be. Let’s see where the road takes us. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

 

Netwalking® (10:15am – 11:15am)

Thursday October 29, 10:15am – 11:15am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please click on one of the links below to register. 

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your netwalk, you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking®  incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side.
This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Netwalking® 1 – Walk with Vanessa Garrison Vanessa is a national inspirer and leader, co-founder of GirlTrek which is pioneering a health movement for African-American women and girls grounded in civil rights history and principles through walking campaigns, community leadership and health advocacy. Please Click Here to Register

Netwalking® 2 – Walk with Ken Rose Ken is the Acting Branch Chief of the CDC Physical Activity and Health Program Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity. Ken is a long-time leader of connecting public health issues with the built environment. Please Click Here to Register

Each Netwalking® Session is limited to 12 participants

Netwalking® (4pm – 5pm)

Thursday October 29, 4pm – 5pm

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please click on the links below to register.

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your Netwalk®, you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking®  incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side. These activities will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Netwalking® 5 – Chip Johnson Mayor Chip Johnson is serving his third term for the City of Hernando, Mississippi. Chip is a spokesperson for community health and quality of life initiatives around the nation, especially those that can be undertaken by local governments. Chip is a member of the America Walks Board of Directors. Please Click Here to Register

Each Netwalking® Session is limited to 12 participants.

Netwalking® (2:15pm – 3:15pm)

Thursday October 29, 2:15pm – 3:15pm 

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please click on one of the links below to register.

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your netwalk, you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking®  incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side. These activities will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Netwalking® 3 with Dr. Bob Sallis Dr. Sallis  is a family physician and sports medicine expert, who encourages his patients to take charge of their health by exercising. Dr. Sallis, who has a busy practice with Kaiser Permanente in Southern California, prescribes walking as a front line medication to his patients to put them on the path to better health. Please Click Here to Register

Each Netwalking® session is limited to 12 participants

Netwalking® (10:30am – 12pm)

Netwalking®  – organized 60 minute walk featuring leaders and up to 10 participants 

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your Netwalk®, you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking®  incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side.

 

Netwalking (7am – 8am)

Netwalking®  – organized 60 minute walk featuring leaders and up to 10 participants 

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your netwalk® , you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking®  incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side.

 

Every Body Walk! Collaborative Communications Training (1pm – 4:30pm) Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Wednesday October 28th, 1pm – 4:30pm

We are happy to announce an intensive 3-hour communications training on talking about walking in ways that compel and engage the public. The training, based on research and tools developed by the Every Body Walk! Collaborative with the Metropolitan Group, will teach you how to:

  • Use research-based messages and make them your own with local facts and stories
  • Work with the media to get your message out and motivate people to walk and demand walkable environments
  • Continue building the walking movement by training future communicators with a set of tools designed to use the Every Body Walk! Communication messages.

This session will include teaching, discussion, activities and some on-camera practice for a lucky few! Training spots are limited, so we ask that you fill out a short survey on how you will use the training to build the walking movement’s message. This session required pre-registration and is currently full.

Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy (Luncheon Keynote)

vadm-murthy2We are pleased that America’s Doctor, United States Surgeon General Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, will deliver the lunch keynote address on Thursday, October 29th.

Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy was confirmed on December 15, 2014 as the 19th U.S. Surgeon General. As “America’s Doctor,” he is responsible for communicating the best available scientific information to the public regarding ways to improve personal and public health. Dr. Murthy also oversees operations of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, comprised of approximately 6,700 uniformed health officers who serve to promote, protect, and advance the health and safety of our nation and our world.

For the past two decades, Dr. Murthy has devoted himself to improving public health through the lenses of service, clinical care, research, education, and entrepreneurship. The son of immigrants from India, he discovered a love for the art of healing early in his childhood while spending time at his father’s medical clinic in Miami. After earning his Bachelor’s degree from Harvard and his M.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Yale, he completed residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School where he later joined the faculty as an internal medicine physician and instructor. As a clinician-educator, Dr. Murthy has cared for thousands of patients and trained hundreds of residents and medical students.

When he was 17 years old, Dr. Murthy and his sister co-founded VISIONS, an HIV/AIDS education program in India and the U.S, which he led for eight years. He also co-founded the Swasthya project (“health and wellbeing” in Sanskrit), a community health partnership in rural India designed to train women to be health providers and educators. Dr. Murthy also has conducted research on vaccine development and studied the participation of women and minorities in clinical trials. He is a healthcare entrepreneur who launched a successful software technology company, TrialNetworks, to improve research collaboration and enhance the efficiency of clinical trials around the world. Most recently, Dr. Murthy served as the president of Doctors for America, a non-profit organization comprised of more than 16,000 physicians and medical students in all 50 states who work with patients and policymakers to build a high quality, affordable healthcare system for all.

Dr. Murthy firmly believes that our nation’s greatest asset has always been its people. Building a stronger, healthier America is his highest priority as the U.S. Surgeon General.

Misty Tripoli (Evening MC)

MistyHeadshotOn Thursday evening, Misty Tripoli, will MC the After Hours Move & Groove. Misty is one of the world’s most innovative and engaging teachers, choreographers, and mind body connection specialists. She uses her passion and creativity to inspire people to move their bodies in ways they never thought possible. Misty travels the globe teaching and inspiring positive global change through movement, music and truth. With over 25 years of experience, Misty is well-known for her revolutionary and simple approach to dance and fitness that ripen the mind body connection and explode with her passion for self-discovery, creative movement and self-expression.

Misty has been touted as one of the most innovative, controversial and influential instructors of our time. She uses her passion and creativity to inspire people to move their bodies in ways they never thought possible.

 

Ron Sims (Closing Keynote)

50ec3f_2fdd95e1d77a4a87ba194bd780cedf9a.jpg_srz_p_350_414_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srzRon Sims will close the 2015 National Walking Summit with his keynote address, “Bring It Home.” Mr. Sims is a civic volunteer active in health, education, environmental and social equity issues. Appointed by Governor Jay Inslee, Sims serves as the chair of the Washington Health Benefit Exchange Board. The board is responsible for the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Washington State. Mr. Sims also serves on the Board of Regents, the university’s governing body, of Washington State University and the Board of Directors of the Washington Health Alliance, formerly the Puget Sound Health Alliance, a nonprofit organization he helped found where employers, physicians, hospitals, patients, health plan providers and others from throughout the region come together to improve health care quality.

 Sims served as the Deputy Secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development from 2009-2011. He was appointed by President Obama and unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate. As the second most senior official at HUD, Sims managed the day-to-day operations of an agency with 8,500 employees and an operating budget of nearly $40 billion.

