Category Archives: 2019 Activites

Place-based CPTED for Safe Communities Part 2 (Skills-based CPTED Training)

This workshop will start with a classroom session of the history, background and core learning objectives of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is a proactive technique in which the design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear of and incidents of crime and asocial behavior. This will build on the training held on the first day. On Day 2, participants will break into small groups and travel to a local site to test their knowledge by completing a CPTED assessment in the field. Groups will return to the classroom before the end of the session to give presentations on their findings and have a discussion as a group. Workbook will be provided.

About the Facilitators

  • Faith Kistler is a Police Analyst with the St. Louis County Police Department. As a Police Analyst she identifies and maps crime data, while looking for patterns and trends. She performs analyses, data munging, and data visualization on all forms of police related data. Faith has the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Professional Designation. With this certification Faith has performed several assessments in the St. Louis County region.
  • Brittain (Britt) Storck has established her landscape architectural career around greenway and trail placemaking, natural resource-based recreation projects, and active community design and planning for 15 years. She co-chairs Alta’s National Trail Service Area, leads the firm’s east coast Landscape Architecture practice, and is a national expert on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Britt has worked collaboratively with engineers and planners, urban designers and in a volunteer capacity across the country to develop projects that activate communities and improve the quality of life. She has the CPTED Professional Designation (CPD) credentials obtained through the National Institute of Crime Prevention (NICP) training program. Individuals with this designation are qualified to identify strategies and concepts for projects that effect human behavior and influence a project’s real and perceived safety. CPTED experts perform field assessments and site plan reviews, write CPTED ordinances, author design guidelines, and provide overlay districts for planning and zoning.

 

Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Workshop – Field Visit

This group field visit is a continuation of the Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) workshop from earlier in the morning.  Participants will evaluate a nearby corridor for pedestrian safety and make recommendations for improvement, if needed, based on the knowledge and skilled obtained during the morning session of the workshop.  This workshop will provide an overview of pedestrian crossing safety issues and provide resources for addressing these issues.   Pedestrian treatments that will be discussed include: Rectangular rapid flashing beacons (RRFBs), Leading pedestrian intervals (LPIs), Crosswalk visibility enhancements, Raised crosswalks, Pedestrian crossing/refuge islands, Pedestrian hybrid beacons (PHBs), and Road Diets.

Attendance at the Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) workshop morning session is a pre-requisite for attending this field visit.

Summit attendees interested in also attending the STEP Workshop will need to register for the workshop separately using MoDOT’s Learning Management System, MoDOTU.  Click Here to create a Guest User Account.  If you have already signed up for a MoDOTU account, Click Here to sign in with your username and password.  To find the class in MoDOTU search for “STEP Workshop”.

Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Workshop (8am-12pm)

This Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) workshop is being provided in tandem with the National Walking Summit. This workshop will provide an overview of pedestrian crossing safety issues and provide resources for addressing these issues.   Pedestrian treatments that will be discussed include: Rectangular rapid flashing beacons (RRFBs), Leading pedestrian intervals (LPIs), Crosswalk visibility enhancements, Raised crosswalks, Pedestrian crossing/refuge islands, Pedestrian hybrid beacons (PHBs), and Road Diets.  The workshop includes a group field visit that will take place during the Learning-from-Place Workshops (2:15pm-3:35pm) where participants will evaluate a nearby corridor for pedestrian safety and make recommendations for improvement if needed.

Summit attendees interested in also attending the STEP Workshop will need to register for the workshop separately using MoDOT’s Learning Management System, MoDOTU.  Click Here to create a Guest User Account.  If you have already signed up for a MoDOTU account, Click Here to sign in with your username and password.  To find the class in MoDOTU search for “STEP Workshop”.

Evening Reception “A Taste of St. Louis” (5p-7p)

Join America Walks and local partners for an evening reception welcoming attendees to St. Louis with small bites and tastes from some local eateries.

Featured Guests

In April 2017, Lyda Krewson won a historic election to become the first woman to serve as mayor of St. Louis. Prior to the election, Krewson served as 28th Ward Alderwoman. She is also a CPA and served as the CFO for an international design firm until her election as Mayor in 2017.

As Mayor, Krewson has focused intently on public safety, naming Judge Jimmie Edwards as Director of Public Safety and John Hayden as Chief of Police. She also led the effort to pass Proposition P, a half cent sales tax to provide salary and benefit increases for police and firefighters, and a million each for summer jobs, recreation for kids, mental health, and demolition. Krewson is also focused on reducing vacant buildings, cleaning up St. Louis, increasing economic and workforce development, and providing good service to all St. Louis residents, businesses and visitors.

Krewson is known for her civility, determination and fairness in addressing issues.

During her tenure as 28th Ward Alderwoman, Krewson unapologetically took on tough and controversial issues including passing the comprehensive smoking ban, fighting for common sense gun regulation, leading the effort to reduce the Board of Aldermen from 28 to 14, and passing the city’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.  Krewson worked closely with Forest Park Forever to renovate Forest Park, and with developers to bring responsible development to the Central West End, Skinker DeBaliviere, and the Loop. She is also known for making neighborhoods more accessible for walkers and bike riders, planting over 1,500 trees, sponsoring the “doggie dining” bill, and spearheading the Sunflower + Program.

After graduating with an education degree from Truman State University, Krewson moved to St. Louis where she earned her accounting degree from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Later she worked for Deloitte for 7 years.

In 1995 Lyda’s husband, architect Jeff Krewson, was tragically murdered in an attempted carjacking in front of their home. With the support of family, friends, and many great neighbors, Krewson raised her two kids and continued to live in her home in the Central West End. In 1998, she married Mike Owens. Today, they enjoy neighborhood walks, gardening, and occasional hikes in the mountains.

 

Place-based CPTED for Safe Communities Part 1 (Skills-based CPTED Training)

This workshop will start with a classroom session of the history, background and core learning objectives of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is a proactive technique in which the design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear of and incidents of crime and asocial behavior. Day 1 will be a classroom session to introduce participants to CPTED principles, public education techniques, and programmatic and operational measures for improving public space. Participants will learn how to perform a CPTED assessment.

About the Facilitators

  • Faith Kistler is a Police Analyst with the St. Louis County Police Department. As a Police Analyst she identifies and maps crime data, while looking for patterns and trends. She performs analyses, data munging, and data visualization on all forms of police related data. Faith has the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Professional Designation. With this certification Faith has performed several assessments in the St. Louis County region.
  • Brittain (Britt) Storck has established her landscape architectural career around greenway and trail placemaking, natural resource-based recreation projects, and active community design and planning for 15 years. She co-chairs Alta’s National Trail Service Area, leads the firm’s east coast Landscape Architecture practice, and is a national expert on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Britt has worked collaboratively with engineers and planners, urban designers and in a volunteer capacity across the country to develop projects that activate communities and improve the quality of life. She has the CPTED Professional Designation (CPD) credentials obtained through the National Institute of Crime Prevention (NICP) training program. Individuals with this designation are qualified to identify strategies and concepts for projects that effect human behavior and influence a project’s real and perceived safety. CPTED experts perform field assessments and site plan reviews, write CPTED ordinances, author design guidelines, and provide overlay districts for planning and zoning.

 

ADA Transition Plans: Making Communities Accessible for All

An ADA Transition Plan is a legally-binding commitment by a local or state government entity to make specific accessibility improvements in the public space within a specific time frame. This panel discussion will start with the history of Missouri’s Statewide ADA Transition Plan, present up-to-date information on the implementation of that plan and others, and provide you with the knowledge to initiate or advance this effective legal strategy in your own community.

Learning Objectives:

After this panel discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Explain, in general terms, what is meant by an “ADA Transition Plan”
  • Describe typical processes through which ADA Transition Plans are developed and implemented by state and local government entities
  • Give specific examples of accessibility improvements that have been completed or are planned by MoDOT and the City of St. Louis as part of their ADA Transition Plans
  • Discuss ways for advocates to engage with state and local government entities to assist with the development or implementation of ADA Transition Plans

About the Panel

  • Kim Lackey (Paraquad): Kim Lackey is the Senior Director of Public Policy and Independent Living at Paraquad Inc., a Center for Independent Living in St. Louis. At Paraquad, Kim is part of the leadership team that helps drive Paraquad’s mission. She guides and directs a team of individuals working to influence public policy, empower individuals with disabilities to live independently, and create change that improves the lives of individuals with disabilities. She attended the University of Missouri-Columbia and received a B.S. in History and Political Science. Kim graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, School of Law in May 2006 with her J.D. She has worked on improving access to employment, health care, public transportation and affordable accessible housing for individuals with disabilities for more than 12 years.
  • Tom Evers, PE: St. Louis Assistant District Engineer, Missouri Department of Transportation: Tom Evers is a graduate of the University of Missouri – Rolla, with a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering in December 1998. He became a Professional Engineer in the State of Missouri in 2007. In his 21 years with the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT), he’s held positions in Construction in North St. Louis County, and was a Transportation Project Manager in the St. Louis Area, overseeing the WB Blanchette Bridge rehabilitation project.
    In 2011 he became Area Engineer for MoDOT in St. Charles County. Currently, Tom is the St. Louis Assistant District Engineer, managing an internal program delivery staff of 200 employees and delivering nearly $300 million worth of projects. He lives in Maryland Heights with his wife and four children.
  • Julie Stotlemeyer (MoDOT, Central Office):Julie Stotlemeyer, Missouri Department of Transportation, Assistant State Design Engineer Julie oversees several areas within the Design Division at MoDOT, one of which is the Americans with Disabilities Act as it relates to design policy and projects. Part of those duties are oversight of the department’s ADA transition plan and implementation. She has 27 years of experience with developing highway projects and operating the highway system. Julie is a graduate of the University of Missouri at Rolla with a BS in Civil Engineering and a licensed professional engineer in the state of Missouri.
  • David Newburger (City of St. Louis): David Newburger is Commissioner on the Disabled for the City of St. Louis and is a co-Founder of the Starkloff Disability Institute. He works toward the fundamental goal of making it possible for individuals with disabilities to be full and active participants in the community. As Commissioner, he is Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator for the City, helping the City comply with disabilities rights laws.He has also played a leading role in helping design major civic venues, such as, the Gateway Arch National Park, the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum in St. Louis, and the St. Louis Cardinals baseball stadium, to seamlessly welcome individuals with the wide variety of disabilities.Mr. Newburger has been an advocate for including people with disabilities in many capacities and over many years. He has an A.B from Oberlin College and J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. He has taught law both at the Washington University School of Law and the Saint Louis University School of Law.
    Mr. Newburger is widowed with one married daughter and two grandchildren. He had polio as an infant and has mobility and related disabilities.