Prior to his appointment at HUD, Sims served for 12 years as the elected Executive of Martin Luther King, Jr. County in Washington State, the 13th largest county in the nation with 1.8 million residents and 39 cities including the cities of Seattle, Bellevue and Redmond. As County Executive, Sims was nationally recognized for his work on the integration of environmental, social equity and public health policies that produced groundbreaking work on climate change, health care reform, affordable housing, mass transit, environmental protection, land use, and equity and social justice.

Dr. Robert Bullard (Opening Keynote)

Robert Bullard, the founder of the environmental justice center, talks about some of his projects while in his office on the Clark Atlanta University Campus in Atlanta, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2004. When Bullard formed the center he noticed that the majority groups that rely on the city's public transit system never joined forces to protest the agency's policies. (AP Photo/Ric Feld)Dr. Robert Bullard will open the 2015 National Walking Summit with his keynote address, “Is Walking a Right?” Robert D. Bullard is often described as the father of environmental justice. Professor Bullard received his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. He is the author of eighteen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing, transportation, climate justice, emergency response, smart growth, and regional equity.  He has testified as an expert witness and served as a technical advisor on hundreds of civil rights lawsuits and public hearings over the past three decades. In 1990, he was the first environmental justice scholar to receive the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Conservation Achievement Award in Science for “Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality.”

Dr. Bullard’s works include his book, Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality, which is a standard text in the environmental justice field. His most recent books include Highway Robbery: Transportation Racism and New Routes to Equity, Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities, Environmental Justice, and Regional Equity, and The Black Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century: Race, Power, and the Politics of Place. His latest books include Race, Place and Environmental Justice After Hurricane Katrina: Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, Environmental Health and Racial Equality in the United States: Strategies for Building Just, Sustainable and Livable Communities, and The Wrong Complexion for Protection: How the Government Response to Disaster Endangers African American Communities.

 

Walk the Hill Day Meetings (12:00pm – 5pm)

Wednesday October 28, 12:00pm-5pm

Walk the Hill day continues on Capitol Hill with Congressional meetings. Use the training and resources learned in the morning workshop to deliver our message to Congressional offices.

Led by Heidi Simon, America Walks

Connecting Data and Decisions: Recent Research and Data Sources for Walking Advocacy – Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

Most planners and advocates do not have direct access to peer-reviewed journals that publish research. This session will provide a mini-course for those who want an update on the latest from the scientific community on walking. This event will take place at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health.

Moderator: Tracy Hadden Loh, Ph.D. Research Director, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

Panelists:

  • Charles Matthews, Investigator, National Cancer Institute
  • Heidi Coleman, Chief of Behavioral Research, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Megan Trusdell, Program Assistant, New Jersey Autism Center of Excellence Coordinating Center

Netwalking® (9am – 10am)

Friday October 30, 9am – 10am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required, Please Click One of the Links Below to Register.

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your netwalk® , you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking®  incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side. These activities will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Netwalking® 7 –  Marla Hollander, Marla is the National Partnerships Manager for the Voices for Healthy Kids project at the American Heart Association. Her work and passion includes healthy community design, strategic planning, program development and social marketing. Please Click Here to Register

Netwalking® 8 with Barbara McCann Barbara is the Director, Office of Safety, Energy and Environment at the US Department of Transportation. Barbara oversees the Department’s strategic planning process and sets departmental policy on performance management and program evaluation in the areas of safety, livability and economic development. Barbara authored “Completing Our Streets: The Transition to Safe and Inclusive Transportation Networks” and was the founding Director of the National Complete Streets Coalition. Please Click Here to Register

Each Netwalking® session is limited to 12 participants

Closing Plenary “Bring It Home” by Ron Sims

Friday October 30, 11:00am – 12:15pm

Ron Sims, a civic volunteer active in health, education, environmental and social equity issues, will close the Summit by urging us to take what we’ve learned back to our own communities. Ron’s leadership includes serving as the Deputy Secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development from 2009 to 2011. Prior to his appointment at HUD, Sims served for 12 years as the elected Executive of Martin Luther King, Jr. County in Washington State, the 13th largest county in the nation with 1.8 million residents and 39 cities including the cities of Seattle, Bellevue and Redmond. As County Executive, Sims was nationally recognized for his work on the integration of environmental, social equity and public health policies that produced groundbreaking work on climate change, health care reform, affordable housing, mass transit, environmental protection, land use, and equity and social justice. For more on Mr. Sims, please visit our Keynote Speakers Page.

50ec3f_2fdd95e1d77a4a87ba194bd780cedf9a.jpg_srz_p_350_414_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srzRon Sims is a civic volunteer active in health, education, environmental and social equity issues. Appointed by Governor Jay Inslee, Sims serves as the chair of the Washington Health Benefit Exchange Board. The board is responsible for the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Washington State. Mr. Sims also serves on the Board of Regents, the university’s governing body, of Washington State University and the Board of Directors of the Washington Health Alliance, formerly the Puget Sound Health Alliance, a nonprofit organization he helped found where employers, physicians, hospitals, patients, health plan providers and others from throughout the region come together to improve health care quality.

 Sims served as the Deputy Secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development from 2009-2011. He was appointed by President Obama and unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate. As the second most senior official at HUD, Sims managed the day-to-day operations of an agency with 8,500 employees and an operating budget of nearly $40 billion.

Prior to his appointment at HUD, Sims served for 12 years as the elected Executive of Martin Luther King, Jr. County in Washington State, the 13th largest county in the nation with 1.8 million residents and 39 cities including the cities of Seattle, Bellevue and Redmond. As County Executive, Sims was nationally recognized for his work on the integration of environmental, social equity and public health policies that produced groundbreaking work on climate change, health care reform, affordable housing, mass transit, environmental protection, land use, and equity and social justice.

Getting Fit with Social Media

Friday October 30 9am – 10:30am 

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

This workshop will demonstrate how technology and social media can engage and encourage people to walk and bridge the gap between the real and virtual worlds, leveraging readily available technology on a number of platforms. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Kuti Mack, Master Fitness Trainer and BYBD Wellness Fitness Consultant: Founder of www.BeYourBestDaily.com, Raymond Holmes, Founder and Director of Quintessence Institute, Joseph Brent, Fitiverse Founder, and Michel Edwards, Fitiverse Advisor.

Limited to 30 Participants

 

Walk Listen and Learn with the Walking Classroom

Friday October 30, 9am – 10:30am 

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Participants will be introduced to the award-winning Walking Classroom, a nonprofit  program that improves the physical, mental and academic health of students by getting  them walking, listening and learning during the school day. Participants will then “test-drive” the program themselves and enjoy a 15-minute walk. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Laura Fenn, Creator and Excutive Director of The Walking Classroom

Site Visits, Walking Tours and Safety Audits

Friday October 30, 9:00 – 10:30am

Start with an interactive discussion about easy, fun and effective strategies for raising awareness of challenges facing people who walk and ways they can improve them. We’ll also talk about road safety audits and walking tours. Both can be great ways to develop partnerships, document needs and inspire government agencies to make commitments.   After that, we’ll take a walking tour that enables participants to experience challenges that most people would miss if they were viewing conditions via google maps or windshield surveys. While walking, we’ll identify problems, recommend solutions, and talk about next steps and challenges to moving from recommendations into reality.

This session has a Walk& Talk component, please dress for outdoor activity.

Led by Sally Flocks,  President and CEO, PEDS, and George Branyan, Pedestrian Coordinator, DC Department of Transportation (DDOT)

Is Vision Zero Right for My Community? A Hands on Session to Assess

Friday October 30, 9:00 – 10:30am

Sure, Vision Zero sounds good…but is it the right strategy for my community? Is the timing right? Who should lead the efforts? Join us for a hands-on session to work through these questions and more. Active participation is a must. And we promise to make it worth your while!

Moderator: Leah Shahum, Director, Vision Zero Network

Round Table Facilitators:

  • Robert Ping, Technical Assistance Program Manager, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute
  • Kari Schlosshauer, Pacific Northwest Regional Policy Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership
  • Melody Geraci, Deputy Executive Director, Active Transportation Alliance, Chicago

Foundations and Funders of Walkability

Hundreds of local organizations are working to make communities more walkable and increase walking, however traditionally there has been limited funding to support them. Hear from pioneering funders that investing in community campaigns and strategize on how your campaign could also be funded.

A Walk to the Park: Improving Walkability to and Through Parks

Friday October 30, 9:00 – 10:30am

Safe routes to parks provide more opportunity to engage in physical activity and greater access to open space. Nevertheless, there are several physical and social barriers that often make walking to parks difficult and undesirable, such as proximity to parks, lack of infrastructure, crime and traffic safety concerns. These barriers are a result of engineering, zoning, land use and design trends that have existed for the past 50 years. During this interactive session, leaders from the planning and park professions will share their efforts to work collaboratively to improve the built environment and create more walkable communities.

Moderator: Zarnaaz Bashir, Director, Health Initiatives, National Recreation and Park Association

Panelists: 

  • Alissa Turtletaub, Park Planner III, Miami Dade County Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces
  • Anna Ricklin, AICP, Manager, American Planning Association
  • Scott Ulrich, AICP, CNU-A, LCI, Healthy Places Program Coordinator, Columbus Public Health

Presentations

The Transformational Power of Safe Routes for Seniors

Friday October 30, 9:00 – 10:30am

AARP experts will discuss transportation and mobility issues for aging adults and how to use the new AARP Livability Index. Then take a deeper dive into three California communities that are working on Safe Routes to Seniors programs, effectively making walking conditions safer for older adults through these campaigns.

Moderator and Panelist: Jana Lynott, AICP, Senior Strategic Policy Advisor, AARP Public Policy Institute

Panelists: 

  • Jaime Fearer, AICPPlanning & Policy Manager, California Walks
  • Jim Stone, Executive Director, Circulate San Diego
  • Erisy Watt, Project Director, COAST

Additional Resources

Engaging the Medical Community in the Walking Movement

Friday October 30, 9:00 – 10:30am

How the medical community can get people to reap the health benefits of walking and motivate their patients to get moving.  Featured program initiatives include Walk with a Doc, Physical Activity as a Vital Sign, best practice strategies for reaching practicing clinicians, and a collaborative effort to incorporate lifestyle medicine into standard medical practice.

Moderator: Tom Richards, Director of Corporate Engagement at American Council on Exercise

Panelists:

  • David Sabgir, MD, FACC, Founding CEO of Walk with a Doc, Board Certified Cardiologist, Mount Carmel Health System
  • Dr. Bob Sallis, MD, FACSM, Co-Director, Sports Medicine Fellowship; Clinical Professor of Family Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center; UC Riverside School of Medicine
  • Edward Phillips, MD, Founder and Director, Institute of Lifestyle Medicine in the Department of Physical Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School
  • Dr Jason Matuszak, MD, FAAFP, Chief of Sports Medicine, Excelsior Orthopaedics

Presentations

Safe Routes: Starting with Schools and Inspiring Healthy Communities (Includes Breakfast) – Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Friday October 30, 8am – 10:15am

Pre-registration is required due to limited space. Please click here to register.

This event will be held at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health and includes full breakfast.

Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health
700 2nd St NE
Washington, DC 20002

Learn about the successful programs that increase walking and physical activity among children and families and how to work with schools to encourage these efforts. Limited to 45 participants.

Moderator: Beth Richards, Development and Marketing Director of Safe Routes to School National Partnership

 Panelists

  • Sherie Moore CPD, ALSA, APA, Safe Routes to School and Traffic Safety Coordinator, Clark County School District
  • Brenda Sheridan, National PTA Board of Directors
  • Charlene R. Burgeson, CAE, Executive Director, Let’s Move Active  Schools, Partnership for a Healthier America

 

After Hours Move & Groove (Cities Lounge 9pm-1am)

Thursday October 29, 9:00pm – 1am

Cap off your day with the best way to network – have fun, let off steam, and dance. Get your groove on at the Cities Lounge with combined DJ and Live Music, make lasting bonds and jump around. Featuring Misty Tripoli, one of the World’s most innovative and engaging teachers, choreographers, body Image truth talkers and mind/body specialists. Learn more about Misty on our Keynote Speakers Page.

Evening Program: An Evening of Stories (Cities Lounge 7:30pm – 9pm)

Thursday October 29, 7:30 – 9:00pm

Join us and emcee Misty Tripoli, Creator of the GROOVE Method and Founder of the World GROOVE Movement, at the Cities Lounge for an evening program of stories for leaders from the field. Get inspired, motivated, and energized from engaging and lively advocates who have challenged their communities and succeeded in increasing walking and making America a great place to walk. Learn more about Misty Tripoli on our Keynote Speakers page.

This storytelling event will give you a variety of perspectives on strategies to increase walking in your community. Whether increasing your health, making your community a more inviting place to walk, or even looking at the benefits your community will get with more people walking, the stories are sure to leave you inspired to create change in your own community.