The Ten Toe Express Explores Wash U’s Connection to Transit

The Ten Toe Express is a program created by Citizens for Modern Transit in partnership with AARP St. Louis, designed to teach active older adults how to navigate the transit system while incorporating healthy habits like walking, healthy eating, and social interaction.  This Learning from Place workshop will provide an overview of the Ten Toe Express program and a special guided tour of Washington University and its connections to transit.

Walkers will first explore the Active Commuter Hub with special guest walk leader Clara Steyer, then participants will hop on the East bound Blue line to explore the Central West End MetroLink Station.  This station is the busiest station on the MetroLink alignment and is currently undergoing construction and will serve as  future model for other stations regarding safety, security, and access control.  The final stop will be the Cortex MetroLink station.  Walkers will learn about Washington University’s connection to this station, along with CMT’s role in bringing the station to fruition.  Afterwards, participants will ride back to the Skinker MetroLink station to resume summit activities.

Advanced Campaign Planning and Implementation (Skills-based Advocacy Training – Part 2)

Take your advocacy to the next level with this workshop. Topics covered will include issue research, coalition development, messaging for the public and elected officials, and using data to support your policy goals – all in the context of actual ongoing campaigns in the St. Louis area and statewide.

After the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain, in general terms, how advocates can impact public policy
  • Describe and discuss actual ongoing advocacy campaigns in the St. Louis area and statewide
  • Conduct advocacy campaign tasks, such as
    • Research an issue
    • Identify specific policy goals
    • Assemble a community coalition
    • Design/disseminate a messaging campaign
    • Meet with elected officials
    • Analyze/utilize data
  • Pick up the phone and discuss strategy/challenges with other advocates

Facilitators:

  • Taylor March (Trailnet): directs Trailnet’s walking, biking, and transit advocacy campaigns, policy work, and educational campaigns. Taylor’s work centers on the framework that infrastructure solutions are the most effective way to eliminate traffic fatalities on our streets, and having a plan for where infrastructure changes are needed is essential for St. Louis. Taylor is a League-Certified Cycling Instructor, has worked with car-free commuting initiatives and education campaigns that target infrastructure planning and community outreach. His past work with Trailnet’s Safe Routes to School Program leveraged parental and community involvement to promote and support physical activity. Before joining Trailnet, Taylor worked as a photovoltaic solar designer and project manager, and his passion for engineering, infrastructure, and the environment inform his work on public policy at Trailnet. Taylor is a full time bicycling, bus transit, and walking commuter and a League-Certified Cycling Instructor. Taylor has years of previous experience as the service manager at bicycle shops, teaching weekly mechanics clinics, as well as well as holding certifications in bicycle frame building and design through the United Bicycle Institute in Ashland, Oregon.
  • Faye Paige Edwards (GirlTrek): Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification.
    She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.
  • Kim Cella (Citizens for Modern Transit)
  • Ian Thomas (America Walks): Ian Thomas is the State and Local Program Director with America Walks. In this role, he develops and delivers education programs for advocates, professionals, and elected officials, about the benefits of walkable communities and strategies to create them.
    From 2000 until 2013, Ian served as the founding Executive Director of the PedNet Coalition of Columbia, MO. During this time, he developed one of the largest Walking School Bus programs in the country, coordinated a campaign that led to Columbia adopting the first “complete streets’ policy in Missouri, and was instrumental in reducing neighborhood speed limits.
    In 2013 and again in 2016 and 2019, Ian won election to the Columbia City Council, where he continues to advance healthy and walkable community policies. He is a member of Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council.

Note: This is a stand-alone workshop for Summit participants who already understand advocacy basics and wish to engage more deeply in actual campaigns, going forward. It is also the second of a two-part series for those are new to advocacy – Part 1 is on Tues., 2:15 – 3:45 pm.

The Basics of Advocacy for Community Change (Skills-based Advocacy Training – Part 1)

Sign up for this training if you’re new to advocacy and you want to raise a community issue and provide input to decision-makers. Through presentations, small-group discussions, and role-play activities, you will learn how to cultivate a civic voice and impact public policy, regulations, and laws.

After this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain, in general terms, what is meant by “advocacy”
  • Describe how advocates can influence values/culture leading to community change
  • Discuss the range of activities involved in advocacy, from simply showing up at a rally to understanding the policy levers that trigger a change in the law
  • Summarize components of a public policy advocacy campaign such as research, goal-setting, coalition-building, messaging, meeting with decision-makers, and utilizing data
  • Prepare arguments and counter-arguments for and against particular public policy proposals
  • Give examples of advocacy in other settings such as organizations and social groups

Facilitators:

  • Aimee Wehmeier (Paraquad): Aimee Wehmeier grew up in St. Charles, MO with a belief she could change the world. While attending the University of Missouri, she found a shared sense of culture and empowerment and, for the for the first time, didn’t feel ashamed of her disability. After advocating at the state level about her personal experiences, she realized the power of her voice. Currently Aimee is the President of Paraquad, one of the first grass roots advocacy Centers for Independent Living in the United States. To this day, Aimee believes that by working together and standing up for what you believe in, we can create meaningful policy change and make the world a better place.
  • Jacque Knight and Joanne Martin (CBB Transportation Engineers + Planners):Joanne is dedicated to creating innovative, long-lasting solutions to challenges facing the community’s transportation system for all modes of transportation. She first started developing her passion for transportation as an undergraduate student at Saint Louis University. Through her employment with transportation agencies in both the public and private sector, she has been able to cultivate a deeper understanding of the transportation industry from varying perspectives. Joanne has contributed to projects focusing on a wide variety of transportation network. Some of the projects in her career include Tower Grove East Neighborhood Study focused on improving walkability, Zumbehl Corridor Study focused on maintaining vehicular and pedestrian safety as traffic volumes grow, and I-270 North Design-Build project focused on improving mobility and safety for vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders in St. Louis North County.
  • Ian Thomas (America Walks):Ian Thomas is a veteran of the walkable communities movement. He served on the America Walks Board of Directors for seven years, until his appointment as our State and Local Program Director in September, 2014.
    In 2000, he co-founded the PedNet Coalition of Columbia MO, and led the organization as its Executive Director for 13 years. Among several accomplishments, he coordinated the campaign to pass Columbia’s Complete Streets policy in 2004 – one of the earliest such policies in the U.S. In 2013, Ian was elected to the Columbia City Council, where he launched several new initiatives to expand healthy community policies, including an effort to expand the city’s bus system. He is a member of Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council.
    Ian and his wife, Ellen, a pediatrician, live in Columbia.

Note: This is a stand-alone workshop for Summit participants who are new to advocacy and who want to understand the basics. It is also the first of a two-part series for those who wish to engage more deeply in actual advocacy campaigns, going forward – Part 2 is on Weds., 10:45 am – 12:15 pm.

Closing Ceremony (12:30pm-1:00pm)

Featuring the Saint Louis Story Stitchers:

The Saint Louis Story Stitchers Artists Collective is a non-profit organization engaged in urban storytelling. The mission of Saint Louis Story Stitchers is to document St. Louis through art and word to promote understanding, civic pride, intergenerational relationships and literacy.

Collective artists work alongside twenty 16-24-year-old urban youth to collect stories, reframe and retell them using the arts to promote a better educated, more peaceful and caring society. Saint Louis Story Stitchers are a resident organization at Kranzberg Arts Foundation where members rehearse, present and perform in the Foundation’s first-class spaces. The Collective also maintains the Stitchers Storefront Studio in the historic Loop District for recording, editing and publishing. Current projects focus on public health issues including gun violence.

Morning Keynote (8am-9am): Writing the Next Chapter

After an afternoon of exploring the local area and hearing from inspiring panelists, this keynote session will challenge attendees to think about how their experience at the National Walking Summit-St. Louis can help make the St. Louis community (and all attendees’ communities) more walkable in the years to come. Attendees will hear from a panel of thought leaders on the opportunities they see to overcome barriers and build a future where every neighborhood can be navigated safely, comfortably and joyfully on foot, including an overview of inspiring pedestrian projects that are in process in St. Louis right now.

About the Moderator

Kea Wilson has more than ten years experience as a writer telling emotional, urgent and actionable stories that motivate average Americans to get involved in making their cities better places. She is also a novelist, cyclist, and affordable housing advocate. She lives in St. Louis, MO, and can be reached at kea@streetsblog.org.

 



About the Panel

Jacque Knight is a Transportation Planner with CBB. Jacque has a passion for promoting transportation systems that put people first and create walkable, vibrant and healthy communities. She works to support a better quality of life through projects that enhance active transportation and increase access to opportunity. She is a transportation planner at CBB Transportation. Recent and current projects include St. Louis County Action Plan for Walking and Biking, Bevo Great Streets, Collinsville Great Streets, and the Downtown St. Louis Multimodal Plan. Jacque serves as the chair for the Community Mobility Committee, an advisory committee for the City of St. Louis on items related to walking, biking, and micromobility issues. Jacque has a Master of Urban Planning, a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies, all from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS.

Grace Kyung works at Urban Strategies, Inc. as a catalyst in changing how to plan for communities by applying a health and racial equity lens to develop healthy communities. To do this in a just way, she works alongside community members to recognize historical circumstances and the current conditions necessary to achieve equity. Grace is developing the Downtown East St. Louis Transformation Plan that’ll focus on housing, neighborhood, and people strategies to ensure all families are stable and thriving. Grace has received recognition and awards from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Missouri State APA, Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, and the Transportation Research Board. She is also a core-organizer with the Untokening, which is comprised of advocates from diverse social and racial backgrounds who work in professional and personal capacities to advance equity in mobility and community development.

Scott Ogilvie works in the Planning and Urban Design Agency for the City of St. Louis. Prior to that he served on the St. Louis Board of Aldermen for eight years. While being a champion for active transportation, he passed a number of pieces of legislation to improve the city’s non-motorized transportation amenities and policy. He also helped guide a number complete streets, traffic calming, and trail projects to completion. Outside of the transportation realm, he passed legislation limiting campaign donations in local elections, and participated in reform to the City’s tax incentive process. One of his proudest achievements was shepherding through the funding to resurface the badly deteriorated Penrose Park Velodrome, which reopened in 2019.

The Cortex District

The Cortex District is a rapidly growing mixed use office community and technology hub that grew from a former heavy industrial area in mid-town St. Louis. See how both new and repurposed buildings have been knit together under a comprehensive master planning process that includes a new light rail station and multi-use trail, and extensive new pedestrian infrastructure and active public space. While much has already been completed, ongoing planning will help connect the District to adjacent neighborhoods and bridge existing gaps in infrastructure. Cortex is a 10 minute light-rail trip from the front of Washington University.

About the Facilitator: Scott Ogilvie works in the Planning and Urban Design Agency for the City of St. Louis. Prior to that he served on the St. Louis Board of Aldermen for eight years. While being a champion for active transportation, he passed a number of pieces of legislation to improve the city’s non-motorized transportation amenities and policy. He also helped guide a number complete streets, traffic calming, and trail projects to completion. He partnered with Trailnet in stopping St. Louis County’s South County Connector Highway project. Outside of the transportation realm, he passed legislation limiting campaign donations in local elections, and participated in reform to the City’s tax incentive process. One of his proudest achievements was shepherding through the funding to resurface the badly deteriorated Penrose Park Velodrome, which reopened in 2019.

Great Rivers Greenway St. Vincent Greenway walking tour with Girl Trek: Washington University to St. Vincent Greenway

Join us for a 4 mile round trip tour (via both transit and walking) and learn about GirlTrek’s best practices for a fun, inclusive and safe walk. This tour starts and ends at the Brown School of Social Work. We will ride one stop on the Skinker metrolink to St Vincent Greenway, then walk approximately one mile before turning around. The terrain is flat.

About the Faclitators

  • Deidre Brown has a passion for helping people be their best both academically and  physically.  She is a 2016 American Walks Walking College Fellow, a Trailnet Walk/Bike Ambassador, and has been a GirlTrek organizer since 2012.  Deidre promotes living an active lifestyle and acts as an advocate for making communities more livable and accessible for all.
    Additionally she is a founding member and President of the Riverview Gardens School District’s Foundation. She is an alumna and founding member and Treasurer of the Riverview Gardens High School Alumni Association.  She holds several degrees – a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science, a Graduate Certificate and Master of Science in System Engineering and a Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity. Deidre has been employed with Boeing for 20 years.
  • Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification.
    She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country  — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.
  • Sheryll Williams is Outreach Coordinator at Great Rivers Greenway. Great Rivers Greenway is developing a dynamic network of greenways that connect us to our rivers, parks and communities, and strengthen the social, economic and environmental well-being of the St. Louis region. Sheryll empowers people to explore how they can incorporate the greenways to ‘live life outside’ and enjoy nature.
    She will lead the walk on St. Vincent Greenway from campus via Metrolink to a neighborhood that has been transformed by the greenway. Participants will observe how the greenway meets varied transportation needs and connects people to nature.

Great Rivers Greenway Centennial Greenway Walking Tour with Girl Trek: Washington University to Delmar and Ackert Walkway

Join us for a 2.32 mile round trip tour on the Centennial Greenway and learn about GirlTrek’s best practices for a fun, inclusive and safe walk. This tour starts and ends at the Brown School of Social Work on the Washington University campus. We’ll follow the greenway across the campus, through the historic, tree-lined Parkview neighborhood to Delmar Loop / Ackert Walkway. The terrain is flat.

About the Facilitators

  • Deidre Brown has a passion for helping people be their best both academically and  physically.  She is a 2016 American Walks Walking College Fellow, a Trailnet Walk/Bike Ambassador, and has been a GirlTrek organizer since 2012.  Deidre promotes living an active lifestyle and acts as an advocate for making communities more livable and accessible for all.
    Additionally she is a founding member and President of the Riverview Gardens School District’s Foundation. She is an alumna and founding member and Treasurer of the Riverview Gardens High School Alumni Association.  She holds several degrees – a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science, a Graduate Certificate and Master of Science in System Engineering and a Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity. Deidre has been employed with Boeing for 20 years.
  • Faye Paige Edwards is a community activist who has many roles. She is the Marketing Manager for AfricanAncestry.com, whose mission is to change the way African Americans seem themselves and Africa. She has been a Walking College Fellow and is now a mentor for America Walks. She also holds an BA, MA, MBA, Community Health Worker certification and NCBH Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor certification.
    She has been an Organizer for GirlTrek — now the largest behavioral health movement for African American women in the country  — since 2012 and is now on the GirlTrek National Advisory Council. She continues to grow the St Louis Metro GirlTrek Tteam, now more than 2,000 women committed to a daily 30 minute walk as radical act of self-care.
  • Sheryll Williams is Outreach Coordinator at Great Rivers Greenway, the public agency that is building a network of greenways to connect the region. Sheryll is an avid walker, public transit user and bicycle & pedestrian advocate. She promotes the benefits and raises awareness of the greenways at businesses, health fairs, expos, schools and festivals.
    She will lead the walk on the Centennial Greenway through campus to a nearby retail and residential community. Participants will experience how the greenway connects the communities and neighborhoods, provides transportation choices, promotes good health and improves economic vitality.

Experience Forest Park Though Its Network of Recreational Trails

This tour will highlight historic and contemporary aspects of one of the countries great urban parks. This casual walk will explore about 2.5 miles through the Park and view regional cultural attractions, sports facilities, recreational destinations and structures originally created for the 1904 World’s Fair.

About the Facilitator

John O’Gorman leads the ambitious fundraising operations for Forest Park Forever. Since joining Forest Park Forever in January 2012, O’Gorman has overseen the growth of the conservancy’s annual fundraising from $2.2 million to more than $3.2 million, as well as the successful completion of a $130 million capital and endowment campaign, the most ambitious in Forest Park history.

Prior to this role, O’Gorman was an executive with a national fundraising consultant firm. He served as counsel to civic, cultural, educational, healthcare and religious organizations throughout the Midwest and East Coast, managing transformational campaigns that raised more than $600 million for the firm’s clients.

O’Gorman is a member of the St. Louis Chapter of the Association for Fundraising Professionals and has served on its Programming board.

The Ville: Can Community-Based Tourism Revive Public Space in a Historic Black Community?

The Ville is a historic African-American community located in the heart of North St. Louis with a complicated history of triumph from forced segregation of the black community and deterioration from desegregation and divestment of The City of St. Louis. Despite its current distress, The Ville continues to house landmarks that memorialize an amazing story of perserverence and nuture community resilience that has recently led to initiatives that have inspired hopes of reinvigoration. Of those new initiatives, 4theVille, a cross-generational organization started by lifetime residents and young professional community activists, has begun to reclaim and leverage the history of the neighborhood as a galvanizer and catalyst for tourism and economic development. Join Aaron Williams from 4theVille and University of Minnesota Tourism Center Director Cynthia Messer for a tour of The Historic Ville and an introduction to community-based tourism planning.

A National Park Designed for Everyone

Recent renovations of the Gateway Arch National Park grounds increased accessibility for all visitors. This workshop will highlight those changes while exploring this unique landmark.

About the Faclitator:

Lonny Boring, Senior Project Manager, Great Rivers Greenway District: Lonny Boring is Senior Project Manager for Great Rivers Greenway, the St. Louis region’s park and trail agency. Since 2008, he has managed more than $150 million in greenway and infrastructure improvement projects.   He served as Great Rivers Greenway’s lead project manager for the public-private CityArchRiver partnership. This transformational project delivered major improvements to the Gateway Arch National Park including renovations to the historic landscape and expanded museum.   It also included the complete redesign and reconstruction of Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis.  He is currently working to complete the connection between the River des Peres Greenway and Gravois Greenway: Grant’s Trail.  Lonny earned a bachelor’s degree from Missouri University of Science & Technology and a master’s degree from the Nicholas School for the Environment at Duke University.

 

Show Me the Money

You can’t put a price tag on a good walk, but you can find ways to fund the instrastructure and programs that promote walkability. Learn strategies to employ existing funding sources to make your idea a reality.

About the Panel

Greg Harris has been Executive Director of Missouri Rock Island Trail since July 2015. The non-profit coalition of communities, businesses and individuals seeks to preserve the 191 mile former Rock Island Railroad corridor as a recreational trail. The first 47 miles opened in December, 2016 as part of Katy Trail State Park and the next 144 miles is being rail-banked.

Greg had retired from Missouri University of Science & Technology in Rolla, MO as Executive Director of Development after 17 years, working to secure major gifts and planned gifts. Before that, he was Campaign Director for United Way of the Ozarks in Springfield 10 years. He has worked at Walt’s Bike Shop in Columbia, MO, managed Sunshine Cycles in Springfield, MO and Coventry Cycles in Wichita, KS. Greg was a sales rep for Trek in its early years.

In the 1980’s, Greg was honored to volunteer with the late Darwin Hindman to secure endorsements in Springfield, MO for the Katy Trail. That led to serving on the Springfield-Greene County Park Board where Greg successfully proposed they preserve what is now the 35 mile Frisco High Line Trail to Bolivar, MO. That led to co-founding Ozark Greenways. He served a decade on the Trails Advisory Board for Missouri State Parks that awards $1.5 million per year for trails. Greg grew up in car-centric suburban St. Louis and enjoys walking or bicycling most days from his home in Rolla.

Where Can We Go From Here?

Walking is great but can only get you so far. By opening transit doors, communities can open doors to any number of opportunities for school, work, and play.

About the Panel

  • Jacque Knight is a Transportation Planner with CBB. Jacque has a passion for promoting transportation systems that put people first and create walkable, vibrant and healthy communities. She works to support a better quality of life through projects that enhance active transportation and increase access to opportunity. She is a transportation planner at CBB Transportation. Recent and current projects include St. Louis County Action Plan for Walking and Biking, Bevo Great Streets, Collinsville Great Streets, and the Downtown St. Louis Multimodal Plan. Jacque serves as the chair for the Community Mobility Committee, an advisory committee for the City of St. Louis on items related to walking, biking, and micromobility issues. Jacque has a Master of Urban Planning, a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies, all from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS.
  • Rodrigo Reis is Professor of Public Health at the Brown School, Washington University in Saint Louis,  and his research focuses on built and community environment and public health, with particular interest in community interventions for promoting physical activity, the effect of the built environment and active transportation on physical activity and health.

Power to the People

Community engagement strategies are critical in giving voice to those who know best what is needed to make their spaces active and engaged. Learn how to capture the on the ground perspective and work with community members in this session.

About the Panel

Phyllis Viola Boyd is an artist and urban strategist and currently serves as the Executive Director of Groundwork Indy, a non-profit organization that engages youth in community-based projects that equitably enhance environmental, economic, and social well-being.  Before joining Groundwork Indy, Phyllis practiced landscape architecture and urban planning in the for-profit sector, where her work focused on sustainable design and planning and supporting the efforts of diverse communities to transform their built environments into meaningful, relevant, and life-enhancing places.