Featured Stories

  • Nicole Ferrara: Personal Stories that Make Change (Executive Director, Walk San Francisco)
  • Christy Kwan: Walking Advocacy Wins (​Programs & Outreach Director, Alliance for Biking and Walking)
  • Michael Schatzki: The No Sweat Couch Potato Recovery Program (​Recovering Couch Potato, Author, MPA)
  • Vanessa Garrision A Fannie Lou in Every Community: How GirlTrek is Activating Black Women to be Changemakers (Co-founder, GirlTrek)
  • Matt Tomasulo: Walk [Your City] (Founder and Chief Civic Instigator, Walk [Your City])
  • Andy Peri: Rockin the Nation- Deb Hubsmith’s Passion and Legacy  (Sustainable Transportation Advocate)

Exploring Walking from a Woman’s Point of View

Thursday October 29, 4pm-5:30pm

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

A conversation addressing women’s concerns about walking and how to take into account the gender differences when planning and designing the pedestrian environment. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Presentation and walk led by Jessica Tunon, founder of Netwalking® and Sharon Bauer, consultant and advocate.

Limited to 15 participants

Turning Grief into Action: Powerful Advocates for Vision Zero

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

Far too many people experience the loss and trauma of traffic violence in our country. Some inspiring members of our community are turning that grief into action through on-the ground advocacy for safe streets. Learn the inspiring stories of their increasingly powerful and successful efforts.

Moderator: Mark Plotz, Program Director, National Center for Bicycling & Walking

Panelists:              

  • Judith Kottick, Founding member, Families for Safe Streets, NYC
  • Amy Cohen, Founding members of Families for Safe Streets, NYC
  • Cathy Tuttle, Executive Director, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

Presentations:

Engaging Diverse Communities Through Advocacy

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

Walkable communities benefit all ages, ethnicities and abilities. Learn about three innovative programs that successfully engaged diverse communities to advocate for walking.

Moderator: Robert Ping, echnical Assistance Program Manager, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute

Panelists

  • Wendy Alfsen, Executive Director, California Walks
  • Joan Cook, Special Projects Manager, Health by Design
  • Gosia Kung, Founder and Executive Director, WalkDenver
  • Zelia Gonzales, Youth Leader, California Walks
  • MariaJose Diaz Ayon, Youth Leader, California Walks

Presentations

Using Innovative Technology Tools to Advocate for Improved Walkway Infrastructure:

Featuring two new and unique GIS tools to assess walkability and the walkway network, promote utilitarian and leisure walking, and support local advocacy efforts.

Moderator: Steve Hooker

Presenters:

  • Ellen Vanderslice, M. Arch., Volunteer, Oregon Walks
  • J. Scott Parker, M. Eng.,  Volunteer, Oregon Walks

  • Chad V. Tucker, B.A., Volunteer, Oregon Walks
  • Bernardita Calinao, PhD, CEO, WALKspan

Creating Age-Friendly Cities: Empowering and Involving Older Adults

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

The session will describe, discuss and brainstorm tested, effective and fun ways to engage seniors in advocating for walking improvements. We will then look at the actions of senior residents in two communities and how they are improving the walkability of their neighborhoods. Leave with tools to recruit and engage seniors into the walking movement.

Moderator: Jeanne Anthony, Sr. Project Manager, Education & Outreach, AARP Livable Communities

Panelists:

  • Ivory Craig, Associate State Director, AARP Mississippi
  • Andrea Bozarth, Associate State Director, AARP Kansas
  • Wendy Landman, Executive Director, WalkBoston

Healing the Nation – Walking and Talking – Solutions and Partners for Safer and Healthier Communities

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

All of us deserve the freedom to walk in our communities– to access basic needs and for benefits including health. Learn how Seattle and Louisville are implementing innovative multi-disciplinary programs across community members, police officers, doctors, patients, and medical staff.  Hear how these multi-sector partnerships are employing a medical center and proven crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) principles to increase safety and build community cohesion.

Moderator: Rosemary Agostini, Founder and Past Chief Activity, Sports and Exercise Medicine, Group Health Cooperative

Panelists:

  • SteVon Edwards, MPH, Community Health Specialist, Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness and America Walks Vice-Chair
  • Officer Robert Cambronero, Community Police Team, South Precinct, Seattle Police Dept.
  • Lieutenant Adrian Z. Diaz, Community Outreach Section, Seattle Police Department
  • Dr. Kim Holland MD, Rainier Clinic, Group Health Cooperative
  • Betty Wills, Medical Assistant, Rainier Clinic, Group Health Cooperative
  • Teri Lindsay, Medical Assistant, Rainier Clinic, Group Health Cooperative

Presentations: 

Technology and Program Solutions to Get People Walking and Keep them Going

Thursday October 29, 4:00 – 5:30pm

Learn about programs that utilize technology to promote walking and connect people in the community and in the workplace. These tools leverage social media, an environment of personal and group challenges, and engage audiences that include city officials.

Moderator: Michele Stanten, Author of Walk Off Weight, MyWalkingCoach.com

Panelists

  • Dan Popovic, Founder of cMEcompete, Community Heath Director – Atlanta BeltLine
  • Robert E. Graham, MD, MPH, ABOIM, FACPDirector of integrative Health and Wellness, NorthShore LIJ Health System

Walking is for Everyone: Ensuring Access for All, Part II (2:15pm – 3:45pm)

Thursday October 29, 2:15pm – 3:45pm

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Come spend some time outside walking and looking at features of the sidewalks and street crossings from a different perspective. Learn through experience how to assess features of the pedestrian environment for accessibility for and usability by older adults and people with disabilities. Small groups will assess sidewalks and intersections for accessibility for people with disabilities using a path of travel checklist, and discuss good and bad features and potential solutions to problems. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Attending the morning session, which can be found here, will be helpful but not essential.