Shaughnessy Daniels is the Community Engagement Manager at Great Rivers Greenway where she leads the agency’s efforts to gather critical input to guide planning and implementation for greenway projects. Shaughnessy’s career has been focused on strengthening communities and the people that live within them. She has a long history and broad range of experience in non-profit development, community and capacity and local civic efforts. Prior to joining Great Rivers Greenway Shaughnessy served as Vice President of Community Supports at St. Louis Arc, a local non-profit that supports people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and Vice President at Urban Strategies Inc., a national non-profit that provide social and economic supports families affected by broad-scale community redevelopment. Shaughnessy also served as Assistant to the President at St. Louis 2004, a citizen-based initiative to launch major regional revitalization projects.

Sheila Styron works as Blindness Low Vision specialist for The Whole Person, a center for independent living in Kansas City MO, and was the first person who is blind to have become certified as an ADA Coordinator and trainer. She served two terms as president of Guide Dog Users, Inc. and two terms as board chair of Learning Ally, in Los Angeles. Sheila is a strong advocate for eliminating barriers for people living with disabilities, promotes public transportation and worked with the Department of Justice on its revised definition of service animals. Sheila participated in designing accessible tours for the Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the Nelson Atkins in Kansas City and provides accessible outdoor experiences for people who are blind and have low vision. Formerly a professional musician, Sheila enjoys playing the ukulele,yoga and cross-country skiing as well as pursuing adventures like swimming with dolphins and skydiving.

 

Land Use for Walkability

It takes more than infrastructure to create a walkable community. Explore how zoning and other policies and practices related to land-use can have a major impact on how our communities, move, act, and engage in this interactive breakout session.

About the Speaker: Heather Cole Zaccaro is the Program Manager for the National Complete Streets Coalition. They perform quantitative, qualitative, and spatial analysis to support the Coalition’s reports and resources. They also coordinate the Coalition’s ongoing technical assistance programs and co-author articles, case studies, and toolkits. Prior to joining Smart Growth America, they conducted research on health-related behaviors in New York City and Brazil. They hold a Master of Science in City Design & Social Science from the London School of Economics & Political Science and a Bachelor of Science in International Health from Georgetown University.

Places for People

There’s nothing better than seeing people enjoy their public spaces. Community activities of all types can be used to encourage physical activity, social engagement, and mental well-being.

 

About the Panel

Dr. Tom Schmid is Senior Advisor in the Physical Activity and Health Branch in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, CDC. He serves as the CDC technical advisor to America Walks the nation’s premiere walking advocacy and action organization, to PAPREN, a consortium of university-based policy researchers and as a consultant to the Physical Activity Research Center (PARC), a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded effort to identify effective strategies to promote physical activity in poor and underserved minority youth in rural and other communities.

Mark Vogl is a project manager for planning at Great Rivers Greenway where he collaborates with district staff to expand the River Ring, a planned 600-mile system of parks, trails and greenways that will interconnect the St. Louis region. With a background in urban planning and landscape architecture, Mark is responsible for overseeing the planning and design of greenway projects within the District’s master plan. Prior to joining the district in 2013, Mark spent nearly twenty years with HOK and was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Panama. He studied Urban Design at Washington University and received a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from Kansas State University.

Aaron Williams is a community developer and organizer in The Ville neighborhood of St. Louis where he serves on the board of the neighborhood community development corporation Northside Community Housing, Inc. and as a co-founder of 4theVille, a community-based tourism and arts organization. Through these organizations, he has developed several initiatives that emphasize community empowerment and community ownership of public spaces. Two of the more popular initiatives include Northside Trap Run, a hip-hop themed 5K that promotes healthy lifestyles and a healthy north St. Louis, and, The Heart of The Ville walking tours, historic tours that educate attendees about the legacy of the neighborhood while promoting more foot traffic.

The Future of Walkability Is Now

Micro-mobility is sweeping the nation in the form of escooters and bike share programs, but let’s not let this distract from the original form of transportation- walking! Explore issues surrounding walkability and these new forms of transportation as we discuss what we want for the future of our communities.

Active Friendly Routes to Everyday Destinations

People need places to go and healthy ways to get there. A holistic view of community planning creates this and has a wide range of positive impacts on the design of a place.

About the Panel

Holly Moskerintz, Community Programs Outreach Manager, National Association of REALTORS® Holly plans and manages programs to enhance, revitalize and build communities to make them better places to live.  She has been at NAR for over 11 years and has worked on NAR’s Smart Growth, including Placemaking and Walkable Communities, and Housing Opportunities Programs.

Nate Johnson is the President of Real Estate Solutions and works in an Agent Development role, coaching and training agents at Redkey Realty Leaders in St. Louis, MO. Nate served as the 2018 President of the Missouri Association of REALTORS and is the 2020 NAR Liaison for Public & Federal Issues. Nate instructs classes and speaks to groups around the country on a variety of topics including Smart Growth, Fair Housing, Ethics, Business Development & Leadership.

The Bottom Line

Walking is good for your health and the health of your community. Explore ways that investment into walkable communiites is changing the shape and livability of our places.

About the Panel

DARA ESKRIDGE, LEED AP ND, is the Executive Director of Invest STL, a regional initiative to prioritize and support equitable community development in St. Louis. Leading Invest STL, Eskridge directs grantmaking to support neighborhood-based, resident-driven community change. Working with the local philanthropic network, government, banks and universities, she seeks to build a broad coalition of community partners to re-establish the community development ecosystem in St. Louis, centered on policy creation that advances racial equity, civic participation and economic mobility.

Prior to Invest STL, Dara served as Director of Operations for Urban Strategies, a national nonprofit that works with residents, grassroots organizations, local governments and developers to re-build distressed urban core communities into vibrant residential neighborhoods. In addition to overseeing USI’s St. Louis portfolio and team, she led economic development and community engagement for the $30M federal Near North Side Choice Neighborhood initiative in St. Louis. Additionally, Ms. Eskridge formerly served as Senior Planner for the St. Louis County Executive’s Office of Strategy + Innovation where she helped direct regional strategic initiatives, community strategy development and performance measurement for government operations. Previous roles also include serving as a community planner, policy specialist and urban designer with St. Louis County Planning, City of St. Louis Homeless Services and the Bridgeport Housing Authority in Connecticut.

Eskridge earned her graduate degree in Urban Planning from Columbia University in New York and her Bachelor of Architecture from Tuskegee University in Alabama. She is a LEED Accredited Professional for Neighborhood Development.

John O’Gorman leads the ambitious fundraising operations for Forest Park Forever. Since joining Forest Park Forever in January 2012, O’Gorman has overseen the growth of the conservancy’s annual fundraising from $2.2 million to more than $3.2 million, as well as the successful completion of a $130 million capital and endowment campaign, the most ambitious in Forest Park history.

Prior to this role, O’Gorman was an executive with a national fundraising consultant firm. He served as counsel to civic, cultural, educational, healthcare and religious organizations throughout the Midwest and East Coast, managing transformational campaigns that raised more than $600 million for the firm’s clients.

O’Gorman is a member of the St. Louis Chapter of the Association for Fundraising Professionals and has served on its Programming board.

Walkable Communities for Who?

Walkable communities that are not accessible or inviting to all community members are not walkable. This session will explore the strategies, resources, and considerations necessary to make sure we are achieving our mission of truly walkable places.

About the Panel

  • Lonny Boring, Senior Project Manager, Great Rivers Greenway District: Lonny Boring is Senior Project Manager for Great Rivers Greenway, the St. Louis region’s park and trail agency. Since 2008, he has managed more than $150 million in greenway and infrastructure improvement projects.   He served as Great Rivers Greenway’s lead project manager for the public-private CityArchRiver partnership. This transformational project delivered major improvements to the Gateway Arch National Park including renovations to the historic landscape and expanded museum.   It also included the complete redesign and reconstruction of Kiener Plaza in downtown St. Louis.  He is currently working to complete the connection between the River des Peres Greenway and Gravois Greenway: Grant’s Trail.  Lonny earned a bachelor’s degree from Missouri University of Science & Technology and a master’s degree from the Nicholas School for the Environment at Duke University.
  • Krista Dye and Carol Griffin of Special Olympics Missouri: Special Olympics Missouri is the world’s largest public health organization and sports organization for people with intellectual disabilities. Our athletes find joy, confidence and fulfillment — on the playing field and in life. They also inspire people in their communities and elsewhere to open their hearts to a wider world of human talents and potential. Many of our athletes come to us with neglected health problems. At State Games and other events, we offer a wide range of free health screenings and care. Our goal is to bring better fitness, nutrition and healthier lifestyles to everyone involved in Special Olympics — from athletes and their families, to coaches and volunteers.

Investing in Rural Communities: The Economic Development and Health Impacts of Trails

The 191-mile Rock Island Trail is expected to breathe new life into dozens of small, rural communities in Missouri, which have been in decline since the days of the railroad. In conjunction with the existing Katy Trail (which has an estimated economic impact of $18.5 million per year) the Rock Island will complete a walking/bicycling loop that traverses more than 300 miles back and forth across the state. This panel discussion will explore the health and economic development benefits of rural trails through the eyes of a researcher, a business entrepreneur, a rural public health professional, and a trails advocate. 

Learning Objectives:

After this panel discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss challenges facing rural communities today
  • Identify general benefits of walking/biking trails in rural communities
  • Give specific examples of trails benefiting rural economic development
  • Give specific examples of trails benefiting rural health
  • Relate the continuing story of the Rock Island Trail

About the Panel

  • Pat Curry: University of Missouri Extension, retired: Pat Curry is an analyst, planner, and entrepreneur with over thirty years of experience helping rural places find solutions to economic development challenges. He has authored over 100 plans and research papers during his career.
    As an entrepreneur he owns and manages a consulting company providing research and planning services to communities and businesses. He has a master’s degree in geography from Southern Illinois University.
  • Greg Harris: Executive Director, Missouri Rock Island Trail: Greg Harris has been Executive Director of Missouri Rock Island Trail since 2015. The non-profit coalition of communities, businesses and individuals seeks to preserve the 191 mile former Rock Island Railroad corridor as a recreational trail. The first 47 miles opened in December, 2016 as part of Katy Trail State Park and the next 144 miles is being rail-banked.
    Greg had retired from Missouri University of Science & Technology in Rolla, MO as Executive Director of Development after 17 years, working to secure major gifts and planned gifts. Before that, he was Campaign Director for United Way of the Ozarks in Springfield 10 years. He has worked at Walt’s Bike Shop in Columbia, MO, managed Sunshine Cycles in Springfield, MO and Coventry Cycles in Wichita, KS. Greg was a sales rep for Trek in its early years.
    In the 1980’s, Greg was honored to volunteer with the late Darwin Hindman to secure endorsements in Springfield, MO for the Katy Trail. That led to serving on the Springfield-Greene County Park Board where Greg successfully proposed they preserve what is now the 35 mile Frisco High Line Trail to Bolivar, MO. That led to co-founding Ozark Greenways. He served a decade on the Trails Advisory Board for Missouri State Parks that awards $1.5 million per year for trails. Greg grew up in car-centric suburban St. Louis and enjoys walking or bicycling most days from his home in Rolla.
  • Kim Henderson is the owner of Kim’s Cabins in Windsor at the crossroads of the Katy and Rock Island trails.  Kim, and Windsor, have seen firsthand the economic impact of what trails can do for a small community.  After starting one cabin in 2015, three more were added by 2018.  Currently folks visit for all different reasons including trails.  Kim was previously City Administrator for the town of 2900, and a banker for 22 years.  Seeing young people come back to buy homes, start businesses, and raise their children in the small town has been one incentive.  Kim also serves on the Board of Missouri Rock Island Trail.
  • Tiffany Rutledge is a Registered Nurse with Capital Region Medical Center in Jefferson City, MO where she manages corporate, community and employee wellness services.  She has spearheaded numerous multi-county community health needs assessments where her skills as a connector have been able to bring together partners in public health, government, business, non-profit organizations, service providers into one space in order to collaborate on issues such as making a community more walkable
  • Ian Thomas, PhD: State and Local Program Director, America Walks: Ian Thomas is the State and Local Program Director with America Walks. In this role, he develops and delivers education programs for advocates, professionals, and elected officials, about the benefits of walkable communities and strategies to create them.
    From 2000 until 2013, Ian served as the founding Executive Director of the PedNet Coalition of Columbia, MO. During this time, he developed one of the largest Walking School Bus programs in the country, coordinated a campaign that led to Columbia adopting the first “complete streets’ policy in Missouri, and was instrumental in reducing neighborhood speed limits.
    In 2013 and again in 2016 and 2019, Ian won election to the Columbia City Council, where he continues to advance healthy and walkable community policies. He is a member of Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council.

 

The Art of Learning…while Walking*

Two hundred people walking and learning about the history of their city and neighborhoods, architectural styles and public art (at the same time)?  And all in 60 minutes?  And free for participants?  It happens in Columbus. A partnership between Columbus Public Health and Columbus Landmarks, a non-profit advocate for historic preservation, created a series of walking tours, “Art Walks and Landmark Talks,” to make summer a time to get people moving.  The workshop’s purpose is to give ideas that can be replicated regarding logistics and costs and to share advantages and obstacles that come with success when a group of 20 walkers on a tour grows after six years to number more than 200.

Attendees of this workshop will be able to:

  • Describe the development and implementation of free walking tours.
  • Discuss successes and challenges associated public walking tours.

Facilitators: Phil Hanson and Doreen Uhas Sauer.

Creating Low Stress Bikeways for All Users*

Active transportation encompasses not just walkability but also bikeability and moveability. Columbus built its first separated bike lanes along Summit Street in the University District in 2016. Extending for almost 1 ½ miles, the bikeway includes a floating parking lane, bicycle signal heads, turn queue boxes, and bus waiting islands. This low-stress bikeway has been a very positive addition to the growing Columbus bikeway network, as well as for people who walk, but has not been without lessons learned and challenges in accommodating all road users.

Creative Revival of the Walkable Neighborhood*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

What happens when one of the most notorious neighborhoods ever is suddenly fair game all at once?  Franklinton suffered a cataclysmic flood in 1913 leading to decades of economic stagnation earning the nickname of “The Bottoms” and a reputation as the place to avoid.  The 2003 completion of the flood-wall was supposed to change all of that over night.  It didn’t. But eventually, art did.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Be bold! Describe how big audacious ideas, if they come from a legitimate place, can change your built environment.
  • Explain why arts and cultural institutions are the best activators of sidewalk life

Facilitator: Jim Sweeney

A Streetscape Transformation in Columbus’ Densest District*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

The High Street Streetscape Improvements project creates a safer, more walkable and even more inclusive neighborhood. The project – located just outside the Hilton Columbus Downtown – is situated in a thriving corridor that’s one of the region’s densest, bustling with residents and visitors nearly all hours of the day. Meanwhile, the broader region is in the midst of a growth spurt, on pace to gain one million additional residents by 2050.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Gain insights on the nuances of designing a streetscape that meets the needs of a growing, dense space which needs to be inclusive of a variety of modes
  • Understand solutions for managing access and engaging the public throughout a very visual construction process

Facilitator: Mindy Justis

Experience the Future of Mobility*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Experience the future of mobility and Columbus at the Smart Columbus Experience Center. Hear from the teams at Smart Columbus and the Central Ohio Transit Authority about the technology that’s helping Columbus smart and pedestrian friendly.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Describe how mobility is the foundation of a smart, inclusive city
  • Discuss how transit is the backbone of any smart mobility strategy
  • Explain how walkability impacts the accessibility of a multi-modal lifestyle

Facilitator: Alyssa Chenault

The Goodale Hook: Tackling Difficult Walkability Gaps with Innovative Solutions*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

The Harrison West community was virtually cut off from Columbus’ major greenway trail network, the Olentangy River, and safe connectivity to nearby downtown.  Two projects, the Harrison West rail trail, and the Goodale connector, brings together a thriving older neighborhood and large scale new mixed use developments by use of a two-stage bridge and an abandoned trail trail.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Understand how community-driven input can energize developers, trail experts, and  urban designers to create bold solutions to a barrier-filled corridor.
  • Identify the tasks, costs, and challenges involved with large-scale pedestrian infrastructure projects.

Facilitators: Katie White and Bradley Westall

The Transformation of the Downtown Columbus Riverfront*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Over the past 20 years, the Downtown Columbus Riverfront has been transformed, with six new riverfront parks that total more than 180 acres of greenspace and restored riparian habitat. Tour participants will visit these riverfront parks to experience the different features of each, from the event pavilion at North Bank Park, to the accessible pedestrian and bicycle pathways along the Scioto Mile, to the signature fountain and restaurant at Bicentennial Park. The crowning achievement in this riverfront renaissance was the removal of the Main Street Dam, which created 33 new acres of park space and restored the river to its original width.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Demonstrate how to plan for and design dynamic river edge parks that enable access for all users.
  • Describe how to remove unnecessary infrastructure to improve river health, riparian edges, and accessibility.

Facilitators: Andrew Overbeck

Arena District: From Brownfield to Thriving Downtown Entertainment Destination*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Discover how the Arena District master plan created a new, mixed-use, walkable, entertainment district on a former brownfield site. Participants will explore the unique connections (I-670 freeway cap and Arena Crossing), park and plaza spaces (McFerson Commons and North Bank Park), and streets (Nationwide Boulevard and Ludlow Alley) that seamlessly integrate the Arena District into downtown. This walking tour will also feature the district’s main attractions, including Nationwide Arena, Huntington Park, the future home of the Columbus Crew, music venues, and many restaurants.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Describe how to integrate a new district into an existing downtown core.
  • Understand how multiple connections and high-quality public spaces can support a pedestrian environment and meet the high automobile needs of an office and entertainment anchored district

Facilitator: Chris Hermann

Jeffrey Park and 4th Street District*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Take a walk from the convention through a bit of the short north to one of Columbus’s bet large scale mixed use developments. Located in Italian Village, Jeffrey Park is situated in a 41 acre urban development less than a mile from Downtown Columbus. This ultra-convenient urban living community features retail, office, single-family homes, condominiums & high-end apartment homes. These 41 acres were once home to Jeffrey Manufacturing during the second industrial revolution, so come learn about how it came to be what it is today.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Explain how public and private partnerships can revive a neighborhood.
  • Discuss the remediation of land that was once the site of a major industrial complex.

Facilitators: Matt Negron and Steve Bollinger

The Discovery Trail*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

The Discovery District is a unique area because it is home to our city’s art museum, four higher education institutions (including Columbus College of Art & Design), the nation’s number one library, two historic districts and two major employers. Currently, the area is not walkable because of the width of Broad Street, poor condition of sidewalks and abundance of surface parking lots. Our goal is to develop a Discovery Trail to improve safety, connectivity and address the barrier of car-centric design. Part of that includes small-scale projects that develop a sense of place and encourage people to explore further.

Attendees of this workshop will:

  • Explain how improvements in the public right of way, including intersections, can create a sense of place while improving safety and connectivity.
  • Demonstrate small-scale interventions that can build quick support for larger projects

Facilitators: Cass Freeland and Jess Matthews

Urban Abolitionists Talk and Trek*

This is a Learning-from-Place workshop, pre-registration is required to attend. Please click here to register for this workshop.

Join GirlTrek, the largest movement for Black women, and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, the nation’s largest trails organization, in a spirited walk and talk to share great ideas about how to build community using the newly announced Great American Rail-Trail. We will explore a segment of the trail in true GirlTrek style and learn more about the GirlTrek Mission, and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s vision for the Great American Rail-Trail. This trail will be a historically powerful tool that, aligned with the mission of GirlTrek, will continue to unite neighborhoods and communities across the United States for years to come.

Building Connections, Overcoming Barriers

The insight2050 Corridor Concepts brings new tools and modeling capacity to decision about where and how to grow, where to invest transit resources and how to balance community goals.  Walkability is instrumental in the land use, transit and community goals as higher density development and better transit options encourage walking.  In short, walking is embedded in the DNA of the Corridor Concepts and central Ohio’s future.  Learn how the Corridor Concepts have inspired a region to take immediate action in making their community more transit friendly and walkable.

Download the Presentation

Moderator: Jennifer Noll,  Principal Planner, Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC

About the Panel

  • Justin Goodwin, AICP is the Transportation Planning Manager for the City of Columbus Department of Public Service. His responsibilities include a wide variety of multi-modal planning and street design initiatives, including long range thoroughfare planning, active transportation systems, and coordination with agency partners such as COTA and MORPC. Justin holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Geography from Ohio University, and a Master of City and Regional Planning from The Ohio State University, where he also periodically teaches. Justin is an advocate for multi-modal commuting, and mixes cycling, transit, driving and shared mobility in his daily and weekly travel.
  • Claudia Husak’s responsibilities as a Planner with the City of Dublin have included work on many aspects of the transformative Bridge Street District, which includes the intent of creating a walkable environment with interconnected streets that can accommodate multiple modes of transportation. As a first for this central Ohio suburb, requirements for Dublin’s new downtown include complete street elements to promote an integrated, balanced, and safe transportation network for all users. Throughout the implementation of development within the Bridge Street District, Claudia and her team have worked with developers and policy makers to ensure that this new and innovative type of development in the City of Dublin includes Complete Streets principles with new roadways that accommodate users of all ages and abilities, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, motorists, persons with disabilities, and adjacent land users.
  • Shannon Sorrell serves as Director of Parks and Recreation with the City of Whitehall.  With a background in public parks and recreation, nonprofit operations, accounting and business administration, Shannon is passionate about her role in redeveloping Whitehall’s park amenities and services alongside a great team of staff, administration and city leadership.
    Shannon enjoys all things outdoors – hiking, camping, fishing, sports and exploring with her kids – and making new programs and experiences a possibility for the families of Whitehall.  With the mantra of “go and do good” and the belief “done is more important than perfect”, the team in Whitehall is making a huge impact across the City.
  • Zach Sunderland, AICP is a Senior Service Planner at the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA).  He has a Bachelor of Science in Urban Planning and a Masters in Community Planning both from the University of Cincinnati.  He is currently a member of American Public Transportation Association (APTA)’s Emerging Leaders Class of 2020.