Led By:

  • Tim Gilbert, San Rafael Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee
  • Janet M. Barlow, President, Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, Accessible Design for the Blind
  • Ken Thompson, Veterans Dialogue and Technical Assistance Specialists,  Easter Seals Transportation Group
  • Dennis Cannon, Transportation Accessibility Specialist, Synergy, LLC

Walkabout through Arlington County’s Shirlington Neighborhood – Virginia’s First Gold-Level Walk Friendly Community (2:15pm – 5:15pm)

Thursday October 29, 2:15pm – 5:15pm

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Participate in a walking case study to explore how Arlington County has brought this livable urban village into being and be inspired by replicable examples of groundbreaking pedestrian safety solutions pioneered by local planners and developers. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Lauren Hassel, Outreach and Promotions Manager, WalkArlington, Dennis Leach, Director of Transportation, Arlington County, David Goodman, Bicycle and Pedestrian Program Manager, Arlington County, David Patton, Bicycle and Pedestrian Planner, Arlington County

Limited to 35 people

 

PlayStreets: Repurposing Streets for Play

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

PlayStreets is an initiative that reclaims and redefines public space by temporarily closing streets to auto traffic and creating ‘pop-up play spaces’ for youth and adults. In the same way that Open Streets events advance the walking environment, PlayStreets changes the conversation around what streets should be used for, and who they should primarily serve. By literally letting kids ‘play in the street’, this initiative helps shift the paradigm that defines streets as car-only spaces that are hostile to pedestrians, and allows residents to experience them as valuable public places that can enhance rather than detract from community livability.

In this session, you will learn about: the history of PlayStreets; the recent renaissance of the PlayStreets movement in places including Chicago and Seattle; different models of PlayStreets programs; and lessons learned from practitioners. This session will also include interactive demonstrations of group play activities that are appropriate for a ‘street’ setting.

Join us for this vibrant workshop!

Moderator: Surili Patel, Senior Program Manager, Environmental Health, Center for Public Health Policy , American Public Health Association

Panelists

  • Melody Geraci, Deputy Executive Director, Active Transportation Alliance
  • Seth Geiser, Public Space Specialist, Street Use, City of Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Bryan McCormick, New England Account Manager, Playworks

Presentations

Walkability Success-o-meter: How to Lead, Measure and Fund Community Change (2:15pm – 5:15pm) Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Thursday October 29, 2:15p -5:15p

No pre-registration required; just walk on over!

In this interactive workshop, you will learn and practice how to convene and leverage relationships to gather and unite collaborative partners around a shared vision and shared measures for action and change, including improved health outcomes. Learn about innovative funding strategies and evaluation metrics to keep these projects going. This session will feature case studies including Eat. Play. Live… Better, NJ; LiveWell Colorado Springs; and from advocacy organizations within the Alliance for Biking & Walking.

Moderator: Christy Kwan, Programs & Outreach Director with the Alliance for Biking & Walking and Advocacy Advance

Panelists:

  • Aubrey Day, Strategy CoordinatorLiveWell Colorado Springs
  • Erin Bunger, Senior Research Associate, Center for Research and Evaluation on Education and Human Services (CREEHS),  Montclair State University 

re:Streets: Rethinking Streets to Promote Walking (2:15pm – 5:15pm) Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Thursday October 29, 2:15p – 5:15p

No pre-registration required; just walk on over!

Learn the most innovative approach to street design from cities around the world and how to re-imagine streets so they promote walking, community interaction, play and sustainability. Participate in an interactive design charrette to apply your knowledge to prototypical streets and to bring these skills home. This is a 2.5-hour workshop and will be held at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Mukul Malhotra, Director of Urban Design, MIG

Using Innovative Technology Tools to Advocate for Improved Walkway Infrastructure

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

Featuring two new and unique GIS tools to assess walkability and the walkway network, promote utilitarian and leisure walking, and support local advocacy efforts.

Moderator: Ellen Vanderslice, M. Arch., Volunteer, Oregon Walks

Presenters:

  • J. Scott Parker, M. Eng., Volunteer, Oregon Walks

  • Chad V. Tucker, B.A., Volunteer, Oregon Walks
  • Bernardita Calinao, PhD, CEO, WALKspan

Presentations:

How Pedestrians Can be the Smartest Folks in the Room

Show Me the Money: Finding the Funding for Pedestrian Improvements

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

Highlights creative funding strategies at the state and local levels to find or leverage funding, including how to make your case employing social media and funding techniques.

Moderator: Molly O’Reilly, Board Member, America Walks

Panelists:

  • Wendy Alfsen, Executive Director, California Walks
  • Ellen Zavisca, Transportation Planner, Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization
  • Jill Locantore, Policy and Program Director, Walk Denver

Presentations

Data & Partnerships: Crucial Building Blocks Toward Walkability

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

Solid data and strong partnerships are becoming increasingly important in our work to ensure great places for walking. What have communities done to gather and make the most of data? And how do (sometimes unlikely) partnerships further the cause? Join us with your ideas and questions.

Moderator:  Michelle Teng, MPH, Project Manager Lead, Kaiser Permanente

Panelists: 

  • Elizabeth Thompson, Principal Planner, North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority
  • Eric McAndrew, President and Creative Director, McAndrew Company
  • Stacey Beuttell, Program Director, WalkBoston
  • Krystian Boreyko, Program Coordinator, Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security-Highway Safety Division

Presentations

 

Walking and the Environmental Movement – Joined at the Hip?

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

The environmental movement in America has many shared objectives with walking and walkability advocates. Mode shift away from cars reduces air emissions, and reducing suburban sprawl means both compact communities that are scaled for walkability and less pressure to develop natural landscapes. To build greater collaboration between the environmental and walkability movements, environmental experts working at the intersection of transportation and urban sustainability will engage with conference participants to discuss how our movements can work together. Wendy Landman, Executive Director of WalkBoston (whose work is funded by and focused on climate change, public health and transportation issues) will moderate. Deron Lovaas (NRDC – Natural Resources Defense Council), John Olivieri (US PIRG), and Kevin Mills (Rails to Trails Conservancy) will discuss.

Moderator: Wendy Landman, Executive Director, WalkBoston

Panelists:

  • John Olivieri, 21st Century Transportation, National Campaign Director, United States Public Interest Research Group
  • Kevin Mills, Senior Vice President of Policy and Trail Development, Rails to Trails Conservancy
  • Deron Lovaas, Director, Federal Transportation Policy, Energy & Transportation Program, Natural Resources Defense Council

Collaboration Between State Health and Transportation Departments to Prioritize Walking – Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

State Health and Transportation Departments can work together in a variety of ways to support local communities working to become more walkable.  Strategies include joint technical assistance programs, coordination on complete streets and other policies, and development of state pedestrian plans. Learn about state-level collaboration to prioritize walking, with case studies showcasing two different approaches in Minnesota and Kentucky. This event will take place at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health.