Collective Action Planning (3:00pm – 4:45pm)

Designed by the local host committee, the collective action workshop will be an opportunity for conference attendees to use their knowledge and experiences to move forward a specific question or issue for the host region/city. These workshops will be hands on exercises designed to develop skills, build connections, provide feedback, and move the needle on walkability.

Lunch Keynote “Where Are We Going” (12:15pm – 1:30pm)

What’s ahead for walking and active transportation in Columbus, across the state, and throughout the US? This plenary will hear from a moderated panel discussion of decision-makers who are at the forefront of shaping our communities and defining our mobility opportunities.

About the Moderator

Update: Toks Omishakin, 43, of Nashville, TN  has been appointed as the new director of the California Department of Transportation. He will start this new journey late October 2019. Omishakin has been Deputy Commissioner for Environment and Planning Bureau at the Tennessee Department of Transportation since 2011.  He was director of Healthy Living Initiatives in the Nashville Mayor’s Office from 2008 to 2011.  Omishakin earned a Master of Arts degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Jackson State University.

In October of 2011, Toks Omishakin was appointed Assistant Commissioner and Chief of Environment and Planning at the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT). In this position, he leads TDOT’s continued success in establishing environmental, multi-modal and transportation planning policies necessary to make it one of the best state DOT’s in the country. He is responsible for the bureau’s administrative and project budget that exceeds $300 million annually. He leads the activities of the divisions of Environmental Services, Long-Range Planning, and Multimodal Transportation Resources. In 2014, he was promoted to Deputy Commissioner at TDOT.

Prior to joining TDOT, he served as the Director of Healthy Living Initiatives in the Office of Mayor – Karl Dean in Nashville, Tennessee. There he led efforts to develop Metro Nashville’s – Complete Streets Policy and helped establish a more balanced approach to transportation planning and design for the city. He also spearheaded the creation of two Bicycle Sharing programs (Nashville BCycle and Nashville Green Bikes) for the city. He was the Mayor’s liaison to several organizations and boards created to improve livability, the built environment, and transportation. Omishakin has been a speaker and presenter at several national and international conferences and his work has been published in The American Journal of Preventative Medicine and profiled in The Wall Street Journal, HBO Documentaries and Newsweek magazine.

He was appointed by Governor Bill Haslam to the Board of the Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway Authority in 2012 and the Governor’s Rural Development Task Force in 2015. He also serves on the Board of Directors at America Walks, the Civil Engineering and Environment Advisory Board at Tennessee Tech University and is Co-Chair of the Tennessee Regions Roundtable Network. He is an active member of the American Planning Association (APA), and the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE). He holds a Master’s Degree in Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) with concentrations in transportation planning and urban design from Jackson State University, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Technology from Mississippi Valley State University.

About the Panel

State Rep. Randi Clites (D-Ravenna) is a proven leader and tireless advocate for her community. She currently represents Ohio’s 75th House District, which includes much of central and southern Portage County.

A grassroots advocate at heart, Rep. Clites began her activism when her son was diagnosed with a rare genetic bleeding disorder—then leukemia—at a young age. She has since dedicated herself to giving back to the community that has given her so much, fighting to increase access to quality, affordable healthcare, improve community services and make Ohio a national leader in advanced energy technology.

Rep. Clites has worked as Associate Director of the Northern Ohio Hemophilia Foundation, Advocacy Coordinator for the Ohio Bleeding Disorders Council and has represented Ohio through the Association of Maternal and Child Health Family Scholar Program.

Clites served on the 2006 Legislative Task Force on the Future Funding of the state’s Title V program, where she fought for Ohio’s most vulnerable children. She has also served as Chair of the Parent Advisory Council. Clites received the Advocate of the Year award from the National Hemophilia Foundation for her continued work to increase awareness at the local, state and national levels.

In addition, she has been an active volunteer in her community, working with Akron Children’s Hospital, Portage County Big Brothers and Sisters and as a long-time softball coach in her community.

Randi, her husband Matt, her son Colton, and their two dogs are lifelong residents of Portage County.

Lloyd MacAdam, ODOT Chief Engineer, is a 22-year veteran with ODOT’s management team.

Prior to his appointment as Chief Engineer, he served 7 years as District 11’s Deputy Director, he served the department as a Regional Projects Manager for ODOT’s Northeast Ohio’s Real Estate Office in Akron. He also served as Production Administrator for District 11 for over 5 years.

Prior to his career in ODOT, Lloyd worked for the City of Akron Bureau of Engineering, the Summit County Engineer’s office, 4 different Engineering Design firms and was a full time professor at the Kent State University Tuscarawas Campus in the Engineering Technology Department.

MacAdam graduated from the University of Akron in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. In addition to being a professional engineer, MacAdam also has his professional surveyor’s license and was a 2008 graduate of Ohio’s Certified Public Manager Program.

He and his wife, Carol, reside in New Philadelphia, Ohio and have raised four sons and are the proud grandparents of 4 wonderful grandchildren.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine nominated Mary Mertz as Director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.

Mertz served as the First Assistant Attorney General under Mike DeWine in the Attorney General’s Office, where she oversaw both the legal and administrative operations of the office.

She has extensive legal experience in both the private and public sectors, having practiced law at a large multi-national firm.

Mertz also served as chief of staff to Mike DeWine while he was Lt. Governor; as the legislative director to Congressman Bob McEwen; in the office of legislative affairs in the White House; and worked with the Department of Natural Resources while working for Ohio Gov. George V. Voinovich.

Mertz is an avid sailor and outdoorsperson.

State Senator Steve Wilson is currently serving his first term in the Ohio Senate, representing all or part of Butler, Hamilton and Warren counties.

An Ohio native and long-time Warren County resident, Senator Steve Wilson has built a career of dedicated service to both his community and his profession. From the time he was honorably discharged as a Naval Officer in 1975, Senator Wilson focused his efforts on an entry-level position at Lebanon Citizens National Bank (LCNB) and public service in his community.

Forty-one years later, Mr. Wilson is the recently retired CEO of LCNB Corp. and LCNB National Bank. He continues in his position of chairman of the board. Although he has stepped away from his daily professional responsibilities, he continues to participate in important positions of service in Warren County and southwestern Ohio.

Senator Wilson has always sought to give back to the community, making it a better place to live, work and raise a family. He believes that quality education and schools, as well as responsible community planning and creating good-paying jobs, are the tenets to growing a strong living and working environment for all Ohioans.

Throughout Senator Wilson’s career in both the business and volunteer sectors, one practice has been consistent: he has never assumed that he understood all of the workings of any particular organization. When he made a commitment, he would immerse himself in learning everything he could about that group. A prime example of his willingness to learn was his accepting an entry-level position as a teller at the LCNB.

Senator Wilson and his wife, Jill, live in Maineville. They have four children and five grandchildren and are active members of the Otterbein United Methodist Church.

Opening Ceremony and Welcome – “The Story of Place” (8:00am-9:00am)

Today we face challenges in how we design and use our cities to support safe mobility, thriving economies, and the physical, mental and social well-being of all community members. This panel will look at some of the ways we can design our public space, engage our communities, and prepare for the towns of tomorrow.

About our Speakers

Urban Designer Mukul Malhotra develops innovative solutions for the new American City.  As a Principal at MIG, Inc., his award-winning designs have created thriving downtowns and historic districts as well as livable new communities and university campuses. His work has inspired urban revitalization, multimodal connectivity, sustainability, community inclusivity, and preservation of historic and neighborhood character. He is co-author of Streets Reconsidered: Inclusive Design for the Public Realm. He currently serves as President of America Walks – a national organization that is committed to increasing walking and walkability in America.

Health Commissioner Dr. Mysheika W. Roberts leads Columbus Public Health and a team of nearly 500 public health professionals who are focused on neighborhood-based approaches that address the social determinants of health,  from safe, affordable housing and education to jobs and violent crime, in order to decrease the health disparities that exist.

Dr. Roberts has a prolific 18-year public health background at the local, state and national levels. Prior to her appointment as Health Commissioner in December 2017, she was the Medical Director and Assistant Health Commissioner at Columbus Public Health. She also built a solid foundation in public health early in her career by investigating outbreaks in Ohio for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and leading an STD clinic and hepatitis prevention efforts at the Baltimore City Health Department.

Dr. Roberts extends her service to the community beyond the walls of Columbus Public Health where she is active on several boards, including the Columbus Medical Association Foundation, YWCA of Columbus and the Mid-Ohio Food Bank, as well as the Lifeline of Ohio Minority Advisory Group and OhioHealth’s Faith, Culture and Community Benefit Committee. She also serves as a mentor in OhioHealth’s Physician Diversity Scholars Program.

She earned her MD from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and her MPH from the University of Michigan.

A native of Los Angeles, she now calls Columbus home and enjoys spending down time with her husband Edward and their dogs Cosby and Rudy.

Jim Sweeney, a lifelong Columbus resident, became Executive Director of the Franklinton Development Association Community Development Corporation in 2002, one year before the completion of the Franklinton floodwall. In his 14 years in that role Jim led the effort to revitalize Franklinton through creation of over 150 affordable housing units, various community building activities including founding the Franklinton Arts District, and aggressive neighborhood advocacy on all levels. Jim moved Franklinton, aka “The Bottoms”, to the center of the discussion about central-Ohio development. He built consensus around the revitalization of East Franklinton as an arts destination, an initiative which gained support of city hall and has now begun the path to reality.  Jim is active on several boards including the Columbus Landmarks Foundation and the Franklinton Arts District.

He current operates as Sweeney & Associates, a neighborhood revitalization/creative community consultancy. The firm draws on the talents that established Franklinton as an arts destination. Services include revitalization planning, creative placemaking, and “making” a makerspace.

Planning for Tomorrow, Today

We don’t know what the future will hold, but we do know some of the challenges we will face. Plans to face those challenges need to happen now and will be explored in this session.