Moderators: Ian Thomas, State and Local Program Director, America Walks and Gary Toth, Senior Director, Transportation Initiatives, Project for Public Spaces

Panelists

  • Shellie Wingate, Healthy Communities Program Coordinator, Kentucky Department for Public Health
  • Amber Dallman, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator, Minnesota Department of Transportation (former Physical Activity Coordinator, Minnesota Department of Health)
  • Jasna Hadzic, Transportation Planner, Minnesota Department of Transportation
  • Cindy Zerger, Planner/Designer, Toole Design Group

Presentation

Collaboration Between State Health and Transportation Departments to Prioritize Walking – Held at Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health

Creating Age-Friendly, Walkable Communities– It isn’t as simple as one Foot in Front of the Other

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

Walking is great for everyone’s health and walking among older adults is especially popular.  In this session you will hear the latest research on how the existing infrastructure in most communities has adverse impacts on the basic mobility of aging adults, and the challenges faced by older adults who want to travel safely by foot. You will also hear about the attitudes and behaviors of older adults concerning walking based on a nationally-representative survey of all adult Americans.  Then hear case studies from Brownsville, Texas and New York City where multiple sectors are working to make the community more walkable, especially for seniors.

Moderator: Chip Johnson, Mayor, Hernando, MS

Panelists:

  • William Milczarski, Ph.D., Department of Urban Policy and Planning, Hunter College –CUNY
  • Peter Tuckel, Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Hunter College – CUNY
  • Arturo Rodriguez, MPH, Director of Public Health, Brownsville, Texas
  • Jesse Mintz-Roth, MUP, Senior Project Manager, New York City Department of Transportation

Presentations

Community-Based Success to Build Equity for Walking

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

Walking success stories of Detroit, Savannah, and Rochester that have overcome obstacles to address health disparities in programs and the built environment to promote walking and improve access to walking for a variety of under-served populations.

Moderator: Liz Thorstensen, Vice President, Trail Development, Rails-to-Trails conservancy

Panelists:

  • Paula Kreissler, Director of Healthy Living and Community Development, Healthy Savannah
  • Virginia Dick, Evaluator, Healthy Savannah
  • Candice A. Lucas, MBA , Director, Community Health Services, URMC Center for Community Health
  • Cindy Gamboa, Project Coordinator, Healthy Environments Partnership
  • Jacquelyn Coats, Educator/Evaluator, Healthy Environments Partnership, University of Michigan School of Public Health

Presentations

Creating Community and Promoting Walking One Step at a Time

Thursday October 29, 2:15 – 3:45pm

This session features three programs to build healthy inclusive communities through programs aimed at removing barriers to walking and connecting people, place and community.

Moderator and Panelist: Lisa Quinn, Executive Director, Feet First

Panelists

  • Allison Hoit Tubbs, Senior Information Specialist, National Center on Health, Physical Activity & Disability (NCHPAD)
  • Amy Rauworth, Director of Policy & Public Affairs, Lakeshore Foundation
  • Rachel Hultin, Community Program Director, Walk2Connect
  • Saoirse Charis-Graves, Founder, Golden Walks

Keynote Address (12:15pm – 1:45pm – Lunch Provided)

Thursday October 29, 12:15 – 1:45pm

We are pleased that America’s Doctor, United States Surgeon General Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, will deliver the keynote speech at Thursday’s lunch. Hear firsthand about his recently release Call to Action on Walking & Walkable Communities and how he is urging America to Step It Up! Dr. Murthy will be followed by Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, who will speak about his commitment to creating safe and accessible walking conditions for every American. Lunch will be provided.

Playing Along the Way

Thursday October 29, 10:15am – 11:45am 

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

A demonstration of ways to provide creative ways for kids to participate in playful behavior while walking to parks, schools and other destinations. This includes a presentation and walking tour. This activity will meet in the hotel lobby and take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Maggie Cooper, City Initiatives Manager, KaBOOM! and Naudy Martinez, Grants Manager, KaBOOM!

Creating Passionate, Confident and Creative Walking Advocates

Thursday October 29, 10:15am – 11:45am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

While on foot, this session will inspire, energize, and inform walking movement champions to use creative and safe approaches to build a growing “base” of future walking advocates and change makers. We will discuss walking trip themes, walking trip leader training, community partner engagement, walking festivals, and social media campaign and networking strategies.  This activity will start in the Redwood room and then will move place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Limited to 40 participants

Led by Jonathon Stalls, Founder Walk2Connect, and Chris Englert, Walking Movement Leader with Walk2Connect and Eat Walk Learn Founder.

Creating Great and Safe Places to Walk: Conducting a Place Audit

Thursday October 29, 10:15am – 11:45am

This session will feature both classroom and outdoor experiences to learn how to conduct a place audit of a street or public place to focus on activities, comfort, image, access and sociability.

This session has a Walk& Talk component, please dress for outdoor activity.

Led by Gary Toth, Senior Director, Transportation Initiatives, Project for Public Places and Kate RubeTransportation Program Manager, Project for Public Places

Presentation

Walking is for Everyone: Ensuring Access for All

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45

Learn how to incorporate design features to meet the needs of everyone in your community, including older adults and people with disabilities.  Expand your knowledge on the needs of users and the basis for good planning and design solutions for enhanced safety and walkability with real-life situations. This session will provide participants an orientation to the way people with disabilities use pedestrian environments including a checklist to assess the path of travel. There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion.  This session will be followed by an afternoon mobile workshop to demonstrate some of the principles discussed

Moderator: Mukul Malhotra, Director of Urban Design, MIG

Panelists:

  • Janet Barlow, President, Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, Accessible Design for the Blind
  • Ken Thompson, Coordinator, Veterans Dialogue and Technical Assistance, Easter Seals Transportation Group
  • Dennis Cannon, Transportation Accessibility Specialist, Synergy, LLC

Presentations

Vision Zero: What is It and Why Does It Matter?

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45am

Everyone is talking about Vision Zero. But what is it, really? And how does it fit into our work to make communities great places for walking? Join us to learn more about the basics and how some are using Vision Zero as a powerful, new tool for change in their communities.

Moderator: Christy Kwan, Programs & Outreach Director, Alliance for Biking & Walking

Panelists: 

  • Leah Shahum, Founder/Director, Vision Zero Network
  • Nicole Ferrara, Executive Director, Walk San Francisco
  • Noel Mickelberry, Executive Director, Oregon Walks
  • Caroline Samponaro, Deputy Director, Transportation Alternatives, Families for Safe Streets

Presentations:

Lessons from the Front Line: How to Bring Resources and Support to the Active Living Movement

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45am

This session will highlight the policy and advocacy approach that Voices for Healthy Kids is supporting and provide examples of winning state and local active places campaigns, highlighting legislative victories, health promotion and infrastructure improvements. We will also provide a snapshot of our nationwide message research project.

Moderator and Presenter: Marla Hollander, MPH, National Partnership Manager, Voices for Healthy Kids

Presenters

  • Isabelle Gerard, MPH, Policy and Opinion Research Manager, Voices for Healthy Kids
  • Beth Richards, Development and Marketing Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership
  • Tim Vaske, Regional Campaign Manager, Voices for Healthy Kids
  • Rachel Callanan, Regional Vice President, American Heart Association

Creative Approaches to Promoting Walking

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45am

A quick look at 10 successful and energetic programs aimed at getting people out and walking across the county, plus “walk’n talk” opportunities with the presenters to learn more about their programs.

Moderator: Jill Chamberlain, Senior Project Manager, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of MN

Panelists:

  • Jill Hamilton Buss, Executive Director, Healthy Central Florida
    Healthy Central Florida – a Tale of Three Cities
  • Karen Bracey, Extension Educator, Penn State Extension
    Everybody Walk Across PA
  • Linda Fondren, Shape Up Mississippi
    Getting People to Walk Now
  • Laura Holloway, Director of Pryor Creek Recreation Center, Pryor Creek Recreation Center
    Walking for Wellness
  • David Mays, Kaiser Permanente Manager Public Relations and Communications
    Nature Is Medicine
  • Leah Moser, Program Coordinator, Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion, Syracuse University
    Move it Monday and the Monday Mile: Jump Start Your Week
  • Gita Rampersad, JD, MHA, Independent Health Equity Consultant
    Innovative PA Activity Models to Promote Health, Community Advocacy, Organizing, and Empowerment
  • Jannie Cox, Managing Member, Meet Me Concepts, LLC,
    ”Meet Me” Social Walking Events for Communities
  • Laura Fenn, Creator and Executive Director, The Walking Classroom
    Walk, Listen and Learn with The Walking Classroom
  • Michel Edwards, Fitiverse Advisor, and Joseph Brent, Fitiverse Founder
    Get Social and Be Fit: Buddying up is the best way to get and stay fit

Presentations

Walkable Communities: Why It’s a Priority for Your Local Elected Officials

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45

This session fosters sharing of innovative strategies that city governments are taking to become partners in the walking movement and allies with advocates in addressing priorities for walking and pedestrian safety.

Moderator: Tracy Wiedt, Program Director, Health and Community Wellness, National League of Cities

Panelists

  • Annapolis Alderwoman Rhonda Pindell Charles
  • Mayor Chip Johnson, Hernando, MS

Presentations

 

Walking and Walkability: Equity, Empowerment and Engage Underserved, diverse communities.

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45am

This session will look at two very different communities (Brownsville, TX and the Greenville neighbor in Bakersfield, CA) to see how they have overcome limited resources and unfamiliar public participation processes to create effective local advocates that are changing their communities. .  We will hear how walking groups, walking school buses and working to get more sidewalks, better parks and safer crosswalks have been accomplished.   These empowered, diverse and underserved communities have a lot to teach us about how to work with them to get pedestrian infrastructure in inaccessible places.

Moderator: Ellen L. Braff-Guajardo, Program Officer, W.K.Kellogg Foundation

Panelists

  • Genoveva Islas, MPH, Program Director, Cultiva La Salud
  • Lourdes Perez, Program Coordinator, Center for Human Services, Ceres Partnership for Healthy Children
  • Yolanda Savage-Narva, Director-Health Equity Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
  • Abraham Kulungara, Director Environmental Health, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
  • Dr. Rose Gowen, City Commissioner, City of Brownsville
  • Arturo Rodriguez, Public Health Director, City of Brownsville

Presentations

Harnessing The Right Whys: How Simple Science and Branding Insights Can Motivate a Lifetime of Walking Among Non-Walkers

Thursday October 29, 10:15 – 11:45am

Leveraging insights from marketing principles and science related to decision making and rewards, this interactive presentation will discuss the reasons and research behind why walking should be branded in more strategic ways to get optimal interest, engagement, and behavioral sustainability.

Moderator: Michelle Segar, PhD, Director, Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy (SHARP) Center, University of Michigan

Opening Session and Keynote “Is Walking a Right?” by Robert Bullard (8:30am – 10am)

Thursday October 29, 8:30am – 10am

Robert D. Bullard, often described as the  father of environmental justice, will kick off the National Walking Summit by exploring the question “Is Walking a Right?” Dr. Bullard’s books include Highway Robbery: Transportation Racism and New Routes to Equity, and Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities, Environmental Justice, and Regional Equity. For more on Dr. Bullard, read his full bio on our Keynote Speakers Page.

Robert Bullard, the founder of the environmental justice center, talks about some of his projects while in his office on the Clark Atlanta University Campus in Atlanta, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2004. When Bullard formed the center he noticed that the majority groups that rely on the city's public transit system never joined forces to protest the agency's policies. (AP Photo/Ric Feld)

Robert D. Bullard is often described as the father of environmental justice. Professor Bullard received his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. He is the author of eighteen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing, transportation, climate justice, emergency response, smart growth, and regional equity.  He has testified as an expert witness and served as a technical advisor on hundreds of civil rights lawsuits and public hearings over the past three decades. In 1990, he was the first environmental justice scholar to receive the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Conservation Achievement Award in Science for “Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality.”

Dr. Bullard’s works include his book, Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality, which is a standard text in the environmental justice field. His most recent books include Highway Robbery: Transportation Racism and New Routes to Equity, Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities, Environmental Justice, and Regional Equity, and The Black Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century: Race, Power, and the Politics of Place. His latest books include Race, Place and Environmental Justice After Hurricane Katrina: Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, Environmental Health and Racial Equality in the United States: Strategies for Building Just, Sustainable and Livable Communities, and The Wrong Complexion for Protection: How the Government Response to Disaster Endangers African American Communities.

Get ‘em Walking; Keep ‘em Walking

Thursday October 29, 7am – 8am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Discover creative programming ideas to turn people onto walking, and keep them walking, by making it fun and effective.  Learn how to lead walks with participants of various fitness levels and techniques to improve performance. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Presentation and walk led by Michele Stanten, Walking Coach/Fitness Instructor/Writer of mywalkingcoach.com

Limited to 25 participants.

Chi Walking: A Mindful Approach to Walking

Thursday October 29, 7am – 8am

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

Basic instruction on how to transform your walking into a mindful practice, focusing on injury-prevention, energy-efficiency, range of motion and core strengthening. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.  

Led by Danny Dreyer, President and co-founder of ChiLiving®, Inc.

Limited to 50 participants.

Netwalking® (8am – 5pm)

Netwalking® is much more than a walk it’s about building meaningful connections. We help make introductions, invite you into casual conversation, encourage random interactions and keep you and your ideas moving.