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Moderator: Kevin Mills, Vice President of Policy, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

About the Panel

  • Chris Hermann is a principal with MKSK and a certified city planner with more than 28 years of planning experience. Chris has managed a wide variety of projects throughout the Midwest, Midsouth, and Ohio involving regional planning policy, comprehensive plans, downtown and focus area plans, community improvement, economic development, transportation planning, and public engagement and facilitation. Chris has led MKSK project teams for several award-winning transportation, street connectivity, and complete street improvement plans including the I-670 Design Enhancement Study, the Bike New Albany Plan, and the nationally-recognized Long Street Bridge and Cultural Wall. Chris is also an adjunct faculty member of the Ohio State University’s Knowlton School of Architecture, a board member of Transit Columbus, and a member of the ULI Transportation Task Force.
  • Jeff Kupko is an Associate with Michael Baker International with 14 years of experience. He is in Michael Baker’s emerging technology practice and leads the smart communities initiatives. Currently, he sits on site at Smart Columbus as a City project manager and is responsible for leading the AV shuttle and Smart Mobility Hubs projects. He has a bachelors and masters of civil engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, is a licensed PE in four states, and a licensed PTOE.
  • Steven Streit is the mayor of Lockport, Illinois, a historic canal town of 25,000 residents along the Des Plains River. Streit was a machinist in the U.S. Navy, a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and, for the last twenty years, has run his marketing and design firm, oh!Design, Inc.Before running for mayor, Streit volunteered on many of Lockport’s community organizations. Finally being fed up with a dysfunctional city council, he ran for office in 2013. Streit is now mid-way through his second term.

Designing for All Ages: Accessibility and Inclusion Through Walkability

Communities that are designed with our youngest and oldest community members in mind are inevitably safer and more accessible for all. Learn from innovative programs and projects that are working to make sure communities are places for people of all ages.

Moderator: David Dixon FAIA, Vice President, Planning and Urban Design Leader Stantec’s Urban Places

About the Panel

  • Tiwana Henderson serves as the Administrative Assistant to the Center for Surgical Outcomes Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Recently in partnership with Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, Tiwana has designed, strategized and implemented PlayStreets on Whittier. Tiwana’s passion in life is to open up a world of possibility for the next generation.
  • Nick Jones serves as Director of the Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families initiative at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. In his time with Nationwide Children’s, Nick has overseen significant program growth addressing health equity and social determinants of health issues through affordable housing, employment, education, safety, and wellness interventions. Prior to his role at Nationwide Children’s, Nick served as Chief Operating Officer for Boys & Girls Clubs of Columbus. Nick has over thirteen (13) years of professional experience in social services and healthcare administration. Nick is married with one child. He holds a J.D. and M.B.A.
  • Katie White is the Director of Age-Friendly Communities at The Ohio State University College of Social Work. Ms. White graduated with a degree in gerontology and has spent her career working and volunteering with older adults. Her experience in person-centered program development at the Alzheimer’s Association sparked an ongoing passion for elevating the voice of older adults in the community, which was further strengthened in her role as founding Executive Director of Village Connections. Her dedication to inclusive-planning served as the foundation for the Age-Friendly Columbus initiative within the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission and continues to guide her daily work advocating with and for older adults.

 

A Culture of Health

Walking is a great way to change the health of an individual and a community with a single step. This session will explore programs and partnerships that help to get community members moving, improving the physical, mental, and social well-being of all.

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Moderator: Wendy Landman, Executive Director, WalkBoston

About the Panel

Chyna- Lloyd Nicole Johnson serves as Director of Impact at GirlTrek. She joined GirlTrek in 2017 as the Summer Fellow while completing her graduate degree at Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. During her time in GirlTrek she has served in several roles. The latest being the Director of Data Management where she oversaw management of GirlTrek internal systems, information management and administrative program support.

In her current role as Director of Impact she oversees the development and implementation of the systems and tools that identify and capture the depth and breadth of GirlTrek’s impact. In this role she is responsible for the collection, management, and analysis of impact data and works closely with the each facet of the GirlTrek team.

Chyna is originally from Columbus, Ohio. She received her Bachelors of Arts in Chemistry and African & African American Studies from Berea College in Berea, Kentucky and earned her Master of Public Health from Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She now resides in the Atlanta area.

Larry Smith founded the German Village Walking Club in 2015 after he and his wife sold their house in the suburbs, and moved to downtown Columbus to live their empty-nester dreams! Smith, a chemical engineer by training, is a leading expert in Brownfield redevelopment. His particular focus is helping small communities in Ohio turn run-down and abandoned properties in the urban core, back to beneficial reuse such as parks and mixed use development. When not working or walking, Smith loves to travel with his wife to visit their two adult children and families in Chicago and Vermont.

David Sabgir, M.D., a Columbus, Ohio, native and full-time cardiologist at Mount Carmel Health System, founded Walk with a Doc in 2005 after becoming frustrated by his inability to affect behavior change in a clinical setting.  Many years later, Dr. Sabgir continues to personally invite his patients to walk alongside him as a Walk with a Doc leader.

As CEO of Walk with a Doc, Dr. Sabgir cultivates a strategic vision for the organization, develops vital partnerships and educates others about the medical benefits of movement and social connection.  He absolutely loves Walk with a Doc and sees it as an important next step in care of our communities.

 

From Policy to Practice: Policies and Programs to Support Active Transportation

Political will and institutional support is important for growing active transportation networks. Policies such as Complete Streets, Vision Zero, and more can be building blocks to active commutes. Learn more on how these policies get turned into action at this session.

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Moderator: Kevin Mills, Vice President of Policy, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

About the Panel

  • Jennifer Alford is a civil engineer with more than 22 years of design and analysis experience in traffic, highway, and site/civil engineering. She holds professional licenses as Professional Engineer and Professional Traffic Operations Engineer. Jennifer has served as the City of Westerville’s Traffic Engineer since December 2017, where her role involves being a problem solver, human psychologist (understanding people’s interesting driving habits) and an integral part of the city design team to develop safe and people-friendly environments. Her current projects include Westerville’s Strategic Mobility Plan, along with signage, intersection, signals, speed limit, and multi-mode integration management.Jennifer volunteers as Webmaster for the Great Lakes District of the Institute of Transportation Engineers, and has been involved with many engineering organizations over the years – including the American Society of Highway Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, Women’s Transportation Seminar, and Engineers Without Borders. In 2006, she was named the Ohio Young Engineer of the Year by the Ohio Society of Professional Engineers for the State of Ohio and Franklin County, and served the Engineers’ Club of Columbus as president in 2006-2007. She is a graduate of the Ohio State University.
  • Alexandra Petrella is an Associate Planner at the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), where she coordinates the Transportation Demand Management Strategic Plan to mitigate single occupancy vehicle use and improve air quality for the Central Ohio Region. Alexandra also focuses on alternative transportation planning and works with regional partners to encourage smart growth and sustainability through innovative education and outreach initiatives.
    Alexandra previously served as a Transportation Planner for VN Engineers, where she studied crash data and field analyses to make design recommendations to multi-modal facilities that improve safety and livability for Connecticut road users. She is a graduate of The Ohio State University with a degree in City and Regional Planning.
  • Dr. Katherine Swidarski recently earned her PhD from The Ohio State University in Public Health. She has a background in social psychology and health behavior change with a minor in city and regional planning. She has served as the Program Manager for the Columbus Safe Routes to School program since August 2017. In her role, she works collaboratively with the Columbus City School District, various City of Columbus Departments, and neighbors of Columbus to advance policy, systems and environmental changes for the safety of children. Before moving to central Ohio, Swidarski spent 10 years advancing safe routes county-wide in Miami-Dade, Florida and San Francisco, California.

Towards Zero Deaths: Improving Pedestrian Safety within Ohio

Over the last ten years, Ohio has seen a significant increase in the number pedestrians being killed or seriously injured on our roadways. This session will explore the factors underlying this increase and highlight projects being undertaken at the state, regional and local level to address them.

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About the Panel

  • Lauren Cardoni is a senior planner with the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), where she works to improve active transportation and transportation safety for the Central Ohio region. Lauren manages the safety program at MORPC, which includes development of the regional safety plan, annual analysis of regional crash data, and providing technical assistance to local governments. Lauren also coordinates the various active transportation programs and regional active transportation planning efforts conducted by MORPC.
  • Tricia Fought is the traffic studies engineer with the City of Columbus, Division of Traffic Management. She supervises a team of engineers and associates who collect and analyze all facets of traffic data.  The results reveal if current or projected traffic conditions warrant changes to the city’s infrastructure to promote the safe travel of all users.  When changes are warranted, Tricia works closely with the Administration to set project priorities and determine appropriate funding sources.
  • Jordan Whisler is with the Ohio Department of Transportation and where he manages ODOT’s Local Safety and Active Transportation programs and serves as the state’s pedestrian coordinator. In his role, Jordan focuses on initiatives related to statewide pedestrian and bicycle planning, multi-modal facility design, non-motorized data collection, and active transportation funding.

The Shape of Our Communities: Zoning and Land-Use for Walkability

At the foundation of every community is the ground we walk on. Learn how zoning and other policies related to land-use can have a major impact on how our communities move, act, and engage.

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Moderator: Dr Thomas Schmid, PhD, Senior Advisor, Physical Activity and Health Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

About the Panel

  • Ted Beidler is the Mobility Engineer for the Franklin County Engineer’s Office in Columbus, Ohio. He has been working in the bridge and highway industry for 28 years. His responsibilities include the planning, funding and project management of roadway and bridge projects within Franklin County. He has worked extensively with other government agencies and private parties to construct over 100 projects varying from simple culvert replacements to new, multi-lane roadways. Ted is also a board member with Central Ohio Greenways and is playing a role in that group’s effort to expand the trail system throughout the 7-county central Ohio area.Ted holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from The Ohio State University and an M.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Kansas. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Ohio. Ted and his wife Jennifer spend their spare time on their tandem bicycle riding all of the “rail-trails” they can find within driving distance of Columbus.
  • Robert Ferrin, Assistant Director for Parking Services, Columbus, OH As the Assistant Director for Parking Services, Robert oversees the administration, enforcement, operations, and management of public parking for the City of Columbus.  Robert and his team are leading efforts to increase mobility options and parking access to support the growth and development of the City through initiatives including the Short North Parking Plan and Strategic Parking Plan.  Robert moved to Columbus in late 2017 from Colorado, where he spent nearly seven years working in various parking leadership roles with the City and County of Denver as their Manager of On-Street Programs and the City of Aurora as their Parking & Mobility Manager.
  • Marta Goldsmith, Executive Director, Form-Based Codes Institute at Smart Growth America Ms. Goldsmith is Executive Director of the Form-Based Codes Institute (FBCI) at Smart Growth America, where she directs FBCI’s technical assistance, professional development, award program and other activities. Prior to joining Smart Growth America, Ms. Goldsmith was Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at LRG, Inc. a public affairs and nonprofit management firm. Ms. Goldsmith has served as Senior Adviser to the Commissioner of the Public Buildings Service, GSA and as Chief Operating Officer of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, a global NGO that provides technical expertise to accelerate the growth of sustainable transport and urban development around the world.
    Prior to her tenure at GSA and ITDP, Marta worked at the Urban Land Institute, where she was responsible for a wide range of programs during her 22-year tenure including land use policy research and publications, advisory services, community outreach, professional development, fundraising and international programs. Marta also served as Executive Director of the Southern Governors Association and as Special Assistant to the Governor of Florida for community and economic development, housing, and transportation issues.
    She taught graduate planning courses at the University of Virginia and was selected as a W.K. Kellogg National Leadership Fellow. Marta earned her master’s degree in City Planning from Harvard University and a BSc in Sociology from Indiana University.
  • Planner and lawyer Sean Suder is Lead Principal of Calfee Zoning, a zoning consultancy affiliated with the Ohio-based law firm of Calfee, Halter & Griswold, LLP.  He leads the law firm’s zoning practice and consults with local governments across Ohio and the eastern United States to craft clear, consistent, usable and defensible zoning codes that respect existing while promoting desired development patterns.
    From 2010 to 2014, he served as the Chief Counsel of Land Use and Planning for the City of Cincinnati where he represented the municipal corporation and its officials in all planning, land use, zoning, historic preservation and building matters.  In that role, Sean served as lead counsel for the award-winning Cincinnati Form-Based Code.  He also served as the lead counsel for the Cincinnati Land Development Code, a new take on the City’s remaining Euclidean zoning, and for the City’s award-winning Historic Preservation ordinance.
    In addition to speaking on the topic of zoning at national, regional and local planning and zoning conferences, he has served as Ohio faculty for the Form-Based Code Institute, an adjunct professor of land use law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, and has been a guest lecturer at the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Art, Architecture and Planning.  His articles have been published in the Cincinnati EnquirerMidwest Real Estate NewsCities & Villages MagazineOhio Planners News, and others.
    Sean is licensed to practice law in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and the District of Columbia.  He was recognized by Chambers USA, Real Estate: Zoning/Land Use, 2019, and for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© 2019 in the areas of Real Estate Law and Zoning Law.

Walk to the Future

The vision of Smart Columbus is to demonstrate how the future of mobility can empower all residents to live their best lives.  Join the Smart Columbus team and pilot participants to learn how Columbus is accelerating human progress through open mobility for all.

About the Moderator:

Alyssa Chenault, Communications Project Manager, Smart Columbus City of Columbus Alyssa Chenault (She/Her/Hers) is the Communication Project Manager for the Smart Columbus initiative. Alyssa leads public outreach and consumer adoption efforts for the Smart Cities Challenge portfolio of projects funded by the U.S Department of Transportation.

About the Panel

Julie Faieta is a licensed occupational therapist and full time PhD candidate in Ohio State’s Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Program. Julie’s primary area of research is in the development and evaluation of assistive and pervasive technology-based interventions to address health span and quality of life in neurodegenerative population and their caregivers, with a specific interest in Alzheimer’s disease and sleep focused interventions. Julie is interested in developing intervention protocols that can be effectively implemented to those at risk of disease development and at each stage of the disease progression. In addition to her academic pursuits, Julie has also maintained active involvement in the American Congress of Rehabilitative Medicine’s Neurodegenerative Networking Group as the chair of the Alzheimer’s Disease Task Force and as the Social Media Officer.  At the university level, Julie serves as the Council of Graduate Students Health and Rehabilitation Sciences delegate.

John Lathram moved to the North Linden area in 1995 because of its affordability and proximity to Downtown Ohio State University where he served as an adjunct professor in the Art Department.

John has been an active member of the North Linden area, where he serves as block watch captain and Social Media Director for the North Linden Community Watch. He joined the commission in 2015 moving up the ranks to Chair this year

His dedication to Linden is to make sure that every resident of Linden has the necessary tools to ensure affordable, clean and safe housing, reducing infant mortality in the community by making sure expectant mothers have access to proper nutrition, medical care via transportation to medical appointments and educational needs for all families in Linden.

Mr. Lathram served on Mayor Ginthers Advisory Council for the revitalization plan for Linden , the Diversity Chamber of Central Ohio and serves as the Smart Columbus liaison for North Linden, where his focus is to increase the use of public transportation resources that will soon be available to them. He would like new developers moving to the neighborhood to begin to think about the walkability factor in our neighborhood, which is currently one of the lowest in the city, by encouraging and welcoming minority owned businesses to Linden and provide the healthy resources they need.

Mr. Lathrams vision for a better Linden requires all of our community to join together in making Linden a great place to live, love, work and play in the healthiest way possible.

From the First Step: Celebrate One

Celebrate One believes that the greatest gift our community can give each baby is a healthy and safe first year of life that sets him or her on a path to thrive each year beyond that. Learn how this program is starting infants and families on a healthy path and the impact it is having across communities.

On the Same Team: Decision-Makers and Advocates Together for Walkable Communities

When decision-makers and advocates come together, magic happens. This session will look at the tools and resources available to help create meaningful communication between elected officials and other stakeholders and showcase examples of when it has worked well.

About the Panel

Council President Pro Tempore Elizabeth Brown, City of Columbus In addition to her local elected official role, Brown is the Executive Director of the Ohio Women’s Public Policy Network, a member of the Columbus Women’s Commission and serves on the CelebrateOne Policy Committee. She formerly worked as an economic development manager to the City of Columbus, taught middle school students as a City Year Americorps member and has been published in New York Magazine and WOSU Public Radio. President Pro Tem Brown’s core objective on Council is to fight for broad-based economic prosperity and job creation that addresses both business growth and poverty reduction.

Council Member Emily Keeler, City of Grandview Heights Keeler has a passion for bike and walk safety and improving communications and transparency. In her Council role, she serves as the liaison for the Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), Finance Committee Chair and Traffic Advisory Group member. Keeler’s full-time job at The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy as Wellness and Community Builder allows her to connect people within Ohio State to the community at large, and she is a member of the Association of Staff and Faculty Women Board of Directors and the Ohio State Medicine and the Arts Board.  She has a deep passion for promoting healthy communities.

Founder John H. Gregory, National African American Male Wellness Initiative Gregory is known as “The Solutions Man” and is passionate about urban issues. Founder and CEO of the National Center for Urban Solutions and the Academy for Urban Scholars, he has a national reputation for his work as a social entrepreneur that has been recognized with the Business First Health Hero, Best Practice Model for the Department of Labor and Housing Urban Development and the Governor’s Excellence in Public Service Awards. Gregory’s success in creating opportunities for improved health and increased employment has been via forming effective partnerships with corporate and community organizations.

Executive Director Catherine Girves, Yay Bikes! Innovatively promoting safe active transportation experiences in Central Ohio, Girves has realized significant achievements heading up a non-profit organization with a mission to support people through the tools of education and advocacy. Among the creative strategies she employs to engage decision makers are professional development rides with engineers, planners and government officials. Girves serves on the Central Ohio Greenways Board and is a resourceful and energetic team leader with a record of inspiring volunteers to create and operate award winning programs as well as collaborating in service to the common good.

Manager of Government Affairs Jason Warner, Greater Ohio Policy Center Warner advocates for issues and policy positions at the Statehouse, and he brings more than 15 years of experience working in and around Ohio state government. For more than eight years, he served as a legislative aide in the Ohio House of Representatives, working on a wide array of policy matters including community revitalization, economic development, housing, education and transportation. A former staff assistant to the House Ways & Means Committee and House Finance Transportation Subcommittee, Warner also worked for more than two years addressing issues before the Joint Committee on Agency Rule Review.

Council President Brian Housh, Village of Yellow Springs Housh is an avid trail user, Midwest Policy Manager for Rails-to-Trails Conservancy and a Miami Valley Regional Planning Executive Committee Member. His active-transportation lifestyle is supported by residing along the Little Miami Scenic Trail, part of the nation’s largest paved trail network. Housh is deeply engaged in economic development initiatives emphasizing strategies that enhance quality of life, create jobs and increase commerce via arts, culture and environmental sustainability; he spent 12 years in Thailand managing his corporate communications training consultancy and leading the American Chamber’s charitable efforts.

Creating Creative Places

Walkable communities are places that cultivate and celebrate creativity. This session will examine how communities are using art and placemaking to build connections and foster activity.

Moderator: Mukul Malhotra, Principal, MIG

About the Panel

  • Matt Leasure is a certified planner and professional landscape architect with 16 years of experience on a variety of urban design, parks and recreation, and private development projects. He is a Principal of Designing Local, where he leads projects which focus on placemaking and public space design. He is a proponent of public engagement as a fundamental element of the creative process and strives to weave local storytelling into each project. Matt serves as Advocacy Chair for Columbus Landmarks, Central Ohio’s primary historic preservation and urban design advocacy group, and is a lecturer at OSU’s Knowlton School of Architecture.

  • Jess Mathews’ passion and commitment toward people-centered places is unparalled. Through community engagemtn and building bulldog persistence, Jess creates places in our community where people interact with each other and the environment. She has achieved great success with her ‘PlaceMakes’ initiative which includes the West Cherry St ‘Re-Imagined’ Project, the 4th St, Gay St. and Franklinton Parklets, and her recent work at The Gravity mixed-use development project. The success of her many ‘citizen-led’ projects has motivated her to start her own consulting business: Epic Small Consulting. Epic Small helps communities execute small-scale placemaking projects that brings people joy, and helps move the needle toward more inclusive community design. Jess is also a bicycle advocate and has been featured at TEDx Columbus.
  • Jamie McMillen is the Vice President of Government Affairs for the Akron Cleveland Association of Realtors. Since late 2009, Jamie has spearheaded fundraising efforts for the Realtors PAC totaling more than $1 million. She has worked with officials at every level of government to protect private property rights, remove barriers to homeownership, and ensure northeast Ohio is “Home for All.” Under Jamie’s leadership, ACAR has partnered on placemaking projects in Akron, Cleveland, Euclid, Maple Heights, and South Euclid. She currently serves as the chair of the Ohio Realtors Equal Opportunity & Diversity Forum and is the Ohio representative to the Realtor Party Member Involvement Committee at the National Association of Realtors. A native of Cadiz (kad-IZ), Ohio, McMillen has a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Mount Union. In her spare time, she volunteers with the National Cabinet of Mount Union Women and Keep Akron Beautiful. She lives in the Firestone Park region of Akron with her Boxer (Ziggy) and Siamese (Jax).