On your Netwalk®, you will network with a leader in the walking field. Netwalking® helps enhance creativity through exploring new venues and breaking traditional meeting room settings by introducing variety into everyday interactions. As well, walks are led for you to discover beauty around every corner, something you wouldn’t have experienced if you were in an indoor meeting space. Netwalking® incorporates designated breaks encouraging random interaction, and casual conversations, just by walking side by side.

More information can be found at the Netwalking Website Here.

Opening Reception and Poster Session (5pm – 7pm)

Wednesday October 28, 5pm-7pm

Summitteers enjoyed a reception and networking opportunity while exploring posters from the following participants. Click on the link to view the posters!

Walking the Walk – Exploring Walkability on the Met Branch Trail (Walking Workshop 1:30pm – 5pm)

Wednesday October 28, 1:30pm – 5pm

Pre-Registration for this Event is Required. Please Click Here to Register

This workshop will use the Met Branch Trail in Washington, D.C. as a walking laboratory to demonstrate the important role that shared-use paths can play to establish and enhance walkable neighborhoods in urban areas. This activity will take place out-of-doors, so please dress for the weather and for walking.

Led by Kelly Pack, Director Trail Development, Rails to Trails Conservancy, Heather Deutsch, Senior Transportation Planner, Toole Design Group

Limited to 25 participants

Using Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) to Foster Walk-Friendly Communities (3:30pm – 5pm)

Wednesday October 28, 3:30-5pm

Educating, inspiring, and empowering decision makers consider the health impacts of transportation decisions leads to better outcomes for pedestrian proponents. Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is an innovative tool used to examine health effects of initiatives that do not generally consider health consequences. This workshop will present real situations where health and equity goals are being used to help influence land use and transportation decisions that improve environments for walking. Presenters will engage workshop participants in an interactive discussion to identify potential walking projects in your community appropriate for Health Impact Assessment. The discussion will focus on determining practical activities we can do to empower decision makers to consider the health impact of pedestrians on their choices. This session will highlight findings from HIAs about pedestrian access and safety and discuss how HIA can be used to improve local and regional policy and project decisions. (90 Minute Session)

Moderator: Pam Eidson, MEd, PAPHS, Executive Director, National Physical Activity Society

Panelists:

  • Leigh Ann Von Hagen, AICP/PP, Senior Research Specialist, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Pam Eidson, MEd, PAPHS, Executive Director, National Physical Activity Society
  • Susan R. Sutherland, RS, MPH, Public Health Planner, Delaware General Health District (Ohio)

Auditing the Pedestrian Environment: A Tool for Practitioners and Community Members (1:30pm – 3pm)

Wednesday October 28th, 1:30-3pm

Communities are often unsure of which walkability reforms to focus on, how to prioritize investments or what outcomes they can anticipate. Based upon 10 years of research, the Microscale Audit for Pedestrian Streetscape (MAPS) Mini tool assesses the activity-friendliness of streets, sidewalks and crossings, and identifies specific features that are feasible to modify and related to physical activity. This session will: highlight the tool’s development and components; discuss how scores are related to physical activity; and show practitioners how to use the tool to document disparities in streetscape quality and engage community members in assessment as a basis for advocacy.

This session has a Walk& Talk component, please dress for outdoor activity.

Moderator: Chad Spoon, MRPCommunications and Partnership Manager, Active Living Research, University of California, San Diego

Panelist: Jessa Engelberg, Research Assistant/Doctoral Student, University of California, San Diego

 Presentations

Auditing the Pedestrian Environment:  A Tool for Practitioners and Community Members 

Agency and Cross-disciplinary Partner Workshop on Walking and Walkability (12:30pm – 5pm)

Wednesday October 28,  12:30pm – 5pm

Organized by US Department of Transportation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and US Fish and Wildlife Service

Overview of Meeting

This session will bring together Federal, State, and local agencies, practitioners, public health and transportation officials, and stakeholders to develop a shared understanding of major federal initiatives and build multidisciplinary state and local actions to increase walking and walkable communities.

Meeting objectives:

  • Provide an overview of the Federal work occurring to increase walking and improve walkability, with a focus on activities around health and transportation;
  • Identify examples of State and local projects, strategies, successes, issues, and opportunities to increase walking and walkability;
  • Identify cross-disciplinary research needs and opportunities to increase the rate at which organizations are increasing walking and communities becoming more walkable; and
  • Identify strategies and solutions to more effectively align Federal, State, and local efforts to increase walking and walkability.

Workshop Moderator: Scott Bricker, America Walks, Executive Director

Session 1: Walking and Wheeling Safely to Work, School, Transit and Other Destinations

Moderators: Rebecca Higgins; Joanne Waszczak

Panelists: Bob Dallas, Board Chair of PEDS (Pedestrians Educating Drivers on Safety), and MARTA Board Member ; Jonathan Rogers, Transportation Mgmt Specialist, DC Department of Transportation; Keith Benjamin, Street Scale Campaign Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership (Voices 4 Healthy Kids Initiative); Tom Bertulis, Manager of Traffic Engineering Department, Design Consultants Inc.

Session 2: Walking for Health / Livability / Sustainability:

Moderators: Victoria Martinez; Ken Rose

Panelists: John Robert Smith, Transportation for America; Geoff Anderson, Smart Growth America; Barbara McCann, USDOT; Janet Collins, CDC

Session 3: Walking for Access to Recreation

Moderator: Christopher B Douwes, Federal Highway Administration

Panelists: Kevin Kilcullen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Zarnaaz Bashir, Director, Health Initiatives, National Recreation and Park Association

Session 4: Tools for Understanding Walking Needs and Safety

Moderators and Panelists: Tom Schmid CDC; Jeremy Raw USDOT FHWA

Session 5: Data Collection and Research Trends and Gaps

Moderators and Panelists: Daniel Goodman USDOT FHWA; Heidi Coleman USDOT NHSTA

Presentations

Measurement Tools to Promote Walking and Increase Safety (9:30am – 11:30am)

Wednesday October 28, 9:30am – 11:30am

Learn how to promote walking using low- and no-cost tools to measure walkability, and develop a comprehensive pedestrian safety program to promote walking and reduce injury.

Moderator: Tom Schmid, PhD., Team Lead, Physical Activity Translation and Evaluation Team, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

Panelists:

  • Maryanne Bailey, MPH, Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, CPH
  • Keshia Pollack, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy
  • Kathleen Watson, PhD, Epidemiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Chris Kochtitzky, MSP,  Associate Director for Program Development, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention